US Senate

Dec. 3, 2017 (by Ozerov/Suwanapruti at Goldman Sachs Research) - As we wind down 2017, analysts at GS Research see the potential for stronger global growth in 2018 that could boost emerging market currencies and could create USD, SGD and JPY short opportunities against the BRL, INR, and IDR.

“One of our core macro views for next year is for the strong and synchronous global expansion to continue, surprising consensus expectations to the upside. Healthy global growth and trade generally favours emerging market assets — and EM currencies often push beyond ‘fair value’. Two of our Top Trade recommendations capture the currency implications of stronger global and EM growth using baskets in two regions: Asia and Latin America. Top Trade #6 (long INR, IDR, KRW vs. short SGD and JPY) aims to benefit from the ‘equity-centricity’ of Asian currencies, and some country-specific catalysts in India, Indonesia and South Korea. Funding out of SGD and JPY should help mitigate rate risk given the elevated sensitivity of JPY to increases in global interest rates. Top Trade #7 (long BRL, CLP, PEN vs. short USD) is predicated on the expected upside in metals prices, undervalued currencies and still early innings in the Latin America growth recovery.”

 

European Economics Analyst: When regions fail

“At the international level, Europe’s productivity performance has disappointed. Consider the evolution of average output per worker since 1990. The United States started higher and grew faster. At the national level, there is evidence of catch-up convergence among countries within Europe. Less productive countries have tended to exhibit faster post-war productivity growth than their more productive peers. But the degree of dispersion in productivity across European countries has increased over the past decade, despite having fallen for fifty years in the run-up to EMU. At the sub-national level, there is some evidence of productivity divergence between regions within countries. In France and Sweden, for example, regions in which labour productivity was low in 2000 tended to exhibit slower productivity growth between 2000 and 2015 than regions in which labour productivity was high.”

 

US Economics Analyst: Losing My Deduction

“The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) now making its way through Congress is likely to restrict the federal deductibility of state and local taxes. We now expect a repeal of the federal deductibility of state and local (S&L) income taxes as well as a $10k cap on the property tax deduction. Under current law, the ability to deduct taxes paid from taxable income lowers the effective S&L tax rate. While eliminating this deduction would raise substantial federal revenues, the sharper regional differences in effective tax rates would also make it harder for S&L governments to raise income and property taxes.”


USA 

Dec. 1, 2017 (Tempus Inc.) - The U.S. Dollar has been swinging within tight ranges and closed the week in similar fashion as markets awaited the chance of tax reform legislation passing the Senate.

USD

Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee is said to be an obstacle towards voting and maintaining confidence of necessary support. Any headlines that provide guidance into proceedings will drive markets one way or the other.

Additionally, market participants are paying attention to news of a potential exit by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who is said to be threading on thin ice with the White House. In terms of data, manufacturing gauges like PMI and New Orders will be released at 9:45AM while Construction Spending at 10AM. We think positivity could help recover some of this week’s losses.

EUR

The Euro is trending in favorable ranges as focus remained on U.S. political developments. However, this may change in upcoming weeks as Chancellor Angela Merkel continues to run into problems as she negotiates building a coalition. Nevertheless, the balance for the shared currency came in as news of slightly than expected Manufacturing Purchasing Managers Index figures.

Economics are keeping the Euro afloat, but the potential unstable situation in the largest economy of the Euro-bloc is cause for concern. Italy also faces the prospect of new anti-establishment leadership going into 2018.

CAD

The Canadian Dollar improved by over 1.0% meriting appreciation on the basis of solid Gross Domestic Product Growth during the month of September. Data showed a 0.2% expansion over the estimated 0.1%, bringing the yearly average to 3.3%, a level that satisfies the Bank of Canada’s outlook. Oil prices also being on the way up as winter sets in and OPEC extends production cuts could result in further gains before the year ends.

Pressure mounting on Republicans to make deal. Investor confidence appears to hold. Senate action expected. Live blog coverage of Congress’ attempt to reopen the US government and steer the world’s biggest economy clear of the default cliff…

 


Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “US pushed to brink of default as hopes hang on bipartisan Senate deal – live” was written by Tom McCarthyin New York, for theguardian.com on Wednesday 16th October 2013 13.26 UTC

The Senate convenes at noon today. The House is scheduled to meet at 10am. President Obama is scheduled to have lunch with vice president Biden and has meetings today with his secretaries of treasury and state.

Good morning and welcome to our live blog coverage of Congress’ attempt to reopen government and steer clear of the default cliff.

Tuesday was a bad day on Capitol Hill. It began with hopes for a bipartisan Senate deal. Then House Republicans announced they were going to make a deal of their own. ”Whatever proposal we move forward will reflect our emphasis on fairness,” majority leader Eric Cantor said. But there was no proposal to follow. The leadership could not bring the hard-right faction on board.

Today begins with hopes for a bipartisan Senate deal. The Wall Street Journal has published an editorial telling Republicans that enough is enough: “Republicans can best help their cause now by getting this over with and moving on to fight more intelligently another day,” the paper concludes. The conservative National Review reports that GOP members indeed are ready to just “get it over with”.

The markets showed a bit of queasiness in yesterday’s tumble-jumble, but declined to panic.

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Senate leaders join struggle to find passable bill. Stock markets only mildly perturbed. “Reneging on its debt obligations would make the U.S. the first major Western government to default since Nazi Germany 80 years ago,” Bloomberg reports…

 


Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “US shutdown: Congress reconvenes after weekend of choppy talks – live” was written by Tom McCarthyin New York, for theguardian.com on Monday 14th October 2013 15.31 UTC

Texas Senator Ted Cruz, whose quixotic campaign to “defund” Obamacare was the stick in the spokes that got us here, could – could – cause a default all by himself, Joshua Green reports in Bloomberg BusinessWeek:

How could this happen? Because the Senate can move quickly when necessary–but only by unanimous consent. Let’s say Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell strike a deal today (that’s looking unlikely). Cruz surely won’t like it and has said repeatedly, “I will do everything necessary and anything possible to defund Obamacare.” If he’s true to his word, he could drag out the proceedings past Thursday and possibly well beyond. “If a determined band of nut jobs wants to take down the global economy, they could do it,” says Jim Manley, a former top staffer for Reid. “Under Senate rules, we are past the point of no return–there’s not anything Reid or McConnell could do about it.”

