eurozone

Rolling coverage of the world’s financial markets, including disappointing results from the weak eurozone inflation report. Investors still seem nervous after Monday’s rout. Eurozone inflation gauge stubbornly stuck at just 0.2% y/y in December…

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “European markets still fragile after euro inflation gloom – business live” was written by Graeme Wearden (until 2.15) and Nick Fletcher, for theguardian.com on Tuesday 5th January 2016 15.20 UTC

Given the backdrop of disappointing Chinese data and growing tensions in the Middle East, this week’s US main economic events – the minutes of the Federal Reserve’s rate-rising meeting and Friday’s non-farm payroll figures – will be closely watched. Christopher Vecchio, currency analyst at DailyFX, said:

Weak economic data from across the globe – particularly China and the Euro-Zone – has the US dollar on stronger footing ahead of key event risk this week. Despite some alarming signs coming from the US economy (soft consumption figures, mixed housing data, and recession-level industrial production), investors and traders alike remain focused on ‘the big picture’: how fast will the Federal Reserve tighten policy this year?

With the December Federal Open Market Committee minutes due on Wednesday and the December US non-farm payrolls report due on Friday, market participants – short- or long-term in nature alike – will have a fresh look at where the Fed stands…

Minutes of the last Federal Reserve meeting due on Wednesday.
Minutes of the last Federal Reserve meeting due on Wednesday. Photograph: Richard Drew/AP

Parsing the FOMC minutes and reviewing the details of the December labor reports should help provide enough clarity for judgement to be made on “who is wrong”: either the market, currently pricing in two rates hikes for this year (via Fed funds futures); or the Fed, currently suggesting it will hike rates four times this year.

In the event that the FOMC meeting and the US non-farm payrolls prove to be supportive of the US dollar, it will likely come at the detriment of higher yielding currencies and risk-correlated assets. Any signs that the Fed could tighten policy faster than currently expected, against a backdrop of rising tensions between Iran and Saudi Arabia as well as Chinese/emerging market growth concerns, would seem like a caustic mix of influences for the commodity currency bloc in particular.

US markets edge higher

Wall Street has followed other global markets in attempting to stage a rebound after Monday’s China-induced rout. But as in Europe, the rally is rather tentative.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up 42 points or 0.2% in early trading, while the S&P 500 has opened 0.16% better and Nasdaq is 0.3% higher.

In Europe, the FTSE 100 is currently up 0.79% while Germany’s Dax has added 0.33% and France’s Cac has climbed 0.48%.

Oil prices remain under pressure, on fears of falling demand in the wake of the poor Chinese data seen over the past few days. A stronger US dollar is not helping matters, since it makes holding dollar-denominated commodities more expensive. These factors are outweighing the growing tensions in the Middle East – especially between Saudi Arabia and Iran – which could hinder supply.

So Brent crude is currently down 1.2% at $36.77 a barrel, while WTI is nearly 1% lower at $36.40.

Accountancy group ICAEW reckons that British businesses are actually more worried about the domestic situation, rather than problems in China.

A survey of its members found that the the UK economy is the number one concern for 2016.

However, they’re less concerned about the eurozone economy, geopolitics, or the looming referendum on Britain’s membership of the European Union.

Here’s the details:

  • 41% of businesses feel that the growing uncertainty around the UK’s position in the EU could have a negative impact, compared with 50% a year ago
  • Businesses are less concerned about the negative impact of low economic growth in the Eurozone than they were two years ago (44% v 56% in 2014). Although exporters are displaying the same concern than they did last year, with 60% expecting a negative impact.
  • Low UK inflation is expected to have a positive impact on over a third of companies (36%) but over half (52%) would be negatively impacted by any interest rate rise in 2016
  • Instability in the Middle East and Ukraine is much less of a concern to business with 29% of respondents expecting a negative impact (down from 41%).

Midday summary: Markets remain nervous

Time for a quick recap.

European stock markets remain fragile today, after an early attempt to rally back from Monday’s slump floundered.

The main bourses are mixed as traders snatch lunch in the City. The German and French markets are down around 0.5%, while Britain’s FTSE 100 is managing a slight recovery, up 18 point, having been 70 points higher in early trading.

European stock markets, 1pm today
European stock markets, 1pm today Photograph: Thomson Reuters

Investors are bruised following yesterday’s slump, which was the worst start to a trading year since the dot-com crash.

China remains a big worry today.

Overnight, Chinese authorities intervened to prevent another slump on the Shanghai market. State-backed authorities bought up shares, in a bid to prop up values.

This helped the Chinese market to end the day roughly where it started. However, the intervention may also shows that Beijing is worried about future problems, given its slowing economy and the build-up of bad debts since the financial crisis began.

Chris Beauchamp of IG sums up the morning:

Early optimism on the London market has faded as investors continue to fret about the situation in Chinese markets. As in August, state-directed buying of stocks is competing with individual selling of equities, but China’s latest attempt to ‘buck the market’ is likely to end as well as its efforts last year.

The butterfly effect has been felt in Europe again this morning, with an initial bounce giving way to more selling, while in London the FTSE is fighting hard to hold on to small gains.

While Mike van Dulken of Accendo Markets warns:

…the prospect of another Summer-style Chinese rout (the one which made the Fed hold off from hiking) remains a real possibility.

There is disappointment that eurozone inflation remains at just 0.2%, despite the ECB’s stimulus measures.

And there’s also drama in the City. with Sainsbury’s threatening to pounce on Home Retail, the firm behind Argos and Homebase….

….while the unusually warm weather has hurt sales at high street chain Next:

Updated

If Sainsbury takes over Home Retail, it will reunite the company with the homes-and-gardens chain Homebase after a 15-year break.

Sainsbury’s reveals rejected takeover offer for Home Retail

Big news in the City….. supermarket chain Sainsbury’s has revealed that it made a takeover approach to Home Retail (which owns Argos and Homebase).

The offer was made, and rejected, in November, Sainsbury says. It is now considering its position, and has until February 2 to make a new bid.

Rumours have been swirling for weeks that Home Retail could be a takeover target. Sainsbury’s decision to out itself as a possible bidder has send Home Retail shares soaring, up 30%.

dec05hffina
Home Retails’ share price today Photograph: Thomson Reuters

More here:

William Hobbs, head of investment strategy at Barclays Plc’s wealth-management unit in London, sums up the situation well — it’s “really messy” in the markets right now.

He told Bloomberg that investors around the globe are on edge today, and fearing trouble ahead.

“Not much is expected of the world in terms of growth, risk appetite is biased to the downside and weak data from China to the U.S. hasn’t helped at all.

Plenty of people out there believe that the next global recession is imminent.”

US stock markets are expected to post fresh losses today, when they open in three hours time.

The Dow Jones industrial average is tipped to fall by around 100 points, adding to Monday’s 276 point slide.

The euro has lost ground against the US dollar since December’s inflation figures came out. It’s down over half a cent at $1.076.

Although eurozone inflation is clearly weak, it may not be bad enough to force more stimulus out of the European Central Bank, argues Teunis Brosens of ING.

While headline inflation was stuck at 0.2%, core inflation (stripping out energy and food) was also unchanged at 0.9% in December.

Brosens says:

Hawks may argue that weak core inflation is unsurprising given the still high unemployment in many Eurozone countries. Moreover, despite this month’s weakening of core inflation, the presence of second-round effects is not yet convincing.

We think that the ECB will hold its fire for now: it will take more convincing evidence of second round effects or other really disappointing economic news to stir the ECB into further action.

And that’s why shares have fallen back this morning:

So much for the bounce-back. European stock markets couldn’t even stay in the green until London’s pubs opened for the day.

The weak eurozone inflation reading has helped to pull the major indices into the red for the second day running.

The German Dax has shed another 1%, on top of Monday’s 4% slump. The Paris CAC is down another 0.8%, and London’s FTSE 100 is off eight points.

Ipek Ozkardeskaya of City firm London Capital Group says China is still worrying investors, even though Beijing’s central bank, the People’s Bank of China, stepped in overnight to prop up its stock market.

She writes that market sentiment is “very much fragile”:

The apocalyptic Chinese story keeps the headlines busy. The intervention from the PBoC eased tensions at the heart of the storm, yet the chaotic start to 2016 warned of a challenging year ahead of us. The first trading day of the year has clearly wiped away some of the optimism and the risk-off flows dominate.

Shanghai’s Composite opened the day 3.1% lower yet managed to recover later in the session. State-controlled funds bought equities to halt the $590bn worth of sell-off suffered on Monday, and a selling ban for investors would extend beyond a week according to several sources.

Updated

The European Central Bank will be concerned that inflation remained so low last month, says Howard Archer of IHS Global Insight:

Good news for Eurozone consumers but a headache for the ECB as consumer price inflation remained down at 0.2% in December, thereby defying expectations of a small uptick.

The failure of Eurozone inflation to pick up in December is good news for consumers’ purchasing power; but it will maintain ECB concern that prolonged very low inflation could lead to a renewed weakening in inflation expectations thereby making it harder still to get Eurozone consumer price inflation up to its target rate of close to 2%.

December’s unexpectedly weak inflation report is hurting the euro.

The single currency has hit its lowest level against the yen since April 2015. One euro is now worth ¥128.03, down from ¥129.33 earlier.

Eurozone inflation weaker than expected

Breaking: inflation across the eurozone remained uncomfortably weak last month.

Prices across the single currency region rose by just 0.2% annually in December, Eurostat has just reported.

That matches November’s reading, and dashes hopes of a rise to 0.3% or 0.4%.

Cheaper energy costs are partly to blame….. but food and service price inflation did also slow last month:

Eurostat says:

Food, alcohol & tobacco is expected to have the highest annual rate in December (1.2%, compared with 1.5% in November), followed by services (1.1%, compared with 1.2% in November), non-energy industrial goods (0.5%, stable compared with November) and energy (-5.9%, compared with -7.3% in November).

Eurozone inflation

The European Central Bank is meant to maintain inflation close to, but below, 2% — but we’re a long way from that despite the ECB’s quantitative easing stimulus measures….

Updated

UK building firms post stronger growth

UK standard building brick. Image shot 05/2006. Exact date unknown.<br />AWJRH5 UK standard building brick. Image shot 05/2006. Exact date unknown.

Britain’s builders didn’t get much rest over Christmas, judging by the latest healthcheck from the sector.