Read the full piece here. There’s no indication that Cruz is that crazy?

“Reneging on its debt obligations would make the U.S. the first major Western government to default since Nazi Germany 80 years ago,” Bloomberg reports.

Updated

Congress won’t act until markets panic, they say. Comforted by the implication that Congress can and will act, markets don’t panic. But Congress won’t act until markets panic. Comforted by…

Anatomy of a deal

How might an eventual deal look? What are the sticking points?

Congress must decide how long to extend the debt limit and how long to fund the government for. Legislators must also decide the level at which to fund government – whether or not to retain the deep “sequester” cuts that took effect on March 1, and for how long.

Republicans would like a shorter debt limit extension in order to maintain leverage in budget negotiations. Democrats would like a shorter-term funding bill in order to accelerate the end of the sequester, which chunked $85bn off the budget between March and October.

At the end of September, Senate Democrats passed conciliatory legislation that would have funded the government at sequestration levels through November – but the bill was rejected by House Republicans. Token Conservative New York Times columnist Ross Douthat retold the history in a recommended Twitter lecture on Sunday:

But now the “original” potential deal to keep government open over the short term at sequester levels is gone, and everything seems back in play. The distance between the two sides on the debt limit extension and the term of the spending bill is a matter of months, NBC’s John Harwood reports:

The Washington Post’s Greg Sargent sees a possible deal by which Democrats would demand the destruction of the debt ceiling as a counterweight to Republican demands on spending:

So here’s what Dems should do. If Republicans refuse to budge off their insistence on lower spending levels, Dems should call their bluff by demanding a permanent disabling of the debt limit as an extortion tool as part of any short-term compromise. (Yes, Republicans will say No. But bear with me.)

If, somehow, a deal is reached this week in the Senate that involves Republicans giving ground on spending levels, Dems should make the push for a permanent disabling of the debt limit a key goal in the next round of formal, long term negotiations.

In the short term, if Dems accept sequester level spending into early next year in exchange for permanent disabling of the debt limit, it would not be an awful outcome.

Read the full piece here.

Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia, a centrist Democrat, offered a relatively optimistic view of the negotiations this morning on CNN. Talking Points Memo caught the spot:

“I think we’re 70-80% there, putting the extra 20-25% to it,” Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) said Monday on CNN.” “When should the (continuing resolution) come due, when should the debt ceiling come due, and does that give that time for the budget conference, the budget committees to sit down and work through this? Those are the details that have to be worked out.”

Updated

Leaders of the World Bank and IMF warned at a meeting in Washington DC Sunday of the disastrous consequences of a US default, the New York Times reports. Some damage has already been done, as borrowing costs for the United States – over the short term, at least – are creeping up.

Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, warned of “massive disruption the world over” if the United States plunges into default. At the start of the month she said it is “‘mission-critical’ that [the US default risk] be resolved as soon as possible.”

From the Times report on the Washington meeting:

Participants at the meetings remained on edge, given the gravity of the threat. Ms. Lagarde said “that lack of certainty, that lack of trust in the U.S. signature” would disrupt the world economy.

Wolfgang Schäuble, the German finance minister, issued his own urgent appeal. “The fiscal standoff has to be resolved without delay,” he said in a statement released by the I.M.F.

Read the full piece here.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average opens the day down just a bit, about a half-percent. The bets are still on, for now.

President Obama spoke yesterday with House minority leader Nancy Pelosi, and the two party leaders in the Senate – Democrat Harry Reid and Republican Mitch McConnell – have been holding talks through the weekend that were expected to resume this morning.

Talks between the president and the House Republican leadership – so hopeful as of Friday evening – foundered on Saturday. “No deal” Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan told reporters at the Capitol.

The needle they’re collectively trying to thread is legislation raising the debt ceiling that would be acceptable to both Senate Democrats and House Republicans. The current legislation thought to be under discussion would also provide for reopening government and settle a budget through the New Year.

If a catchall deal proves unworkable, Congress may have to pass the debt limit bill separately. However it may actually be easier to pass a catchall deal, because there are more variables and thus more room for negotiation – and compromise.

Guardian Washington correspondent Dan Roberts (@RobertsDan) is tracking the action:

Democrat majority leader, Harry Reid, appeared briefly in the Senate to say he had a “productive and substantive” discussion with Republican Mitch McConnell and was optimistic about a deal, but suspended public proceedings until 2pm on Monday while his backroom talks continued.

The only outward sign of movement from the White House came in a Sunday afternoon phone call with House minority leader Nancy Pelosi, in which President Obama reiterated his insistence on Republicans agreeing to end a government shutdown and extend the debt ceiling before he would negotiate any budget concessions.

Read the full piece here.

Early Halloween.

Good morning and welcome to our live blog coverage of yet another moment of truth in Washington. If the nation’s legislators can’t cut a deal soon – they have a day or two; just exactly how long is a matter for debate – then we get to find out if Warren Buffett was just being a hysterical ninny when he compared default to “a nuclear bomb”.

Negotiations through the weekend failed to produce a deal, or clear a pathway to a deal. Since Friday, talks between House Republican leaders and the White House have fallen apart, and talks between the party leaders in the Senate have sprung up. The House is scheduled to convene today at noon, the Senate shortly thereafter.

The top priority for Congress is to pass legislation that would raise the debt limit sufficiently to fund the Treasury’s accounts payable. They also need to pass a bill to reopen the federal government, which has been partially shuttered for 14 days now (it closed on 1 October). In the current environment, having the government closed is only Code Orange. The debt limit is the Code Red bit.

Investors are holding their breaths to see what the stock market will think of the weekend’s dithering. Knowledgable analysts have suggested that a stock market crash may be the most likely spur to get Congress to actually act. The bond market is closed Monday for the Columbus Day holiday, but stocks are open. The Dow still was relatively unbothered by the crisis on Friday.

The Treasury has said the “extraordinary measures” it has taken since May to cover expenses will be exhausted Thursday, at which point the government will be operating on about $30bn cash on hand and a prayer, with neither expected to last long

Updated

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House and Senate fail to reach deal before deadline. Estimated 800,000 federal workers told to stay at home. National parks and museums closed, Nasa affected. Signs of splits among Republicans over tactics. The President plans to make a statement today…

 


Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “US government shutdown begins as Congress fails to reach deal – live” was written by Tom McCarthy in New York, for theguardian.com on Tuesday 1st October 2013 16.12 UTC

Guardian Washington correspondent Paul Lewis (@PaulLewis) is in the streets of Washington DC, a city in which the government is not just the main employer, but the lifeblood of the city. The impacts of the shutdown were immediately visible, Paul writes:

By mid-morning, downtown Washington DC had the throng of a busy lunchtime, as furloughed workers from all the major government buildings trickled out onto the streets after closing down their offices.

Everywhere from obscure government agencies to the White House was operating on a slimmed-down staff, with all so-called ‘non-excepted’ employees ordered to return home after turning up to work on Tuesday morning.

DC’s mayor, Vincent Gray, immunised many staff working for the city’s government from the shutdown, by declaring them all ‘essential’ workers, a legally contentious measure. But it at least kept the city movement, and guarded America’s capital from less sightly impacts of the last shutdown, in the 1990s, when uncollected trash piled up on the street.

Later we’ll have Paul’s interviews with tourists and federal workers talking about how the shutdown is affecting them.

Updated

Veterans of World War II have stormed their own memorial on the National Mall, barricades be damned, reporter Leo Shane III of Stars and Stripes tweets:

Honor flight vets just knocked over the barriers at the WWII memorial to get inside, #shutdown or no.

No sign of folks leaving. The vets have control of the memorial. #shutdown

John McCain may be trying to make a point by publicizing polling showing Americans oppose the GOP strategy of tying the shutdown to health care cuts, but most national polls on who gets blamed are rather useless in understanding what’s going through the mind of the House GOP, Guardian polling analyst Harry J Enten (@ForecasterEnten) writes.

Harry argues that, district-for-district, Republicans really aren’t vulnerable to voter outrage in midterm elections in 2014 because the districts are rigged:

While there are a number of reasons why House Republicans were willing to shut down the government, no answer is probably as satisfying as the fact that majority of House Republicans don’t live in districts that look anything like the rest of the nation. Thanks to urban packing and gerrymandering, Republicans don’t have to worry about losing to a Democrat.

The average vote share for President Obama in 2012 in Republican House districts was only 40.4%. Only 17 members of the Republican House caucus are from districts that voted for Obama in 2012. More than half of Republicans in the House come from districts that are 10 points more Republican than the nation as a whole. The average Republican district is over a 11 points more Republican than the nation.

The thing that most worries most members is likely a primary challenge, not a general election. The fact that more Republicans support a shutdown to stop Obamacare, as Quinnipiac found, is what’s most important for them.

That analysis leaves open the question on whether blowback from the shutdown represents potential damage to a party’s national brand, with consequences for membership, fundraising, turnout, activism, public support in hard policy fights and more.

Shut down: Tweets from Voyager 2. 

Not to be confused with Voyager 1, which recently entered interstellar space. Voyager 2 is only 15.37bn km away, according to the Nasa site that tracks it, which interestingly is still online here.

Updated

Shut down: the US Census Bureau online. 

You can’t visit the web site here, but you can read a shutdown notice.

(h/t @kennelliott)

Updated

Senator Mike Lee of Utah, who with Ted Cruz of Texas led the charge to tie stopgap spending legislation to changes to Obamacare, is delivering a speech on the Senate floor calling for a focus on people whose livelihoods will be damaged by the government shutdown. “I want to focus our attention in the coming days and hours on those people,” Lee says, gravely.

It turns out however that mostly Lee wants to continue his critique of the Affordable Care Act. “I’d like to turn for a moment to people who are and for a number of months have been already [hurting],” he says. “Obamacare happens to be the No.1 job-killer in the country.”

Threatened by shutdown: airport efficiency(!).

Here’s a question from the comments:

Can someone tell me will airport be affected? Ie will take ages to get through security?

Answer, in short: Yes, expect some delays, but security will remain tight. The Transportation Security Administration, part of the department of Homeland Security, is expected to furlough certain nonessential employees, but those do not include most screeners. Air traffic controllers will report for work as usual.

John McCain, Republican of Arizona, argued Monday against the House Republican shutdown strategy, telling the House to accept fate and pass a “clean” spending resolution.

This morning McCain indulges in a preliminary bit of “I told you so,” directed at Republican colleagues:

From the Bloomberg story:

By 72 percent to 22 percent, Americans oppose Congress “shutting down major activities of the federal government” as a way to stop the Affordable Care Act from going into effect, the national survey from Quinnipiac University found. [...]

A majority of the public, 58 percent, is opposed to cutting off funding for the insurance program that begins enrollment today. Thirty-four percent support defunding it.

Note that the poll featured in the story McCain links to is from last week; while the Bloomberg story is from today, it does not reflect new polling from today.

Updated

Here’s the tabloid view, then and now:

Shut down: Freedom of Information Act requests.

The justice department claims it can’t meet FOIA deadlines in an Electronic Frontier Foundation lawsuit over phone metadata collection because of the shutdown, Politico’s Josh Gerstein reports:

Just hours after the partial government shutdown kicked in, Justice Department lawyers filed a motion Tuesday morning with a federal judge in Oakland, Calif. seeking to postpone all deadlines in connection with a suit brought by the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

The motion submitted to U.S. District Court Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers (and posted here) says the government will be unable to continue reviewing documents for release because both DOJ lawyers and intelligence community personnel involved in the process are being furloughed.