Data firm Markit reports that output jumped last month, pushing its PMI index up to 57.8 in December, up from a seven-month low of 55.3. That suggests the sector grew at a faster pace last month.

jan05pminew

Markit cited “favourable demand conditions”, with builders reporting that clients were more willing to commit to new projects.

Commercial construction had a particularly good month, with growth hitting its fastest rate since October 2014.

The unusually warm weather in December may also be a factor, as Britain didn’t suffer the kind of heavy snowfalls that can scupper construction work this time of year.

Firms who can build flood defences could be busy in 2016 too, as communities across the country try to shore themselves up.

Updated

This morning’s rally is looking a little fragile, after less than 90 minutes.

European stock markets have shed much of their early gains, and are now broadly flat.

European stock markets

Invesotrs

German unemployment beats expectations

German chancellor Merkel visits China<br />30 Oct 2015, Hefei, Anhui Province, China --- German Chancellor Angela Merkel looks on under a German and a Chinese national flag as she visits the German Academy at the University of Hefei in Hefei, China, 30 October 2015. Merkel is on a two-day official visit to China. Photo: Soeren Stache/dpa --- Image by © Soeren Stache/dpa/Corbis

Here comes the latest measure of German unemployment….. and it’s better than expected.

The number of people out of work across Germany fell by 14,000 last month, on a seasonally-adjusted basis. That smashes expectations of a 6,000 drop, and shows Germany is still outperforming many neighbours.

This leaves its unemployment rate unchanged at 6.3%, compared to a eurozone average of 10.7%.

Spain has also reported that its jobless total shrank by 8% last year:

Updated

Mining stocks are leading this morning’s rally in London.

Commodity giant Glencore is up over 4%, as fears over China ease a little (for the moment….)

Top risers on the FTSE 100
Top risers on the FTSE 100 today Photograph: Thomson Reuters

Tony Cross of Trustnext Direct says traders are taking their cue from Asia:

London’s FTSE-100 has recovered some of yesterday’s losses at the open, thanks in no small part to the fact that Asian equity markets appear to have stabilised overnight – at least for now.

The vast majority of blue chips are trading in positive territory although the handful of losing stocks are being dominated by clothing retailers with that trading update from Next this morning providing little reason to get excited about the sector.

Updated

High street chain Debenhams’ shares have fallen by 2% in early trading.

That reflects concerns that Next’s weak sales over Christmas could be mirrored across the sector. Marks & Spencer are down 0.5%.

Shares in Next are out of fashion this morning.

They’re down by 3% at the start of trading, leading the FTSE fallers, as the City digests this morning’s disappointing Christmas trading.

Here’s some reaction:

Updated

Market open: European shares bounce back

Shares are rallying across Europe at the start of trading, as investors recover their nerve after Monday’s heavy selloff.

In London, the FTSE 100 has jumped by 72 points, or 1.2%, to 6165 points. That claws back almost half of yesterday’s rout, when the blue-chip index shed 148 points.

The French CAC, German DAX, Spanish IBEX and Italian FTSE MIB are all up around 1.1%.

Yesterday, the DAX slumped by over 4%, so today’s rally is only a partial recovery.

Traders are encouraged by the news that Chinese authorities took action overnight to prevent their stock market tumbling again.

Jasper Lawler, market analyst at CMC Markets, explains:

In the aftermath of a global sell-off over China growth fears, UK and European stock index futures are taking their cues from the Chinese stock market on Tuesday.

After an initial wobble, shares in Shanghai and Shenzhen turned positive on Tuesday thanks to an injection of liquidity from the People’s Bank of China.

Next blames warm weather for weak Christmas

Next results<br />File photo dated 04/12/12 of a Next Retail store, as the High Street chain blamed unseasonably warm weather for a “disappointing” performance in the run-up to Christmas as it posted a fall in store sales and sharp slowdown in its Directory business. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday January 5, 2016. The retailer said full-price sales fell 0.5% across its stores in the 60 days to December 24, while sales across its Next Directory online and catalogue arm lifted 2%. See PA story CITY Next. Photo credit should read: Paul Faith/PA Wire

High street retailer Next has sent a shiver through the sector this morning, after posting weaker than expected results for the crucial Christmas period.

Full price sales rose by just +0.4% from 26 October to 24 December. That’s a serious slowdown, as Next sales grew by 6% between July and September.

And as Next is the first major European retailer to report Christmas trading figures, this may mean more trouble ahead…

Next pinned much of the blame on the unusually warm weather this autumn. This is a classic excuse for British retailers, who can often point to the skies to explain away a poor performance.

But to give Next credit, it also released a graph showing how sales did indeed shrink in weeks where the temperature was hotter than in 2014:

Next sales

And the weather isn’t the only culprit. The firm also admits that its catalogue shopping arm, NEXT Directory’s, suffered poor stock availability from October onward.

Updated

Spread-betting firm IG is predicting that European markets will bounce back when trading begins in a few minutes, clawing back some of Monday’s losses.

IG is calling the main markets up around 1%:

Chinese authorities intervene to prop up markets

Chinese shares make modest gains after Monday rout<br />epa05088128 Chinese investors look at a screen showing stock movements at a stock brokerage house in Beijing, China, 05 January 2016. Shares in China made modest gains 05 January morning, the day after a plunge in the market triggered a halt to trading. The CSI 300 Index was up 0.79 per cent when the market shut for its lunch break. The index comprises 300 shares from the biggest companies on the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges. EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG
Chinese investors look at a screen showing stock movements at a stock brokerage house in Beijing. Photograph: How Hwee Young/EPA

It’s been a wild day in China, as Beijing tries to prevent a repeat of Monday’s rout.

Chinese authorities intervened in the markets today, buying up stocks to give investors confidence.

And it appears to have worked. The Shanghai composite index has closed for the day, down just 0.28%, having shed 3% at one stage today.

That’s rather better than Monday’s 7% slump, which forced trading to be halted.

That doesn’t address the underlying problems in China, such as the build-up of bad debts and its slowing economy. And it suggests Beijing isn’t prepared to allow market forces to take their natural course….

Updated

Introduction: Markets could stabilise after Monday’s rout

Good morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of the world economy, the financial markets, the eurozone and business.

It’s day two of the trading year, and investors around the globe will be hoping for a better performance than on day one.

There’s a nervous air in the markets today, after yesterday’s selloff wiped hundreds of billions of dollars off bourses worldwide. Britain’s FTSE 100 lost £38bn in a blink of an eye:

But unlike vanishing candyfloss, market value can reappear.

And European stock markets are expected to recover some ground today. But it could be another volatile session, with concerns over China’s economy looming over markets.

Also on the agenda today, we get the first estimate of eurozone inflation for December. Economists predict it will rise to an annual rate of 0.4%, from 0.2% in November.

We also get the latest German unemployment data for December, and an estimate of how UK builders fared last month.

  • 8.55am GMT: German unemployment report
  • 9.30am GMT: UK construction PMI
  • 10am: Eurozone inflation for December

And high street retailer Next is reporting its financial results for the last quarter. That will give us an insight into how the crucial Christmas trading season went…..

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2010

Published via the Guardian News Feed plugin for WordPress.


USA 

Disappointment as Germany, France and Italy only post modest growth, while Portugal stagnates and Finland continues to slow. Eurozone GDP misses expectations. France returns to growth, but analysts aren’t impressed. Germany hit by global problems…

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Eurozone GDP: Growth slows to just 0.3% – as it happened” was written by Graeme Wearden, for theguardian.com on Friday 13th November 2015 13.42 UTC

Closing summary: Weak eurozone growth puts pressure on ECB

Rather like April Fool’s Day, eurozone GDP day is best enjoyed before lunchtime. So here’s a summary:

Europe’s economic recovery has faltered, with growth in the single currency region slowing to just 0.3% in the third quarter of the year.

Weak international trade helped to drag back Germany and Italy, and limited France’s recovery too.

Only consumer spending came to Europe’s aid, with household expenditure providing much of the growth impetus.

The subdued performance raises the pressure on the European Central Bank to boost its stimulus programmes at its December meeting.

Nick Kounis, head of macro and financial markets research at ABN AMRO bank, called it the “final push” for the ECB to be decisive.

The day began with France returning to growth, with GDP up by 0.3%.

Finance minister Michel Sapin told AFP that France’s economy will grow “by at least 1.1 percent” for 2015 as a whole, adding he believed the country had “exited the period of extremely weak growth that had lasted too long”.

But analysts were less impressed, pointing out that France’s ran a large trade deficit during the quarter. Only stockpiling by companies prevented the economy shrinking.

Germany’s economy also grew by 0.3%, down from 0.4%. The economy ministry blamed weak trade; economists warned that emerging market slowdown is hurting.

Smaller nations didn’t fare well either, with Italy slowing to +0.2%, the Netherlands barely growing, and Portugal actually stagnating.

But Finland was the real shocker — living up to its reputation as the ‘sick man of Europe’ with a 0.6% contraction.

Finland GDP

Only Greece beat expectations – shrinking by a mere 0.5%, not the 1% expected. That tells you something about the accuracy of City forecasts, and the turmoil in the Greek economy this year. When a 0.5% contraction is ‘good news’, you know you’re been through the mire.

But it may mean that Greece’s economy ‘only’ stagnates during 2015.

That’s probably all for today. I’m off to fold up the Eurozone GDP Day banners, and finish up the party punch.

Thanks for reading and commenting; see you next week. GW

A double helping of halušky to Slovakia, which was the fastest-growing member of the eurozone in the last quarter.

But it’s cold potatoes for Finland, which posted the worst performance – even worse than a Greek economy gripped by capital controls:

Eurozone GDP chart

Eurozone GDP chart

Updated

Here’s our news story on today’s GDP figures (to save new readers scrolling back to 6.15am onwards):

The eurozone’s economy lost steam in the latest quarter as Portugal stalled, Germany slowed and debt-stricken Greece contracted.

Gross domestic product (GDP) across the 19 countries in the single currency bloc rose just 0.3% in the third quarter, according to Eurostat. That defied expectations for growth to hold at 0.4%, according to a Reuters poll of economists. On a year earlier, GDP was up 1.6%, lower than forecasts for 1.7%.