Read the full piece here.

Senate minority whip John Cornyn, Republican of Texas, says Democrats are “whistling past the graveyard” in asserting that the Affordable Care Act is not negotiable:

“This is the law of the land. It’s perfect. Couldn’t be better,” Cornyn, on the Senate floor, ridicules his Democratic colleagues as saying. “That’s like whistling past the graveyard.”

Then Cornyn accuses Democrats of engineering the shutdown because polls show Republicans will take the blame:

They’re looking at polls…They’re willing to risk shutdown of the federal government just to gain political advantage… The Democrats have doubled down on their strategy, hoping to gain political advantage at the expense of people hurt.

Part of the difficulty this morning for 2m federal workers is that many did not find out until they showed up for work as usual whether they were part of the “essential” core that would be kept on the job. Some were told to stay. Others were sent home.

The Guardian’s Paul Lewis (@PaulLewis) and Dan Roberts (@RobertsDan) are watching the shutdown unfold in Washington:

Some federal workers were reportedly instructed to switch off their BlackBerry smartphones to prevent them from working remotely, a disciplinary offence.

From 7am, forlorn-looking commuters could be seen heading to government buildings and agencies across Washington DC, where they would learn their fate. The city, where the government is a huge employer, will feel the impact of the federal shutdown more acutely than anywhere else in the US. The White House said it estimates a one-week shutdown would cost the wider US economy $10bn.

Read the full piece here.

Dan also has the inside story of how the shutdown played out in the halls of Congress last night:

Unfortunately, much of Washington acted as if it had seen this movie before. The metaphorical tumbleweed blowing down the corridors of Capitol Hill reflected not a fear of being caught in the crossfire, but a cynical war-weariness that left many lawmakers on the sidelines until it was too late. After three years of similar standoffs over the federal budget that were resolved at the last minute, no one could quite believe that this one would finish with shots fired.

Read the full story here.

The Senate has killed the House GOP request for a budget conference, again along party lines, 54-46.

Senate majority leader Harry Reid is on the floor of the Senate decrying the House request as a cynical 11th-hour ploy meant to portray the GOP as being serious about making a budget deal when in fact the party has, Reid says, ignored six months’ worth of Senate requests for a conference. Here’s Reid:

Sen. Murray [Patty Murray, D-Washington, budget committee chairwoman] has asked to go to conference 18 times. [McCain] has asked eight times himself. This has gone on for six months.

But it’s a clock tick past midnight… Boehner demanded the very conference they shunned us with for six months.

This display I hope would be embarrassing for House Republicans and Senate Republicans… what a deal!

If the House passes the piece of legislation they have over there… to reopen government, we’re happy to go to conference – why wouldn’t we? We’ve been asking to do that for months and months.

Updated

Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona, sees the shutdown as a boon to the president because it distracts from the administration’s woes elsewhere:

“Obamacare is going to have a lot of problems in its rollout… the president’s poll numbers are falling in every category,” McCain told MSNBC. “Yet the story to the American people is Republicans are fighting Republicans – that’s not helpful.”

The president plans to make a statement today at 12.25pm ET in the Rose Garden, the White House advises.

As the two parties try to reach a spending agreement, they also are trying to pin the blame for the shutdown on the other side. In a statement in the briefing room yesterday afternoon the president said Republican maneuvers resulting in a government shutdown would be the “height of irresponsibility.” Expect the president to expand on that theme this afternoon.

Last time the government shut down, the Republican Congress caught the blame and the Democratic president emerged the stronger. That fact is not lost on the Obama administration, which is using president Clinton’s playbook, Bloomberg reports:

Five administration officials, including Treasury Secretary Jack Lew and budget director Sylvia Burwell, were central figures during the shutdowns of 1995 and 1996. That two-stage battle pitted a House Republican majority against Democratic President Bill Clinton and resulted in a public relations defeat for the Republicans.

Now, Like Clinton, Obama is casting his Republican rivals as partisan warriors willing to put the country’s economic future at risk to score political points with their base.

While Clinton chided Republicans for putting “ideology ahead of common sense” in a 1995 address, Obama told reporters yesterday that “House Republicans continue to tie funding of the government to ideological demands.”

Read the full piece here.

Updated

Are you a federal employee forced to stay home because of the shutdown? Is one of your family members an essential employee who has to work without pay? We want to hear from you:

* Where do you work? What is your role?

* What have your supervisors told you to expect in coming weeks? Please be specific. How will furloughs or payment delays affect you and/or your family?

* Is there anything you’d say to members of Congress? to President Obama or House Speaker John Boehner? Do you see the shutdown as necessary? Is there a silver lining?

Please share your views in the comments or reach out to us directly at ruth [dot] spencer [at] theguardian [dot] com. We’ll be featuring your comments here. Thanks for writing!

Welcome to our live blog coverage of the partial government shutdown, which went into effect at midnight. America is waking up to shuttered parks, silent call centers for veterans’ services, empty Pentagon offices and skeleton crews in White House and congressional offices. It’s the first government shutdown in 17 years.

The president signed a bill late on Monday defending against one of the most painful effects of a shutdown: the bill ensured there would be no delay in delivering paychecks to active-duty military personnel. The core services of other big government programs, including Medicare and social security, were expected to operate as usual.

The House and Senate played ping-pong on Monday with stopgap spending resolutions that would have kept the government open if they were able to agree on one. The last House resolution retained delays in the rollout of the Affordable Care Act that the Senate leadership had made clear would be rejected. The resolution was rejected, and at about 11.40pm ET the office of management of the budget sent out a memo ordering agencies to “execute plans for an orderly shutdown due to the absence of appropriations.” Read Jim Newell’s play-by-play of last night’s action here, and Graeme Wearden’s early-morning updates here.

Just before the shutdown, House Republicans made a significant move on the overall budget issue, electing to join a conference with the Senate to cut an actual budget deal, a step the House leadership had been resisting. Senate majority leader Harry Reid said he would not bargain over the current spending measure at a budget conference.