The July to September figures mark a slowdown from eurozone GDP growth of 0.4% in the second quarter and 0.5% in the first quarter and come as the European Central Bank (ECB) hints that it is planning to inject further funds into the eurozone economy to maintain recovery…..

Updated

Eurozone markets hit by GDP disappointment

European stock markets have been hit by the news that growth slowed across the eurozone in the last quarter.

The main indices are all in the red, adding to yesterday’s selloff:

European stock markets, November 13 2015

Conner Campbell of SpreadEX says the mood darkened as this morning’s data emerged.

Joining a decent French figure and sliding Germany growth were misses by Italy and the Netherlands. Even worse were the performances from Portugal and Finland; the former, so often pointed to as one of the region’s post-crisis success stories, saw no growth at all in the third quarter, whilst the latter, increasingly becoming one of the Eurozone’s most rotten appendages, actually saw its GDP contract by 0.6%.

Given region’s general malaise, the Eurozone as a whole was arguably lucky only to see a 0.1% decline quarter-on-quarter, with its Q3 figure coming in at a forecast-missing 0.3%. Understandably investors weren’t too pleased with these results, meaning even the spectre of more ECB QE (the likelihood of which only increased with this morning’s figures) couldn’t drag the DAX and CAC out of the red.

This chart shows how Italy, Portugal and the Netherlands all missed expectations this morning, dragging the eurozone growth rate down (via Bloomberg)

Eurozone GDP

Updated

At just 0.3%, the eurozone economy isn’t growing fast enough to pull unemployment down and drive demand, as Bloomberg economist Maxime Sbaihi explains:

The weakness of the eurozone recovery adds “to the already strong case for the ECB to step up monetary stimulus in December,” says Nick Kounis, head of macro research at ABN Amro Bank.

Kounis added that while Europe’s domestic economy is doing well, it is suffering from weak world trade and deteriorating export markets.

Cyprus has posted another quarter of growth, as its recovery from its 2013 bailout trauma continues.

Cypriot GDP rose by 0.5% in July-to-September, matching the growth in April-June.

That means Cyprus’s economy is now 2.2% larger than a year ago.

The eurozone’s recovery has “ disappointingly lost momentum for a second successive quarter”, says Howard Archer of IHS Global Insight.

The third-quarter slowdown in Eurozone GDP growth appears to have been largely the consequence of negative net trade (this was certainly true of Germany, France and Italy).

This suggests that the benefit to Eurozone exporters coming from the weak euro was offset by muted global growth. Meanwhile, relatively decent Eurozone domestic demand supported imports.

This chart shows how Greece’s economy went into reverse in the last quarter:

Greek GDP

Greek economy shrinks

Oxi Day celebrations, Athens, Greece - 28 Oct 2015<br />Mandatory Credit: Photo by Kostas Pikoulas/Pacific Pres/REX Shutterstock (5320493d) A Greek flag waves during the parade Oxi Day celebrations, Athens, Greece - 28 Oct 2015 Students parade celebrating the ‘’Oxi Day’’ during the 75th anniversary of Greece’s entering WWII, after denying the Italian ultimatum to enter Greek soil in 28th October 1940.

Today’s figures also show that Greece’s faltering recovery has been wiped out in the last three months.

Greek GDP contracted by 0.5% in the July-September quarter, Eurostat says, having risen by 0.4% in April-June.

That’s not a surprise, given the bailout drama this summer which saw banks shuttered and capital controls imposed.

And it’s actually less awful than feared — economists had forecast a 1% contraction:

Updated

Eurozone growth slows to 0.3%

Breaking: The eurozone economy grew by just 0.3% in the third quarter of the year.

That’s a slowdown on the 0.4% recorded three months earlier, showing that Europe’s recovery remains fragile and lacklustre despite the huge stimulus measures launched by the European Central Bank this year.

It’s also weaker than expected — economists had expected 0.4% growth.

Updated

Brussels officials have pointed to Portugal as an example that tough fiscal consolidation can deliver results. Today’s disappointing (no) growth figures may prompt a rethink….

Portugal’s economy stagnates

The national Portuguese flag is hoisted next to the Euro 2004 flag<br />epa000207050 The national Portuguese flag is hoisted next to the Euro 2004 flag as the England soccer squad arrives in Lisbon on Monday, 07 June 2004, for the Euro 2004 European soccer Championships. England will play their opening first round match against France on Sunday. EPA/JOAO RELVAS

More gloom. Portugal’s recovery ran out of steam in the last quarter, just as its political crisis escalates.

GDP was flat in the July-September quarter, after growing by 0.5% in the second quarter.

That’s much weaker than the 0.4% economists had expected, and looks like the weakest quarter in 18 months.

The Portuguese Stats Office says:

Comparing with the second quarter, GDP registered a null change rate in real terms in the third quarter (0.5% in the second quarter).

The contribution of domestic demand was negative, mainly due to the reduction of Investment, while net external demand contributed positively, with Imports of Goods and Services decreasing more intensely than Exports of Goods and Services.

On an annual basis, Portuguese GDP grew by 1.4%, down from 1.6% three month ago.

Portuguese GDP

This comes as Portugal’s left-wing parties vow to overturn its austerity programmes and implement more growth-friendly measures, having overturned its centre-right government this week.

Updated

We now have to wait until 10am GMT for the official eurozone-wide GDP reading for July-September.

But it’s already clear that this wasn’t a great quarter for Europe, with a weak trade performance dragging back the three largest eurozone economies.

Economist Fred Ducrozet reckons eurozone growth will fall short of the 0.4% expected, to 0.3%.

While City firm Abshire-Smith reckons the European Central Bank is under even more pressure to ease monetary policy:

Updated

Italy growth slows

Here comes Italy’s GDP report….and it’s weaker than hoped.

The Italian economy grew by just 0.2% in the third quarter of 2015, dashing expectations of a 0.3% expansion.

It suggests Italy’s recovery is running out of steam.

GDP rose by 0.4% in the first quarter of 2015, dipping to 0.3% in the second quarter – and now just 0.2% in Q3.

Finland’s economy has now been locked in a painful downturn for the last three years, as this chart from Statistics Finland shows:

Finnish GDP

That’s via fastFT, which warns:

Finland is used to cold, dark winters, and the experience could stand it in good stead as the Nordic country’s bitter economic cold snap shows no sign of a thaw.

Netherlands grows by just 0.1%

The Dutch flag flies outside the ING head office in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Monday Oct. 20, 2008.

Next up, the Netherlands…. and its economy struggled to grow in the last quarter.

GDP rose by just 0.1% in the July-September quarter, a very modest performance.

And second-quarter GDP has been revised down, to just +0.1% from +0.2% originally.

That left the economy 1.9% larger than a year ago, weaker than forecast.

Updated

‘Sick man’ Finland’s economy shrinks by 0.6%

Scandinavian Flags<br />ca. 1990s, Helsinki, Finland --- Scandinavian Flags --- Image by Joel W. Rogers/CORBIS

Finland has cemented its growing reputation as one of Europe’s most ailing members.

Finnish GDP contracted by 0.6% in the last quarter, according to new data this morning. That left Finland’s economy 0.8% smaller than a year ago.

The fall in natural resource prices, the demise of Nokia, and the knock-on impact of Russia’s economic problems are all hurting.

Having been one of the cheeleaders for eurozone austerity, Finland now finds itself in a very tough position. It is trying to cut spending to keep its deficit within the limits set by Brussels, which is hurting attempts to return to growth.

Two months ago, finance minister Alex Stubb admitted “we are the sick man of Europe.” Today’s figures don’t challenge that diagnosis.

Slovakia has outpaced its larger neighbours to the west, with growth of 0.9% in the last three months. That’s up from 0.8% in the second quarter.

The Czech Republic has beaten expectations, with growth of 0.5% in the last quarter.

City analysts have been chewing through France’s GDP figures, and they’re not too impressed.

RBC is concerned that inventory-building by companies provided much of the growth:

While Barclays says France’s economy is still vulnerable.

More data. Hungary has missed forecasts by posting annual growth of 2.3% in the last quarter, down from 2.7% three months earlier.

On a quarter-on-quarter basis, Hungary (which isn’t in the eurozone) grew by 0.5%.

Germany’s economy would be in a worse state if consumers weren’t benefiting from cheaper energy costs, points out Holger Sandte of Nordea Markets.

This morning’s figures show that Britain has outpaced its two largest European rivals in the last quarter.

UK GDP grew by 0.5% between July and September, data released last month showed.

That’s obviously better than France and Germany, and also beats America (which grew by around 0.4% in Q3).

Germany’s Statistics Office says that domestic spending was a key driver of growth, while overseas demand for German exports lagged behind:

“Private and public consumption both increased.”

“According to preliminary estimates, growth was held back by foreign trade because imports rose far more strongly than exports.”

Germany’s economy has been dented by problems overseas, says Carsten Brzeski of ING.

Here’s his quick take on today’s growth figures:

The summer weakness of the German industry seems to be more substantial than only a vacation-driven soft spell. The turmoil in emerging markets and the Chinese slowdown have finally left some marks on the German economy.

More generally, the German industry has not managed to accelerate and shift up one gear. Somehow, the weak euro and extremely favourable financing conditions have not fully deployed their full impact on the industry, yet. This is partly the result of weakening external demand but also still the structural lack of investment incentives and projects.

Consumer spending, though, is still strong. More here.

Updated

This German GDP report “isn’t overwhelming”, says Bloomberg’s Hans Nichols, but at least the its economy is still growing.

The slight slowdown in the last quarter suggests Germany has been hit by problems in emerging markets such as China.

And as these charts show, 2015 hasn’t been a vintage year for the German economy

German GDP

german Photograph: Bloomberg
german GDP

The German GDP report is online here.

Germany posts 0.3% growth

German chancellor Merkel visits China<br />30 Oct 2015, Hefei, Anhui Province, China --- German Chancellor Angela Merkel looks on under a German and a Chinese national flag as she visits the German Academy at the University of Hefei in Hefei, China, 30 October 2015. Merkel is on a two-day official visit to China. Photo: Soeren Stache/dpa --- Image by © Soeren Stache/dpa/Corbis

Here comes Germany’s GDP data…. and it shows that Europe’s largest economy grew by 0.3% in the last quarter.

That matches France’s performance, and is a slightly slowdown on the 0.4% recorded in April-June.