Updated

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Federal Reserve chair says bond-buying could slow. No firm plan for policy adjustment, however. Jobs market ‘far from satisfactory,’ Bernanke testifies. The Fed anticipates curtailing its assets purchasing program by the end of the year contingent on an improving economic picture…

 


Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Ben Bernanke: ‘We’re very focused on Main Street’ – as it happened” was written by Tom McCarthy, for theguardian.com on Wednesday 17th July 2013 15.44 UTC

1.31pm ET

Summary

We're going to wrap up our live blog coverage of Fed chair Ben Bernanke's House testimony. Here's a summary of where things stand:

Bernanke said the economy hasn't recovered enough for the Fed to take its foot off the gas – yet. "We need accommodative monetary policy for the foreseeable future," he said. 

The Fed anticipates curtailing its assets purchasing program, known as quantitative easing, by the end of the year, but that's contingent on an improving economic picture, which Bernanke emphasized isn't a given. Stocks were up and bonds were down slightly on the perceived signal that asset purchases could taper.

• Bernanke said the economy's still too weak to recommend raising interest rates. He reiterated two key benchmarks for moving rates: unemployment below 7% or inflation of 2%. We're not there yet.

Committee members thanked Bernanke for his service on the occasion of what may be his last appearance before the House as Fed chair. But it wasn't his last Hill appearance: he testifies before the Senate tomorrow. 

1.15pm ET

After 3+ hours of testimony before the House today, guess what Ben Bernanke gets to do tomorrow? Testify before the Senate. 10.30 am ET – be there.

1.13pm ET

And they're done. Adjourned.

1.12pm ET

Michele Bachmann, Republican of Minnesota, is up. She has a debt ceiling question. She says that for 56 days, federal debt on the books mysteriously stayed just under the debt ceiling.

"Has the federal government been cooking the books on this?" Bachmann asks.

Could be a good question – for the Treasury.

"This is not the federal reserve," Bernanke says. "You'd have to ask the secretary of the treasury."

Bachmann's follow-up: Have we exceeded our debt limit?

"Uh, I don't think so," Bernanke says.

1.04pm ET

Andy Barr, Republican of Kentucky, asks Bernanke about sustained unemployment: is it the Fed's fault or Obama's fault?

The economy has weak spots, but "it is the case that we have made some progress since 2009… we're doing better than a lot of other industrial countries," Bernanke replies.

Barr says there's "gotta be a fiscal policy problem here," because the Fed's expansionary policy has been responsible. But Barr isn't another self-hating Congressman. The implication is that it's Obama's fault.

12.59pm ET

University of Michigan professor Justin Wolfers notes that bond prices are down slightly... after months of steep climbing.

12.49pm ET

Guardian emergency responder Alan Yuhas clarifies the IRS Star Trek video reference. Alan wrote about it back in March:

The IRS has apologized for spending tens of thousands of taxpayer dollars to film a Star Trek parody, but has defended the value of Gilligan's Island parody made at the same time. The agency estimates that total expenditures were about ,000.

The Star Trek video features a spaceship on a "never-ending mission to seek out new tax reforms, to explore strange new regulations, to boldly go where no government employee has gone before". They set off to the planet Notax, whose fiscally irresponsible aliens live in chaos. The six-minute video has special effects, elaborate costumes, and two crewmen banter: "Back in Russia, I dreamed someday I'd be rich and famous." "Me too. That's why I became a public servant." The ship's captain throws up his hands in dismay as the crewmen bump fists.

Read the full fun piece here.

12.45pm ET

Congress.

"I feel like Bette Midler,' says Denny Heck, Democrat of Washington – "the very last guest on the very last episode of the Tonight Show. She famously quipped to Johny Carson, 'You are the wind beneath my wings.'"

Heck says Bernanke's like that, with the economy. 

Updated at 12.50pm ET

12.42pm ET

Dennis A. Ross, Republican of Florida, has said something about an "IRS Star Trek video." He does not elaborate. We'll wait for him to circle back around on that. He's calling for a healthy debate on the debt ceiling – he thinks that the brinksmanship that led to the downgrading of US debt was a good thing. Unclear whether there's a question coming here.

Bernanke says the debt ceiling fights are bad. 

"We did get a pretty big shock to consumer sentiment and it did do harm to the economy."

Updated at 1.19pm ET

12.36pm ET

Bernanke, still going strong, ish, 150 minutes in. Currently talking: Joyce Beatty, Democrat of Ohio, the second-least-senior member of the committee.

12.32pm ET

Randy Hultgren, Republican of Illinois, returns to a concern of many lawmakers on the GOP side, that the Fed is over-regulating community banks, which Hultgren says are being hurt by an interest-rate crunch.

Bernanke says the low rates are meant to strengthen the economy. Throughout the hearing he's deflected the assertion that local banking is crippled. "We're very focused on Main Street," he said early on.

Updated at 12.33pm ET

12.18pm ET

We're not going anywhere! This is the part where Bernanke drops the surprise that turns the economy on a dime. Any second now. 

Updated at 12.20pm ET

12.13pm ET

Marlin A. Stutzman, Republican of Indiana, asks whether Obamacare is hurting the economy. Bernanke admits there have been signs that employers are having some difficulty navigating the new rules requiring them to provide insurance if they carry a certain number of full-time employees:

"It's very hard to make any judgment. One thing that we hear… is that some employers are hiring part-time in order to avoid the mandate there. So we have heard that. But … the high level of part-time employment has been around since the beginning of the recovery, and we don't fully understand that.

Stutzman asks whether it might be smart to push back Obamacare compliance deadlines. Bernanke replies:

This is beyond my pay grade. This would depend on how well, and how much time is needed, to fully implement the bill.

12.04pm ET

Guardian finance and economics editor Heidi Moore flags an exchange between Bernanke and Republican Stephen Lee Fincher of Tennessee, who is worried about private sector dependence on federal largesse – except when he's not worried about that.

Updated at 12.05pm ET

11.44am ET

Emanuel Cleaver, Democrat of Missouri, has a koan-like question for the Fed chair:

What would be the consequences of easing quantitative easing prematurely? 

Bernanke replies with half of this and half of that. The Fed plans to decrease asset purchases unless that's not called for in which case they'll be continued.

11.38am ET

Guardian finance and economics editor Heidi Moore agrees with the congressman's assessment that the legislature hasn't done diddly to bring the jobs market back. In April she wrote, under the headline "When will this do-nothing Congress wake up to America's job crisis?":

While the unemployment rate is dropping, and the number of jobs goes up and down, the labor force participation rate has been steadily falling since the economy started weakening in 2007. [...]

This situation is, economically, a catastrophe. It has existed for the past five years, and no lawmaker in Washington has done very much about it. Somehow, a small group of Republican lawmakers have hijacked the national conversation about financial matters to blather about deficits and long-term budgets. (Leave aside the fact that not a single lawmaker, of either party, seems capable of putting together any kind of practical budget at all.)

Most Democrats and the White House have gone along with this empty rhetoric, accepting that the current standard of wise budgeting is "discipline" and "long-term goals". It's not. The current standard for the creation of a reasonable budget should be "do something that encourages job creation". This task has gone too long unaddressed.

Read the full piece here.

11.35am ET

Congress has to do more to instill confidence in consumers that "we will do things to help create jobs," Al Green, Democrat of Texas, says. "We have not done enough… your good work still needs some help from the policy makers.

"Consumers say to me, 'I need confidence.'" Really?

Bernanke is diplomatic. "No one has a magic formula" for creating consumer confidence, he says. 

11.28am ET

Stephen F. Lynch, Democrat of Massachusetts, is up. He notes that Bernanke is a scholar of the Depression era and wonders whether 30-year mortgages were available back then. They weren't; Lynch's point is to underscore the importance of government support for the housing market.

We want to keep "a preservable, 30-year fixed mortgage, keep that market going, without having the taxpayer take all the risk up front," Lynch says.

Bernanke says the government can't unilaterally move prices but it can step in when the market won't self-correct. "The argument for thinking about government participation is exactly like the situation we faced in the last few years, where there's a big housing problem" and private lenders aren't willing to act counter-cyclically, Bernanke says. 

Lynch thanks the Fed chair for his service. "I've heard stories that this might be your last appearance before this committee for this purpose," he says.

11.19am ET

Bernanke's lips are talking tapering, but that may not be the take-home message here:

Updated at 11.19am ET

11.16am ET

Suggested reading via the National Journal:

11.13am ET

Carolyn B. Maloney, Democrat of New York, is up. She defers to Ed Perlmutter, Democrat of Colorado, because he didn't get to ask a question last time Bernanke appeared.

Perlmutter thanks Bernanke for his steady hand on the economic rudder. Then he goes back to … the sequester. How do we better understand what this 1.5% in lost growth means, practically speaking, he asks.

Bernanke says losses could be thought of in terms of 760,000 "full-time equivalent jobs" or unemployment down "another seven or eight tenths, something like that."

"So it makes a very big difference," Bernanke says. "It's very substantial." 

11.08am ET

Dominic Rushe is keeping an attentive eye on the tickers. Stock markets are still rising as Bernanke speaks, he notes – the Dow is now up +24.13 points or 0.16%.

Hold onto your seats.

11.03am ET

Guardian US business correspondent Dominic Rushe captures the Fed chair in a pensive moment:

11.02am ET

Democrat William Lacy Clay of Missouri is up with a question about how the sequester may be hurting the jobs market.

"In this recovery, even as the private sector has been creating jobs, government at all levels has been cutting … 600,000 jobs," Bernanke says. He says that's unusual during an attempted recovery. 

He refers back to the CBO estimate that the sequester is dulling growth by 1.5% a year. Whose idea was the sequester again? Did we decide whom to blame? The Democrats keep bringing it up, apparently confident the public believes it's the fault of John Boehner's Congress. Insofar as the public is thinking about it.

Updated at 11.04am ET

10.58am ET

Isn't it true, Huizenga asks Bernanke, that Wall Street has benefited more from loose money and bond-buying than Main Street has? 

"I don't think so," the Fed chair replies. "We're working through the mechanisms we have, which of course are financial interest rates and financial asset prices."

"We're very focused on Main Street," Bernanke says.

Updated at 10.58am ET

10.55am ET

Bill Huizenga, Republican of Michigan, asks Bernanke if his buddy should refinance his house – is now a good time?

"I'm not qualified to respond as a financial adviser," Bernanke jokes. Ha.

10.52am ET

We have a self-hating Congress.

10.50am ET

Ranking Democrat Maxine Waters of California is up. She asks Bernanke about an IMF recommendation to repeal the sequester and raise the debt ceiling. The president would like that. Does Bernanke agree?

Bernanke says the sequester is hurting growth, to the tune of about 1.5% in 2013.

"As I've said many times, I think that fiscal policy is focusing too much on the short run and not enough on the long run," he says. 

10.46am ET

Bernanke answers a question from committee chair Jeb Hensarling, Republican of Texas.

Bernanke defends the Fed's decision to telegraph its intentions of keeping rates low, pegged to the unemployment and inflation benchmarks. He says markets are figuring out the Fed's intentions and relative stability is the result.

Updated at 10.46am ET

10.41am ET

If Bernanke testifies and no one hears him, did he make a sound?

10.40am ET

Bernanke testifies that the economy is recovering "at a moderate pace" but he doesn't sound inspired. Home sales and construction are up. Unemployment is down slightly – it hit 7.6% in June – but "the jobs situation is far from satisfactory." Inflation has not touched the 2% benchmark.