Germany’s stats office says that consumer and government spending both rose.

Trade had a negative impact on growth, though, with imports growing faster than exports….

Updated

French finance minister Michel Sapin has welcomed today’s GDP data.

He told AFP newswires that France has escaped a long period of very low growth.

Some reaction to the French GDP report:

French GDP: The details

France’s return to growth was driven by household spending (up 0.3%) and business investment (up 0.7%).

But the trade picture is quite ugly. Exports fell by 0.6%, while imports grew by 1.7%.

So net trade actually knocked 0.7% off GDP, but this was compensated by firms bolstering their inventories.

Without that, the figures look worse.

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The French GDP report is online here.

Updated

Bloomberg TV flags up that the French economy has generally been sluggish over the few quarters, apart from a healthy bounce at the start of this year:

French quarterly GDP

French GDP over the last five quarters Photograph: Bloomberg

France’s economy is now 1.2% larger than a year ago, slightly better than the 1.1% annual growth economists expected.

French economy growing again – GDP up 0.3%

Close-up of French flag<br />A63GGC Close-up of French flag

France has got eurozone GDP day up and running by returning to growth.

French GDP increased by 0.3% in the last quarter, the INSEE stats office reports.

That follows zero growth in the April-June quarter, which fuelled fears that the French economy was stalling.

Updated

Introduction: Eurozone growth figures released

Hang out the bunting and put on the party hats, folks. It’s eurozone GDP day!

We’re about to discover how countries across Europe performed in the third quarter of 2015, from heavyweights like Germany and France to smaller members like Slovakia and Portugal.

Actually, you shouldn’t blow up too many balloons, because we’re probably going to learn that Europe’s recovery remains jammed in second gear.

Economists predict that the eurozone expanded by just 0.4% in the July-to-September quarter. That would match the performance in the second quarter of the year. Better than a recession, but not rapid enough to deal with Europe’s persistent unemployment and debt problems.

EU, eurozone and US growth compared

EU, eurozone and US growth compared Photograph: Eurostat

A poor number today would suggest that Europe has been hit harder than we thought by problems in emerging markets over the summer. It may also show the impact of the Greek bailout crisis on the region.

But anything stronger than 0.4% would be welcome.

The data will also influence whether the European Central Bank feels forced into taking fresh action to stimulate the eurozone economy – a boost to its bond-buying QE programme is already looking likely.

Here’s how the morning should unfold:

  • France: 6.30am GMT / 7.30am CET
  • Germany: 7am GMT / 8am CET
  • Hungary: 8am GMT / 9am CET
  • Romania: 8am GMT / 9am CET
  • Czech Republic: 8am GMT / 9am CET
  • The Netherlands: 8.30am GMT / 9.30am CET
  • Italy: 9am GMT / 10am CET
  • Portugal: 9,30am GMT / 10.30am CET
  • Greece: 10am GMT / 11am CET
  • The eurozone: 10am GMT / 11am CET

Updated

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World’s second largest economy continues to see slowing growth. Chinese GDP growth at six year low, but central bank unlikely to cut rates says economist. Weak European construction output. ECB likely to leave QE unchanged at next meeting…

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Markets mixed despite better than expected Chinese GDP – business live” was written by Nick Fletcher, for theguardian.com on Monday 19th October 2015 12.20 UTC

Here’s a full report on Oprah Winfrey’s deal with Weight Watchers:

Meanwhile Weight Watchers shares have jumped around 40% in pre-market trading following the news that Oprah Winfrey will invest and join the board.

That’s a nice return already on her investment.

Morgan Stanley earnings drop more than 42%

More news from the US, and Wall Street bank Morgan Stanley has just reported a 42.4% fall in third quarter earnings to $939m.

It was hit by turbulence in bond, currency and commodity markets following the concerns about the Chinese economy.

Oprah Winfrey takes stake in Weight Watchers

Over in the US, Oprah Winfrey has linked up with Weight Watchers International, buying a 10% stake in the business – with an option for another 5% – and is joining the board.

Winfrey said: “I believe in the program so much I decided to invest in the company and partner in its evolution.”

Oprah.

Oprah. Photograph: Splash News/Corbis

Updated

China could overtake Europe for trade in 20 years – survey

As Chinese president Xi Jinping begins his state visit to the UK, British people expect China to overtake Europe as our most valuable trading partner in 20 years. A poll by YouGov also shows Brits are enthusiastic about closer economic co-operation with the Chinese.

Of those surveyed, 40% said our most valuable trading partner was Europe, with 23% choosing China. But in the next two decades this is expected to change, with 29% predicting China will be our top partner and 22% forecasting it will still be Europe.

UK trade partners.

UK trade partners. Photograph: YouGov/YouGov

Nearly half – 43% – said the UK should be seeking closer trading links with China, with 31% saying it should continue the current level of economic co-operation and only 8% saying it should weaken ties.

Closer trade with China?

Closer trade with China? Photograph: YouGov/YouGov

The majority – 54% – believed China would to continue into the next two decades with either much stronger economic growth than now (22%) or slightly stronger growth than now (32%). Only 14% predicted weaker growth. In addition, 37% expected China’s growth to lift the UK’s, while 26% said it wouldcome at the expense of western economies and 10% said it would not make any difference.

But YouGov added:

The British public seems to have a pragmatic approach to economic relations with China, but there is not much evidence of great affection for the country. Of the 12 biggest economies by GDP excluding the USA and those in Europe, China comes in at 8th in terms of net positive impressions (29% positive, 55% negative).

Ireland moves to reduce need for one and two cent coins

Ireland has moved to cut back on one and two cent coins, with plans to launch a nationwide scheme to allow retailers to round bills to the nearest five cents – with the consent of shoppers. PA reports:

Since the euro was introduced in 2001 Ireland has spent €37m issuing one and two cent coins – minting the coppers at three times the rate of the rest of the eurozone.

But the initiative to reduce the need for coppers is voluntary and consumers will retain the right to pay the exact bill and request their exact change.

The Central Bank insisted rounding would only apply to cash transactions and not to credit card, electronic or cheque payments and it would also only be used on the final cash total of a bill and not to individual goods.

As examples it said final bills ending in one and two cents or six and seven cents would be rounded down to the nearest five and those ending in three and four cents or eight and nine cents would be rounded up.

Other rules on the rounding scheme include that one and two cent coins remain legal tender.

The nationwide initiative starts on October 28.

It follows a successful trial in Wexford in 2013, which showed that 85% of consumers and 100% of retailers in Wexford who expressed an opinion wanted rounding rolled out nationally.

Ireland to cut back on one and two cent coins.

Ireland to cut back on one and two cent coins. Photograph: Chris Bacon/PA

Back to China, and the weak GDP figures show that the stimulus measures introduced by the country’s central bank have had a limited effect, said Professor Kamel Mellahi at Warwick Business School. He said:

If there is one thing to take away from the third quarter figures it is the limited short-term impact of financial and economic stimulus packages on the Chinese economy. The Chinese Government has introduced a number of measures to stimulate economic growth, but so far the needle hasn’t moved much.

Right now it’s very important the Chinese Government is focused on the long-term economic fundamentals and resists the temptation to take unnecessary actions simply to meet short-term economic growth targets.

One cannot, and should not, read too much into the third quarter growth figures. A growth of 6.9% is slightly below official government expectations but they are also marginally better than the 6.8% that most economists have predicted. Because it’s the weakest growth since 2009, the figures are very symbolic but I don’t think they tell us something substantially new about the state of the Chinese economy.

The 0.2% fall in eurozone construction in August compared to July was due to civil enginering declining by 0.3% and building construction by 0.2%, according to statistics office Eurostat.

In the wider European Union, construction output fell by 1.2% month on month.

The year on year decline in the euro area was 6% and in the EU as a whole 5%.

The full report is here:

Production in construction down by 0.2% in euro area

Decline in European construction.

Decline in European construction. Photograph: Eurostat/Eurostat

Weaker European construction output

Eurozone construction output came in weaker in August, new figures have just revealed:

Updated

Chinese GDP does not tell the whole story

More on the Chinese figures and their accuracy or otherwise. Real growth could be closer to 3% to 4% according to Russ Mould, investment director at broker AJ Bell. He said:

Chinese headline GDP growth looks healthy at 6.9% but underlying metrics suggest the real growth rate could be nearer 3% – 4%. If you look at growth in rail cargo traffic, electricity consumption and demand for loans, three metrics favoured by Prime Minister Li, the picture is not so healthy.

Credit growth still looks promising but freight shipments and electricity demand growth look to be sagging, so the so-called Li Keqiang index does raise a few questions.

Today’s GDP figures are encouraging but investors with exposure to China should still expect some bumps and lumps along the way.

Chinese growth slows

Chinese growth slows Photograph: AJ Bell / Thomson Reuters Datastream/AJ Bell / Thomson Reuters Datastream

One of the disadvantages of being a stock market index laden with commodity companies is that the sector often has a disproportionate influence on events.

So it is today. With the weak Chinese data mining companies have come under pressure on concerns about slowing demand from the world’s second largest economy. With the likes of Anglo American and Glencore down between 2% and 4%, this means the FTSE 100 has slipped back into negative territory, while other European markets are still moving higher.

Chris Beauchamp, senior market analyst at IG, said:

Overall growth in China in the third quarter was a respectable 6.9%, while strength in consumer spending will allay some fears about a slowdown. However, the figures will do nothing to dispel the idea that this particular growth bonanza has come to an end.

Big name mining stocks are in the red again this morning, with the sector at its lowest level in nearly two weeks. It looks increasingly like the bounce of early October was a false dawn, and barring some kind of sustained revival in risk appetite, perhaps via fresh monetary stimulus, the sector is heading lower once again.

Mining shares fall

Mining shares fall Photograph: Reuters/Reuters

ECB expected to leave QE unchanged this week

One of the main economic events this week is the latest meeting of the European Cental Bank, due to take place in Malta.

Despite the weakness of the global economy and continued low inflation, the bank is widely expected to keep its quantitive easing programme unchanged but suggest it is ready to act further if necessary. Many economists believe an expansion of the programme – which involves €60bn of asset purchases a month and is due to run until at least September 2016 – could be unveiled in December.

ECB board member Ewald Nowotny said it was too early to discuss changing the programme in one of a couple of interviews over the weekend and today. He said (quote from Reuters):

In my view it’s too early to talk about (adjusting the asset purchases) because we still have almost a year of the programme ahead of us.

Economists at RBC Capital Markets said:

[Nowotny] remarked that Fed policy was not a “decisive aspect” in ECB decision-making, and that one should also not overestimate the impact of a slowdown in China. His more hawkish tone contrasts with the dovish tenor to his remarks from last week, where he acknowledged the clear weakness in domestic inflationary trends.

Nowotny said in a separate interview that the ECB has to show it is in control of inflation but governments may need to loosen fiscal policies to boost growth. He said it was too early to determine long term inflation trends, with low oil and commodity prices at the moment having a strong influence.

The service sector is now the biggest part of the Chinese economy:

One of the shares pushing the German market higher is Deutsche Bank.

It has jumped more than 3% after unveiling plans over the weekend to split its investment bank in two, and removing a number of top executives as part of an overhaul by chief executive John Cryan. Earlier this month the bank announced a record loss of €6bn in the third quarter.

The full story is here:

Updated

European markets are now making a better fist of it after an uncertain start, as traders take a more positive view of the Chinese data (it was disappointing but not as bad as expected).

The FTSE 100 is up 0.2%, Germany’s Dax has added 0.9% and France’s Cac is up 0.8%.

Markets

Markets recover after Chinese data Photograph: Reuters/Reuters

Greek creditors to examine reforms this week

Over in Greece, and the country’s creditors will be reviewing its finances and the progress of reforms to release the next tranche of the €2bn rescue package. The move follows the successful passing of measures through parliament early on Saturday, despite protests against the package.

Finance minister Euclid Tsakalotos and prime minister Alexis Tsipras in parliament on Friday.

Finance minister Euclid Tsakalotos and prime minister Alexis Tsipras in parliament on Friday. Photograph: Panayiotis Tzamaros/NurPhoto/Corbis

Greek newspaper Kathimerini reports:

Representatives of Greece’s lenders – the European Commission, the European Central Bank, the European Stability Mechanism and the International Monetary Fund – are expected to return to Athens on Tuesday to start a review that, Greece hopes, will end successfully, paving the way for the launch of talks on debt relief.

The auditors are to scour Greece’s finances too, following the presentation of the draft budget. Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos is expected to request flexibility, arguing that the recession estimates in the draft budget – 2.3% of gross domestic product this year and 1.3% next year – are overly pessimistic.

His aim is to eliminate some of the more contentious austerity measures that Greece has suspended, such as plans for a 23% value added tax on private schools and higher taxes on rental income.

As regards pension reform, another controversial issue, the government is keen to convince creditors to allow the inclusion of certain prior actions in a broader overhaul of the pension system, to come later.

As regards the €2bn loan tranche, the Euro Working Group is to convene on Wednesday and may recommend the immediate release of the money or may ask Greece to legislate more actions from the first list of prior actions.

The full report is here.

Protesters at a rally in front of the Greek parliament in Athens as MPs voted for reforms.

Protesters at a rally in front of the Greek parliament in Athens as MPs voted for reforms. Photograph: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images

Despite the weak Chinese numbers, Tim Condon at ING Bank believes the Chinese central bank is unlikely to cut interest rates any further. He said:

The third quarter GDP data on its own implies a revision in our full-year forecast to 6.9% from 6.8%. However, our previous forecast was based on an acceleration in fourth quarter growth from reduced financial market turbulence and the impact of the stimulus implemented in response to the turbulence. We think the argument still applies and we are revising our full-year forecast to 7.0% (Bloomberg consensus 6.8%).

We see the September economic data, including the money and credit data released last week, as enabling the PBOC to remain on hold. We are revising our forecast of one 25 basis point policy interest cut in the current quarter to no more cuts.

We retain our forecast of one more cut in the reserve ratio requirement [the amount of cash that lenders must hold as reserves] in the current quarter to sterilize the impact of hot money outflows on interbank liquidity.

Shire falls on drug disappointment

One of the biggest UK fallers so far is pharmaceutical group Shire.

Its shares are down 1.8% after the US Food and Drug Administration said late on Friday that it would not approve the company’s new dry eye drug, lifitegrast, based on current data. Chief executive Flemming Ornskov said he was disappointed but still hoped to launch the treatment in 2016. If results from a new phase 3 trial due by the end of the year are positive, Shire planned to refile a submission to the FDA in the first quarter of 2016. Ornskov said:

We are committed to working with FDA to expeditiously provide the evidence required to deliver a new prescription treatment option for the 29 million adults in the US living with the symptoms of this chronic and progressive disease. This is an area of unmet medical need for which there has been no new FDA-approved treatment in over a decade.

European markets make a mixed start

The weak Chinese GDP data has seen European shares get off to an uncertain start for the week.

The FTSE 100 is up 0.15% but Germany’s Dax, France’s Cac and Spain’s Ibex have dipped 0.2%.

In China itself, the Shanghai composite has ended down 0.1% at 3386.7 points.

Oil prices have edged lower on renewed concerns about a lack of demand amid a supply glut, with Brent crude down 0.48% at $50.22 a barrel.

ITV buys television assets of Northern Irish broadcaster UTV

On the corporate front, ITV has agreed to pay £100m for the television business of Northern Irish broadcaster UTV in a long expected deal.

It means the long-gestating consolitation of the independent television network is getting into its final stages, with 13 of the 15 licences now in the hands of ITV. Analysts at Liberum:

We see the deal as a strategic plus, especially if ITV can charge retransmission revenues for the main channel where we expect more newsflow before Christmas. We reiterate ITV as our top pick in media sector.

More suggestions the official Chinese GDP figure may be an overestimation:

The Chinese data comes as the country’s president, Xi Jinping, begins his first official state visit to London.

There are likely to be deals signed and co-operation agreements made, but the visit is controversial. It is likely to be marked by protests against human rights abuses, and concerns that the UK may be jeopardising national security by allowing Chinese state companies to invest in British nuclear power plants.

And it comes amid increased wariness towards China by the US. More here:

In Asia the Shanghai Composite is currently down 0.48%, while the Nikkei is 0.88% lower and the Hang Seng is down 0.54%.

European markets are expected to make an uncertain start after the mixed messages from the Chinese data. Here are the opening forecasts from IG Index:

Chinese economic growth at a six year low

Good morning and welcome to our our rolling coverage of the world economy, the financial markets, the eurozone and the business world.

China is in the spotlight once more, with news of a slowdown in economic growth in the third quarter. The world’s second largest economy grew by 6.9%, compared to 7% in the previous quarter, and the lowest rate since the 6.2% recorded in 2009 during the global recession.

The figure was slightly better than the 6.7% expected by economists but is still likely to prompt concerns about the outlook. The government has cut interest rates five times since November, and further stimulus measures are expected in the wake of a continued slowdown.

Our full report is here:

Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets, said:

Last week’s China trade balance numbers showed that while exports improved slightly, the sharp drop in imports suggested that internal demand remains constrained by the weakness in commodity prices, as well as lower domestic consumption, raising concerns that the Chinese government could well find it difficult to hit its 7% GDP target for this year.

This morning’s Chinese Q3 GDP was expected to reinforce these concerns, but came in rather conveniently slightly better than markets had been expecting at 6.9%, and above some of the more pessimistic expectations of 6.7%.

While most people accept that China’s GDP numbers should only be taking at face value, due to concerns that it is artificially inflated, this number does seem surprisingly good given how weak some of the more recent individual data components have been.

This is borne out by a much bigger than expected drop in the September industrial production numbers, which came in at 5.7% and well below expectations of 6%, and well down from 6.1% in August, while Chinese retail sales saw an increase of 10.9%, only slightly higher than August’s 10.8%. Fixed asset investment also disappointed, coming in at 10.3%, down from 10.9% in August.

Economist Danny Gabay of Fathom Consulting echoed the scepticism about the Chinese figures. He told the Today programme: “The figures are produced remarkably quickly and rarely revised.” And he believes the real figure is closer to 3%.

Otherwise it appears a relatively quiet day so far, but we’ll be keeping an eye on all the latest developments.

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World markets at their highest since August as investors calculate that the US central bank won’t raise rates this month, and probably not until 2016. Eurozone inflation gauge dips back into negative territory, placing the euro under pressure…

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “World stock markets hit two-month highs as stimulus hopes build – business live” was written by Graeme Wearden (until 13.45) and Nick Fletcher, for theguardian.com on Friday 16th October 2015 13.21 UTC

US industrial production slips in September

Every piece of US data is now watched carefully to see how it might influence the US Federal Reserve in its interest rate policy.

But there is not too much to glean from the latest figures. US industrial production dipped 0.2% in September, in line with expectations. August’s figure was revised to show a 0.1% decline compared to the 0.4% fall originally reported.

Weakness in the oil and gas sector was mainly responsible for the fall.

Later comes the Michigan consumer confidence survey.

Now here’s an admission. Credit Suisse has said its clients have no idea what is going on out there in the markets. They are “lost and bearish.” The bank says:

Never have we seen so many clients who just do not know what is happening and have cashed up. US investors, in particular, were clearly cautious. European and especially Asian investors were more constructive.

Reasons for the bearishness: Global growth being at ‘growth recession’ levels, China, QE running out of steam, the rise in non-energy high yield credit spreads, the risk of the Fed policy mistake (with most clients believing, correctly in our opinion, that a December rate rise would be a policy mistake and see Yellen’s communication as being poor), US equities being expensive on ‘normalised’ earnings and the 4-week moving average of earnings revisions falling close to a 4-year low.

Two new concerns often cropped up: (i) the $0.5trn decline in global foreign exchange reserves, with this being likened to monetary tightening…[But] 80% of the decline is due to China, where the fall is largely being sterilised. (ii) The rising political tide against profits (living wage in the UK, the BEPS OECD initiative on corporate taxation).

What was not mentioned: Eurozone politics, US debt ceiling, Russia’s involvement in Syria or the UK referendum on the EU.

In sum, we think clients are focused more on risks, which are abnormally high, rather than reward, which is also high, with the equity risk premium, for example, at 5.8%. We would agree, however, that visibility is abnormally low.

Chinese investors, 16 Oct 2015.

Chinese investors appear to have regained their appetite for risk.

The Shanghai Composite Index gained 6.5% this week, helped by speculation that Beijing might do more to stimulate its economy.