The Fed may begin to ease its bonds purchases "later this year," Bernanke says. But it's conditional on sinking unemployment or new indicators of inflationary pressure:

Committee participants also saw inflation moving back toward our 2 percent objective over time. If the incoming data were to be broadly consistent with these projections, we anticipated that it would be appropriate to begin to moderate the monthly pace of purchases later this year. And if the subsequent data continued to confirm this pattern of ongoing economic improvement and normalizing inflation, we expected to continue to reduce the pace of purchases in measured steps through the first half of next year, ending them around midyear. At that point, if the economy had evolved along the lines we anticipated, the recovery would have gained further momentum, unemployment would be in the vicinity of 7 percent, and inflation would be moving toward our 2 percent objective. Such outcomes would be fully consistent with the goals of the asset purchase program that we established in September.

10.31am ET

It works! They fixed it. Bernanke begins. Once more his remarks are here. CSPAN has yet to fix its online feed. The Wall Street Journal has a feed that's working fine.

10.29am ET

Now the committee members and the witness are just sitting uncomfortably staring at each other as presumably terrified techs try to sort out what's wrong.

Bernanke has his arms folded at the witness table and appears not the least put out at the unexpected twist. It's exactly the kind of composure the markets look for in a Fed chair. 

10.26am ET

Heidi Moore is the Guardian's finance and economics editor.

10.23am ET

Committee members are making opening statements, but they're hard to hear because either the mics or the speakers – it seems like a speaker issue – aren't working. CSPAN is not running its usual online video stream on account of the technical issue. 

The statements from committee members are barely audible on television with the volume turned up to around 40. What words can be made out sound safely dull.

It's like Bernanke mumblecore. 

10.15am ET

The Guardian's Dominic Rushe is watching the markets as we prepare to watch Bernanke. So far so good, he reports:

All the major US markets are up – a bit – ahead of Bernanke's testimony. The Dow is up 21 points, 0.14%. This despite the fact that the sequester has obviously taken a huge bite out of Congress's broadcast budget.

10.12am ET

Bernanke's testimony is delayed due to an audio problem in the hearing room. 

SELL! Sell!

While we wait you can read Bernanke's prepared remarks here

9.13am ET

Good morning and welcome to our live blog coverage of Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke's testimony before the House Financial Services Committee. Bernanke's testimony has been released in advance of his 10am ET start in an effort to forestall any undue market excitement.

According to his prepared remarks, Bernanke will announce a possible winding down of the central bank's program to add fuel to a sputtering economy by buying bn in bonds each month, cyclical purchases known as quantitative easing. "Our asset purchases depend on economic and financial developments, but they are by no means on a preset course," Bernanke will testify, according to Reuters:

Bernanke set off a brief but fierce global market sell-off last month when he outlined plans to reduce the quantitative easing program, and he has joined a slew of Fed officials since then who have spelled out their intention to keep interest rates near zero well after the asset purchases.

Bernanke will take questions from committee members on the health of the economy, expectations for unemployment, inflation and other indicators in his semi-annual trip to the Hill – potentially his final appearance as Fed chair. Watch it with us here. 

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Published via the Guardian News Feed plugin for WordPress.

Fiscal cliff deadline just hours away as Congress returns. No agreement has been reached between White House and Republicans in early morning talks. Latest deal to raise taxes on incomes over $450,000. Harry Reid says: ‘We really are running out of time’…



Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Fiscal cliff deadline looms as talks on a deal continue – live updates” was written by Richard Adams in Washington DC, for guardian.co.uk on Monday 31st December 2012 17.19 UTC

12.19pm ET

Republican senator John Cornyn of Texas tweets:

11.50am ET

This may be a good sign. Or a bad sign. It’s too soon to say.

Updated at 11.52am ET

11.44am ET

Politico takes a metaphor and mixes it to death:

The last-ditch horse-trading underscored the urgency of the situation….

Old Politico saying: never switch a gift horse in the ditch.

11.22am ET

GOP senator: ‘There has been a lot of progress’

Senate minority whip Jon Kyl is making happy noises to Reuters:

Senator Jon Kyl on Monday said a “lot of progress” has been made in talks to avert the “fiscal cliff” but he cautioned that it is unclear if the progress will spur legislation the Senate can vote on before a midnight deadline when taxes and spending cuts kick-in.

“There is no agreement yet,” Kyl said. “Conversations are still ongoing. There has been a lot of progress.”

Then Kyl has a little joke at Reuters’ expense:

Asked how long talks could go on, Kyl said: “I guess until 11.59.”

Updated at 11.24am ET

11.06am ET

Harry Reid: ‘discussions continue as I speak’

The Senate has just got underway, and here’s the Democratic majority leader Harry Reid:

Discussions continue today, Reid notes:

There are a number of issues on which the two sides are apart but discussions continue as I speak….

We really are running out of time, Americans are threatened with a tax hike in a few hours.

That was short and sweet from Reid. And believe it or not, that tells us a lot, because Reid didn’t bash the Republicans as he has done on every available occasion in the last week.

Equally significant: Mitch McConnell didn’t take the floor after Reid.

So a deal is on the way, is the bet.

Updated at 11.09am ET

11.00am ET

This one is for total US politics geeks only:

If you know what that means, you’ll know what that means. If you know what I mean.

Updated at 11.01am ET

10.57am ET

Deal is on the cards, reports ABC News

Are Joe Biden and Mitch McConnell getting close to a deal? ABC News thinks so:

An emerging tentative agreement would extend current tax rates for households making $450,000 or less; extend the estate tax at its current level of 35% for estates larger than $5m; and prevent the Alternative Minimum Tax from hammering millions of middle-class workers, sources said.

The deal would also extend unemployment benefits set to expire Tuesday and avert a steep cut to Medicare payments for doctors.

Both sides also seem willing to delay by three months automatic spending cuts to defense and domestic programs, the sources said, setting the stage for continued fiscal debate in the next few months tied to the debt ceiling.

Still have to get it through the House, though.

Updated at 10.57am ET

10.48am ET

The ‘dairy cliff’ explained

Bloomberg has some background on the little-known ‘dairy cliff‘, which is triggered by the failure to pass a new farm bill of agricultural support and subsidies, as well as food stamps:

The most recent farm law, enacted in 2008, expired after attempts to pass a new five-year proposal failed. Without that plan, agricultural programs automatically return to rules passed in 1949, the basis of all subsequent legislation.