Some bolder traders have been borrowing more money to buy shares, anticipating that markets are going to rally this autumn.

Xiao Shijun, an analyst at Guodu Securities, explains (via the WSJ):

“Some medium- to long-term investors are betting that the market has bottomed and thus are more confident to add leverage.”

And there are signs that the authorities have relaxed their recent clampdown on lending, which was imposed to calm excessive speculation.

China’s outstanding margin financing has risen 5.6% since the start of the month and looks to have bottomed, according to IG’s Angus Nicholson.

16 Oct 2015, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China --- Chinese investors look at prices of shares (red for price rising and green for price falling) at a stock brokerage house in Nantong city, east China’s Jiangsu province, 16 October 2015.

Ever wondered what you have to do to get banned from the City?

Well, running up losses of £1.4bn through rogue trading will do the trick.

The Financial Conduct Authority – Britain’s City watchdog – has declared today that former UBS trader Kweku Adoboli cannot work in the industry again after demonstrating “a clear and serious lack of honesty and integrity.”

It added:

“In reaching its decision, the FCA has considered all the relevant circumstances and the severity of the risk posed by Mr Adoboli to consumers and financial institutions, and to confidence in the market generally.”

Adoboli was released from prison this summer, having been sentenced to seven years in 2012 for Britain’s biggest ever fraud. He is now fighting efforts to deport him to Ghana, where he was born in 1980.

Updated

The Bank of England building on Threadneedle Street in the City of London.

Kristin Forbes’ speech today highlights that the Bank of England’s interest rate-setting committee is split into several camps, even though it voted 8-1 to leave borrowing costs unchanged last week.

IHS’s Howard Archer has broken them down:

The current position seems to be that Ian McCafferty is already voting for interest rate hike from 0.50% to 0.75%, while Kristin Forbes and (seemingly still) Martin Weale both believe interest rates need to rise before long.

In contrast, Andy Haldane and Gertjan Vlieghe are clearly far off from voting for a rate hike while Ben Broadbent has also recently indicated that he is some way off from such a move.

That leaves governor Mark Carney, and deputy governors Minouche Shafik and Jon Cunliffe in the centre ground.

Updated

Bank of England’s Forbes: Emerging market doom and gloom is “overblown”

Professor Kristin Forbes joined the Monetary Policy Committee of the Bank of England in July of 2014. http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/about/Pages/people/biographies/forbes.aspx

Professor Kristin Forbes.

Capping off a busy week for views out of the Bank of England’s rate-setting committee, Kristin Forbes is giving a speech in Brighton.

The key message for markets from Forbes is that the next move in rates is up and is not too far off.

That puts her at odds with the Bank’s chief economist Andy Haldane who has raised the prospect of the next move being down, even further below the current record low Bank rate of 0.5%.

Forbes says, however, that pessimism about the global economy is overdone.

Forbes, who is also professor of Management and Global Economics at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, told the Brighton and Hove Chamber of Commerce that:

“Although the risks and uncertainties in the global economy have increased, the widespread pessimism is overstated.”

“Despite the doom and gloom sentiment, the news on the international economy has not caused me to adjust my prior expectations that the next move in UK interest rates will be up and that it will occur sooner rather than later.”

“Of course, if some of the potential risks to emerging markets play out – such as a sharper slowdown than expected or financial crisis of some type – then the UK economy is unlikely to be immune. But based on what has actually occurred to date, the limited direct exposure of the UK to emerging markets (even when incorporating second-round effects through other countries such as Germany), appears manageable. This is especially true when considered relative to the strength of the UK’s domestic-led expansion – which shows all signs of continuing, even if at a more moderate pace than in the earlier stages of the recovery.”

At its last meeting, the Bank’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) left rates at a record low of 0.5%. But one of the nine rate-setters, Ian McCafferty, voted for a rate rise. Perhaps Forbes will be joining him soon….

Updated

El-Erian: Fed could hike in December

Investors who believe the Federal Reserve won’t raise rates this year could be making a mistake, argues Mohamed El-Erian, the chief economic adviser at Allianz.

El-Erian, former CEO of bond-trading giant Pimco, believes that that Janet Yellen and colleagues could take the plunge at their meeting in December, given the strength of the US jobs market.

He’s written his views up for Bloomberg. Here’s the conclusion:

After a frustratingly slow post-crisis start, the U.S. economy has had an impressive run of job creation. But further progress is dependent on important structural issues that are not easily addressed by Fed policy.

Meanwhile, wage and inflation pressures are starting to build, though in a rather modest fashion. And concerns about excessive risk-taking — an unintended side effect of the central bank’s prolonged use of unconventional monetary policy — are far from settled.

Taken together, this suggests that, even though an October rate hike can almost certainly be discounted, it would be premature to entirely rule out action by the Fed in December, let alone to predict it would be postponed until March of next year. Only a lot more signs of weakness in the domestic economy, as well as a return of global financial market instability, would make that a sure bet.

World markets hit two-month high on stimulus hopes

FTSE 100 slump<br />A city worker walks past a stock ticker screen at the London Stock Exchange in the City of London. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday August 25, 2015. The FTSE 100 Index bounced back above the 6,000 mark after surging by nearly 2% as it recovered following one of its worst sessions in recent years. See PA story CITY FTSE. Photo credit should read: Philip Toscano/PA Wire

World stock markets have hit their highest levels since August, driven by predictions that US interest rates are staying low for a while yet.

The main European indices have all gained nearly 1% this morning, following those gains in Asia overnight and a rally on Wall Street yesterday.

That has pushed the MSCI World Index up by 1.38% to levels not seen since August 21.

MSCI World Markets index

MSCI World Markets index Photograph: Thomson Reuters

Global markets have now gained 6% in October. So unless there’s a major reverse next week, the MSCI will post its best month since 2011.

That’s quite a bounceback from this summer’s turmoil, which saw around $11 trillion wiped off global stocks.

The prospect of more ultraloose monetary policy, plus a little more calm over China’s slowdown, are pushing shares up.

Jasper Lawler of CMC Markets says traders are anticipating more stimulus in Europe and China, rather than worrying about the Fed whipping away the punchbowl with an early rate hike:

Hopes of a delayed rate hike in the US and additional stimulus from Europe and China is helping global stock markets finish the week on a high. Shares across Asia have hit a two month high while the Shanghai Composite is setting up for its best weekly performance since early June.

Weak US inflation data, albeit above expectations, further bruised the case for a Federal Reserve rate rise. Markets are looking ahead to next week when the ECB meeting and China’s GDP report provide opportunities for the European Central Bank and the People’s Bank of China to increase stimulus.

Here’s the situation.

  • FTSE 100: up 0.8% or 49 points at 6,388
  • German DAX: up 0.86% or 86 points at 10,151
  • French CAC: up 0.8% or 38 points at 4,713
  • Japan’s Nikkei: Closed up 1.1% or 194 points at 18,291
  • China’s Shanghai Composite: Closed up 1.6% or 53 points at 3,391.

Uber is not illegal, rules High Court

Minicab-hailing app Uber has just won a victory in the high court.

A judge has ruled that its GPS technology does not break violate the Private Hire Vehicles (London) Act 1998 bans private hire cars from being equipped with taximeters.

My colleague David Hellier explains:

Had it lost the case, the company would have been forced to change its service to comply with rules that protect traditional black-cab drivers.

Here’s the full story:

Eurozone back in negative inflation

It’s official, the eurozone has slumped back in negative inflation again, intensifying pressure on the European Central Bank to act.

Eurostat has confirmed that prices across the euro area fell by 0.1% in September, down from an inflation rate of +0.1% in August.

Eurozone deflation

Eurozone deflation Photograph: Eurostat

The decline is mainly due to weak energy prices. Cheaper oil is driving down the costs of fuel — good news for consumers and business, but it does drag the eurozone inflation rate further from the 2% target.

Howard Archer of IHS Global Insight explains:

This marked the first deflation since March and was down from consumer price inflation of 0.1% in August and 0.3% in May.

A marked relapse in oil prices and very weak commodity prices first undermined and then reversed the upward trend in Eurozone consumer prices that had seen it move from deflation of 0.6% in January to inflation of 0.3% in May.

The ECB has already said it could boost its bond-buying stimulus programme if needed. And with prices falling in many eurozone countries, it could be prompted to act soon:

Britain’s John Lewis has reported underwhelming sales for the last week – with takings at its department store flat year-on-year.

But within the figures, there’s a trend of customers revising the horrors delights of the 1970s, with strong demand for knitted pouffes and platform shoes. Homeowners are even painting their rooms in brown and orange, risking terrifying flashbacks for those of a certain age.

Hugo Boss shop. Shopping. Glasgow, Scotland, UK 15th February 2005 COPYRIGHT PHOTO BY MURDO MACLEOD menswear clothes All Rights Reserved Tel + 44 131 669 9659 Mobile +44 7831 504 531 Email: m@murdophoto.com STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLY see for details: http://www.murdophoto.com/T%26Cs.html No syndication, no redistrubution, repro fees apply.

Hugo Boss shares are being bashed this morning, after it become the latest fashion chain to suffer from the Chinese slowdown.

They fell by 8.5% in early trading, after the German fashion firm cuts its profit and sales outlook. It blamed a slowdown in China, echoing Burberry on Thursday.

Hugo Boss also revealed that sales growth in the US has dropped too, due to weaker spending by tourists. That suggests the strengthening dollar is hurting, leaving overseas visitors with less to spend.

Nestlé hit by noodles recall

Nestle Chief Financial Officer Francois-Xavier Roger addresses a news conference at the company headquarters in Vevey, Switzerland, October 16, 2015. Nestle, the world’s largest packaged food company, lowered its full-year outlook on Friday, as a Maggi noodle recall in India knocked sales and undercalculated U.S. Skin Health rebates weighed on the Swiss company’s profits. Sales dropped 2.1 percent to 64.9 billion Swiss francs ($68 billion) in the nine months through September, missing analysts’ average forecast of 65.9 billion in a Reuters poll. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse

Food giant Nestlé is missing out on today’s rally, after missing sales forecasts and cutting its outlook.

Shares in Nestlé are down 2% today, with investors disappointed that revenue has fallen by 2.1% in the first nine months of the year.

The Swiss firm also cut its 2015 outlook to around 4.5%, below its long-term target of between 5% and 6%.