The effects of that transition have been delayed because of the growing seasons of different crops. Dairy production, a year-round business, is the first major commodity affected. In November, the US Department of Agriculture put the price of a gallon of fresh whole milk at just under $3.54.

Under President Harry Truman’s farm policy, the government bought supplies of a product until its price reached “parity” with the cost immediately before World War I. Adjusted for a century of inflation, the Agriculture Department’s milk-support price today would be $39.08 per hundred pounds, more than double the dairy futures price in Chicago on December 28.

Updated at 10.49am ET

10.41am ET

McConnell and Biden have early talks

There’s a flurry of fiscal cliff stuff going on, as the House starts its session, and the Senate prepares to get going at 11am, with comments expected from majority leader Harry Reid and (presumably) minority leader Mitch McConnell.

Politico is reporting on optimistic signs of a deal emerging:

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and Vice President Joe Biden engaged in furious overnight negotiations to avert the fiscal cliff and made major progress toward a year-end tax deal, giving sudden hope to high-stakes talks that had been on the brink of collapse, according to sources familiar with the discussion.

It also says that conversations between Biden and McConnell occurred early Monday morning, at 12.45am and 6.30am, and quotes a McConnell spokesman:

The leader and the VP continued their discussion late into the evening and will continue to work toward a solution. More info as it becomes available.

Updated at 10.41am ET

10.10am ET

‘Dairy cliff’ approaches sell-by date

Aside from the fiscal cliff, what about the so-called “dairy cliff,” the possibility of a sharp hike in the price of milk if a new farm bill isn’t passed quickly?

There was some positive movement over the weekend, when leaders in both parties on the House and Senate agriculture committees agreed on a one-year extension of the previous farm bill.

But hold on, what’s this? Via AP:

A spokesman for House Speaker John Boehner said Sunday that Republican leaders had not decided how they would proceed on the farm extension, though a vote could come as soon as Monday.

Oh well, so much for that outbreak of bipartisanship. It turns out the House GOP is also considering two other extensions: a one-month extension and an even smaller bill that would merely extends the current policy that expires on 1 January.

Update: ‘Diary cliff’? Yes we only have a few hours left to get our 2013 calendars (hat tip: @Mattywills). Anyway, dairy cliff…

Updated at 10.31am ET

9.54am ET

Is Obama caving in to the Republicans?

Is President Obama giving away too much? In New York magazine, Jonathan Chait fears that Obama is caving in to the Republicans on taxes, and wants a stiffer backbone:

[Obama] is allowing Republicans to whittle down the sum by essentially threatening to shoot themselves in the head. And this is the most ominous thing about it. The big meta question looming over Obama’s term is whether he has learned to grapple with Republican political hostage-taking. Hostage-taking is not simply aggressive or even irrational negotiating. It is the specific tactic of extracting concessions by threatening to withhold support for policies you yourself endorse, simply because your opponent cares more about the damage.

9.49am ET

The effects of the budget cuts contained within the fiscal cliff could be felt in short order on the US military, as the Associated Press reports:

A senior defense official said if the sequester were triggered, the Pentagon would soon begin notifying its 800,000 civilian employees that they should expect some furloughs — mandatory unpaid leave, not layoffs. It would then take some time for the furloughs to begin being implemented, said the official, who requested anonymity because the official was not authorized to discuss the internal preparations.

9.43am ET

Deal or no deal? Where the two sides differ

So where are the two sides at this point? Based on various reports, here’s where things stood at the end of the weekend in talks between Senate republicans, Democrats and the White House.

• Income tax: Senate Republicans propose higher taxes on incomes above $450,000. Democrats propose tax rises on incomes over $360,000

• Estate tax: Republicans want to tax inheritances valued above $5m at 35%. Democrats want to tax inheritances above $3.5m at 45%

• Budget cuts: a “pause” before implementing the across-the-board cuts demanded by the sequester – Democrats in favour, Republicans oppose

• Spending: Proposals to avoid a cut in Medicare payments to doctors and extend benefits for the long-term unemployed – Republicans say they should be paid for through budget cuts elsewhere

• Alternative minimum tax: Democrats want any deal to include a permanent revision to stop the AMT hitting middle class taxpayers

Updated at 9.48am ET

9.30am ET

With only hours remaining until midnight, can America’s political system avert the fiscal cliff of tax hikes and sweeping budget cuts before 2013 is ushered in?

Congress reconvenes this morning after hopes of a deal between the Democratic and Republican leaders in the Senate over the weekend, came to naught. The talks faltered after Republicans threw up a string of objections – leading the Republican Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell to open a new line of dialogue with vice president Joe Biden.

Harry Reid, the Senate majority leader, left the field yesterday evening, telling journalists “Talk to Joe Biden and McConnell” as his farewell remark.

Congress went home for the night soon after. But there was some progress, based on reports leaking out of the two caucuses. The New York Times reported:

On some of the biggest sticking points, the two sides are now inches apart. Barely a week after House Republicans refused to vote to allow taxes to rise on incomes over $1m, Senate Republicans proposed allowing tax rates to rise on incomes over $450,000 for singles and $550,000 for couples. Democrats countered with a proposal to extend expiring Bush-era tax cuts up to $360,000 for singles, $450,000 for couples. For both sides, that meant major movement. Mr Obama has been holding firm at a $250,000 threshold.

Despite that shift, Republicans first insisted that a new measure of inflation, known as “chained CPI”, be used to calculate future – and slower – increases in social security payments. Democrats rejected that but the Republicans produced a new objection, based on the putative deal’s delay of the severe budget cuts that form one half of the feared fiscal cliff.

President Obama weighed in via an appearance on NBC’s Meet The Press on Sunday morning, blaming Republicans intransigence for their failure to reach a deal:

We have been talking to the Republicans ever since the election was over. They have had trouble saying yes to a number of repeated offers.

We’ll be bringing you all the action or inaction as the clock ticks down. It could be a late night.

Updated at 10.59am ET

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