Nestlé suffered emerging market from weakness in China, and also a major food recall in India. In June, Indian regulators slammed its Maggi instant noodle products as “unsafe and hazardous”.

Updated

TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY JEAN-MICHEL HAUTEVILLE (FILES) A photo taken on March 7, 2012 shows partly built Volkswagen cars are seen traveling overhead at the assembly line for the VW Tiguan and Touran models in Wolfsburg, central Germany. German multinational automotive manufacturing group is headquartered in Wolfsburg. Three weeks after the Volkswagen pollution cheating scandal the companies supplying parts to VW and also the Association of German Metal Traders VDM are fearing consequences for their business. AFP PHOTO / ODD ANDERSENODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images

A Volkswagen assembly line in Wolfsburg, central Germany. Photograph: Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

The diesel emissions scandal appears to have cost Volkswagen some ground in the European auto sector.

New figures released this morning showed that car registrations rose for the 29th month running, as the industry continued to recover from the dark days of the eurozone debt crisis.

European car sales

European car sales Photograph: Thomson Reuters

Total sales jumped by 9.8% in September, but Volkswagen only sold 8.3% more cars compared to a year ago.

This cut VW’s market share to 23.3%, down from 23.7%.

That’s not a major decline – but remember that the emissions scandal only broke in mid-September, so this could be just the start….

Back in Shanghai, the Chinese stock market has hit a seven-week high as fears over its economy recede a little.

The Shanghai Composite jumped 1.4% today, suggesting traders aren’t too worried about Monday’s growth figures:

European stock markets are putting recent turbulence behind them.

The main indices are all up in early trading, with Britain’s bluechip FTSE 100 index jumping by 34 points of 0.5%. That means the Footsie has gained over 5% in October.

Here’s the situation:

European stock markets, October 16 2015

European stock markets, October 16 2015 Photograph: Thomson Reuters

European markets are now on track for their longest series of gains since April, points out Mike van Dulken of Accendo Markets.

He adds:

This remains driven by weak/mixed macro data from China, US and Europe delaying expectations for a Fed rate hike and high hopes of additional global stimulus which is considered positive for risk appetite.

Yesterday’s US inflation data is also helping to push money into shares.

Prices fell by 0.2% month-on-month in September, leaving the price of living unchanged year on year.

“Money managers are saying it looks increasingly like the Fed will not hike because the data around the world is coming in weak,” Mads Pedersen, head of global asset allocation at UBS Wealth Management, told the Wall Street Journal.

“Lukewarm data is good for equities again, just like it has been for most of this recovery.”

A flurry of weak corporate data in recent days has left most economists convinced that the Fed won’t raise interest rates at its monetary policy meeting later this month.

This week we’ve seen falling profits at Goldman Sachs, a profit warning from Walmart, and even falling demand for high end Winnebagos as US consumers cut back.

And earlier this month, the US employment figures were a big disappointment – with much fewer new jobs created than expected (just 142,000).

That doesn’t add up to the first rise in US interest rates since the financial crisis began.

David Levy, portfolio manager at Kenjol Capital Management, explains:

“Investors are reacting to the increasing likelihood that the Fed rate hike, which had been expected just a month ago in September, now likely won’t happen during the course of this year.”

There’s also talk in the markets that the Chinese government could announce fresh stimulus measures soon.

Pressure on Beijing could grow on Monday, when Chinese GDP figures are released. Economists predict that growth slowed to 6.8% in the last quarter, down from 7% in Q2.

Asian markets hit two-month highs

Asia-Pacific stock markets have hit their highest level in two months, as traders in Tokyo, Shanghai and Melbourne anticipate that the era of ultra-low global interest rates isn’t over yet.

Japan’s Nikkei jumped 1%, on hopes that the US Federal Reserve isn’t going to end the party this month. Other stock markets in the region are also showing gains:

Asian stock markets, October 16 2015

Asian stock markets right now. Photograph: Thomson Reuters

The Agenda: Markets to rally on US Fed hopes

(FILES) This May 4, 2008 file photo shows the US Federal Reserve Building in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve kept its benchmark federal funds interest rate unchanged at near zero percent as expected July 29, 2015, providing no fresh hints on when a long-awaited rate rise might come. The Federal Open Market Committee said the US economy has expanded “moderately” in recent months and the jobs market has strengthened, but noted continued “soft” business investment and exports. AFP PHOTO/Karen BLEIERKAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images

The US Federal Reserve Building in Washington, DC. Photograph: Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Good morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of the world economy, the financial markets, the eurozone and business.

Investors will be watching the US economy closely today, for signs that the world’s largest economy may be slowing. There are two pieces of economic data on the agenda:

  • US industrial production, at 2.15pm BST
  • The Michigan Consumer Confidence report, at 3pm BST

Economists reckon the figures might be weak, as Michael Hewson of CMC Markets explains:

Today’s US industrial and manufacturing production data for September are expected to reinforce the disappointing narrative with declines in both of -0.3% and -0.2% respectively, both of which would be negative for the second month in succession.

And negative economic data looks good for stocks right now….

…so shares in Europe are expected to rise, as traders bet that the US Federal Reserve could leave interest rates unchanged for the rest of the year.

As Hewson puts it, with the data so mixed….

…. is hard to see how policymakers can arrive at a consensus for what would be a momentous decision of being the first rise in US rates for 9 years. No-one will want to be remembered for getting a call of that magnitude wrong.

There’s also financial results from foodmaker Nestlé, French supermarket Carrefour, and UK retailer John Lewis (of which more shortly….).

Updated

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Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Growth fears as UK and eurozone service sectors slow – live updates” was written by Graeme Wearden (until 2pm BST) and Nick Fletcher (now), for theguardian.com on Monday 5th October 2015 14.21 UTC

Meanwhile here’s the arrivals at the Eurogroup meeting to discuss the latest Greek bailout programme:

And here’s an extract from the roundtable discussion:

Dennis de Jong, managing director at broker UFX.com said:

With inconclusive economic data in recent weeks, the Fed is now split on the timing of an interest rate rise. That situation is unlikely to change in response to today’s non-manufacturing figures, which aren’t strong enough to sway Janet Yellen and Co towards a clear decision.

A decline on last month puts a dampener on what is actually quite a robust set of numbers. It’s not all doom and gloom, however, as Yellen’s reluctance to act may be seen as a positive move elsewhere.

Wall Street, which has been quiet as it awaits consistency among the financial uncertainty, may now be prompted into increased activity before the end of 2016.

Confirmation that the US services sector saw slowing growth in September comes from the Institute for Supply Management.

The ISM services index fell to 56.9 from 59 in August, and lower than analysts’ expectations of a reading of 57.5p. Both new orders and business activity slowed.

But the employment component showed an increase:

Updated

And shortly we will get the ISM indices…

US service sector growth slows

America’s service sector is growing by less than expected, according to the first of two rival surveys.

Markit’s final purchasing managers index for the sector came in at 55.1 for September, down from an early reading of 55.6, which was also what analysts had been expecting for the final figure. That compares to 56.1 in August.

Markit service sector PMI
Market service sector PMI Photograph: Markit/Markit

Markit’s final composite reading is 55 compared to 55.7 in August. Chris Williamson, Chief Economist at Markit said:

The US economic growth slowed in the third quarter according the PMI surveys, down to around 2.2%. But this largely represents a payback after growth rebounded in the second quarter, suggesting that the economy is settling down to a moderate rate of growth in line with its long term average.

Hiring also remains relatively robust, albeit down from earlier in the year, again suggesting that the economy has shifted down a gear but remains in good health.

“At the moment it remains unclear as to whether growth will weaken further as wemove into the fourth quarter. However, with inflationary pressures waning, policymakers may have some breathing space to gauge the extent of any slowdown. Lower fuel costs helped push average prices charged for goods and services dropping at steepest rate for nearly five years.

Markit composite index
Markit composite index Photograph: Markit/Markit

Updated

Wall Street opens higher

In tandem with other global markets, Wall Street is moving ahead strongly.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up 164 points or 12%, while the S&P 500 has opened 0.5% higher.

Markets are being driven by hopes that central banks will not pull the plug on financial support in the immediate future. Friday’s poor US jobs numbers have convinced investors that the prospect of a Federal Reserve rate rise this year is looking less and less likely.

Another factor supporting the market is a rising oil price, which is boosting energy shares. Brent crude is up 2% after reports that Russia wants to meet other producers to discuss the market, where oversupply and falling demand have sent oil prices sharply lower. That could, believe some, presage production cuts. Meanwhile Friday also saw a fall in the number of rigs drilling for oil in the US.

China can manage its economic slowdown but needs to communicate policy more effectively, says the International Monetary Fund.

Ahead of its annual meeting the IMF said China’s exchange rate was in line with medium term fundamentals after the recent devaluations, Reuters reports.

Global corporations are avoiding tax to the tune of up to $240bn a year, according to a new report from the OECD, which has also announced reform measures to tackle the problem. Simon Bowers reports:

An unprecedented international collaboration on tax reform, led by the G20 nations and targeting many of the world’s largest global corporations, will wipe out much of the tax avoidance industry, it was claimed today.

The two-year reform programme, under the auspices of the OECD, was prompted by a spate of revelations in recent years about the tax affairs of multinationals including Starbucks, Google and Amazon.

Alongside the final batch of reforms, published today, the OECD released what it called “extremely conservative” estimates suggesting large global businesses were shifting profits and eroding the tax receipts of economies around the world at a cost of $100bn (£65bn) to $240bn a year — equivalent to between 4% and 10% of global corporation tax revenues.

In the face of increasingly aggressive tax avoidance, countries have been forced to rely more heavily on taxing income less able to be shifted abroad — such as workers’ pay and VAT.

“[The reforms will help] move away from an era when tax planning had become part of core business models,” said Pascal Saint-Amans, who has led the two-year OECD reform programme, backed by 60 countries representing more than 90% of the world’s economy. “Value creation [should be] the core business of industry. Tax planning should just be some supportive, marginal activity… The tax world will not be the same.”

Read more here:

Lunchtime summary: Growth fears after weak services data

A quick recap:

Britain’s recovery slowed last month, according to the latest survey of its dominant service sector.

Companies reported that activity grew at the slowest pace in two and a half years. Economists blame fears over China’s economy, and predict that GDP could grow by just 0.4% in the last three month of this year.

Expansion across the eurozone also eased back in September, data firm Markit reports. Firms in Germany, Spain and Ireland all said growth was slower, although France’s bucked the trend.

European stock markets are up. Shares are being driven by hopes that central banks will continue to stimulate the global economy, and resist early interest rate rises.

The FTSE 100 is now at its highest point of the day, up 132 points at 6262. The French CAC has soared by over 3%.

Two dozen Pacific-Rim countries are celebrating the creation of a major new trade partnership.

Workers have stormed the boardroom of Air France today, as the airline announced plans to cut 2,900 jobs. Two senior executives were forced to flee with ripped shirts.

TOPSHOTS Director of Air France in Orly Pierre Plissonnier, nearly shirtless, tries to cross a fence, helped by security and police officers, after several hundred of employees invaded the offices of Air France, interrupting the meeting of the Central Committee (CCE) in Roissy-en-France, on October 5, 2015. Air France-KLM unveiled a revamped restructuring plan on October 5 that could lead to 2,900 job losses after pilots for the struggling airline refused to accept a proposal to work longer hours. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
Air France director Pierre Plissonnier, nearly shirtless, tries to cross a fence after several hundred of employees invaded the firm’s offices today. Photograph: Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images

The Greek government is preparing its new budget. Alexis Tsipras’s government must explain how it will implement tough tax rises and spending cuts demanded by lenders.

Finance minister Euclid Tsakalotos is meeting fellow eurozone finance ministers in Brussels today. They’ll discuss the various prior actions Greece must deliver to receive its next aid tranche, and to open talks on debt relief.

And in the UK, chancellor George Osborne has confirmed that he’s selling off shares in Lloyds Banking Group to the public at a chunky discount.

Updated

European commissioner Pierre Moscovici tweets from Brussels:

The Trans-Pacific Partnership deal is “a huge strategic and political win for US President Barack Obama and Japan’s Shinzo Abe,” says the FT’s Shawn Donnan.

He writes:

It represents the economic backbone of the Obama administration’s strategic “pivot” to Asia and a response to the rise of the US’s chief rival, China, and its growing regional and global influence.

It is also a key component of the “third arrow” of economic reforms that Mr Abe has been pursuing in Japan since taking office in 2012.

Here’s the FT’s take (£): Negotiators strike Pacific trade deal

Historic TPP trade deal agreed

Over in Atlanta, a dozen Pacific Rim nations have reached the most sweeping trade liberalization pact in a generation.

After late hitches over drugs monopolies, and New Zealand’s dairy market, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) has been hammered out. It is meant to lower trader barriers in the region, and set common standards in around 40% of the world economy.

My colleague Martin Farrer explains:

The TPP aims to lower trade tariffs between the signatory nations and bring in wide-ranging new regulations for investment, agriculture, intellectual property, labour and the environment. This in turn could mean cheaper food, medicine and everyday household goods for millions of people. It will also help the 12 countries to counter China’s rising economic influence in the region.

More here:

Updated

The Brussels press pack are assembling for today’s meeting of finance ministers, where Greece’s new bailout package will be discussed.

But it’s not as exciting as the eurogroup meetings we enjoyed (or was it endured?) this summer, so there’s more space outside:

Updated

Greeks brace for austerity budget

Prime Minister of Greece Alexis Tsipras in parliament last night.
Prime Minister of Greece Alexis Tsipras in parliament last night. Photograph: George Panagakis/Pacific Pres/BI/.

The Greek parliament is back in full force today with prime minister Alexis Tsipras outlining his newly elected government’s policy programme as the draft 2015 budget is also submitted.

Our correspondent Helena Smith reports from Athens

After a week of diplomacy abroad, the Greek prime minister must now face the music of applying what will be the most onerous financial rescue programme to date. It will not be easy.

From months of often fraught negotiations just getting to the point of reaching agreement over the bailout deal, the debate has shifted from the abstract to the real with Greeks now being bombarded with news of what the latest accord will entail. The draft budget is expected to outline an array of hard hitting levies, including the much-hated property tax known as Enfia, as well as pension cuts and structural reforms – the price of being bailed out for a third time to the tune of €86bn.

The measures will throw the debt-stricken economy into recession with the budget forecasting a return to growth in 2017 (for many a conservative estimate).

The Greek finance minister, Euclid Tsakalotos, who is on his way to Luxembourg, will outline the savings and government priorities when he meets euro area counterparts attending tonight’s Euro Group.

One insider tells us:

“He will present the prior actions lenders are demanding at the meeting,”

“These are the first package of measures we have agreed to apply [in exchange] for loans.”

The measures, which are expected to include deep cuts to monthly pensions over €1,000, have to be implemented in the coming weeks – before more than 60 others are enforced in November for international creditors to begin a review of the Greek economy.

All of which is going to require nifty explanation when Tsipras (whose radical left Syriza party was first catapulted into office vowing to “cancel” such measures) takes to the podium to present the policies of his second term in office at 7:30pm this evening.

Unions and leftists are already girding for battle. “We are organising the response of popular workers to the new wave of attack,” the communist Pame announced this morning, calling on Greeks to participate in a mass rally on October 22 and a strike on November 12.

Updated

Air France-KLM has criticised those responsible for today’s violence, and insisted that most staff were protesting peacefully before a group burst into its boardroom.

A spokesman said:

“This violence was carried out by particularly violent, isolated individuals, whereas the protest by striking personnel was taking place calmly up until then.”

Air France assistant director long-haul flight, Pierre Plissonnier, left, is protected by security guards as he flees the Air France headquarters at Roissy Airport, north of Paris, France, after scuffles with union activists. Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. Union activists protesting proposed layoffs at Air France stormed the headquarters during a meeting about the job cuts, zeroing in on two managers who had their shirts torn from their bodies, scaled a fence and fled under police protection. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)
Air France assistant director long-haul flight, Pierre Plissonnier, left, is protected by security guards as he flees the Air France headquarters. Photograph: Jacques Brinon/AP

Associated Press has more details on the Air France protests this morning:

Union activists protesting proposed layoffs at Air France stormed the headquarters during a meeting, zeroing in on two managers who had their shirts torn from their bodies, scaled a fence and fled under police protection.

An Associated Press photographer saw about a hundred activists rush the building. The managers who fled included the head of human resources.

Alexandre de Juniac, the CEO of Air France-KLM, announced Friday the company would have to cut jobs after failing to reach an agreement with pilots. French media reported a proposal to slash 2,900 jobs.

De Juniac said the company was being squeezed by low-cost airlines in Europe and Gulf carriers for long-haul flights. Monday’s meeting was intended to detail the cuts, which he told Europe 1 radio would be “significant.”

Employees of Air France shout slogans inside the company headquarters in Roissy-en-France, on October 5, 2015, interrupting the launch of the plan at a central committee meeting.
Employees of Air France shout slogans inside the company headquarters in Roissy-en-France, on October 5, 2015, interrupting the launch of the plan at a central committee meeting. Photograph: Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images

Fortunately, Xavier Broseta and Pierre Plissonnier did manage to escape the demonstrators, sans chemises.

Air France director of Human Ressources, Xavier Broseta, right, and Air France assistant director long-haul flight, Pierre Plissonnier, center, are protected by a police officer as they flee Air France headquarters at Roissy Airport, north of Paris, after scuffles with union activist, Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. Union activists protesting proposed layoffs at Air France stormed the headquarters during a meeting about the job cuts, zeroing in on two managers who had their shirts torn from their bodies, scaled a fence and fled under police protection. (AP Photo/Jacques Brinon)

Air France execs lose their shirts as workers storm HQ

Over in Paris, two Air France executives appear to have had their shirts ripped from their backs after the airline announced plans to cut up to 2,900 jobs.

According to local media reports, several hundred workers stormed the airline’s headquarters this morning, after it announced the cutbacks.

Photos from the scene show Pierre Plissonnier, Air France’s assistant director for long-haul flights, leaving the scene in a disheveled state.

Director of Air France in Orly Pierre Plissonnier, nearly shirtless, runs away from the demonstrators, helped by security officers, after several hundred of employees invaded the offices of Air France, interrupting the meeting of the Central Committee (CCE) in Roissy-en-France, on October 5, 2015. Air France-KLM unveiled a revamped restructuring plan on October 5 that could lead to 2,900 job losses after pilots for the struggling airline refused to accept a proposal to work longer hours. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
Pierre Plissonnier, the director of Air France in Orly, running away from the demonstrators, helped by security officers, after several hundred of employees invaded the offices of Air France. Photograph: Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images
Director of Air France in Orly Pierre Plissonnier, nearly shirtless, walks away from the crowd, helped by security and police officers, after several hundred of employees invaded the offices of Air France, interrupting the meeting of the Central Committee (CCE) in Roissy-en-France, on October 5, 2015. Air France-KLM unveiled a revamped restructuring plan on October 5 that could lead to 2,900 job losses after pilots for the struggling airline refused to accept a proposal to work longer hours. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
Plissonnier walking away from the crowd. Photograph: Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images

Human resources boss Xavier Broseta is pictured trying to climb a fence to flee.

Xavier Broseta, Executive Vice President for Human Resources and Labour Relations at Air France, is evacuated by security after employees interrupted a meeting at the Air France headquarters building in Roissy<br />A shirtless Xavier Broseta (C), Executive Vice President for Human Resources and Labour Relations at Air France, is evacuated by security after employees interrupted a meeting with representatives staff at the Air France headquarters building at the Charles de Gaulle International Airport in Roissy, near Paris, France, October 5, 2015.” width=”1000″ height=”662″ class=”gu-image” /><br />
<figcaption> <span class=Xavier Broseta, Executive Vice President for Human Resources and Labour Relations at Air France, is evacuated by security. Photograph: Jacky Naegelen/Reuters
Human Resources Assistant Manager of Air France Xavier Broseta, shirtless, tries to cross a fence, helped by security and police officers, after several hundred of employees invaded the offices of Air France, interrupting the meeting of the Central Committee (CCE) in Roissy-en-France, on October 5, 2015. Air France-KLM unveiled a revamped restructuring plan on October 5 that could lead to 2,900 job losses after pilots for the struggling airline refused to accept a proposal to work longer hours. AFP PHOTO / KENZO TRIBOUILLARDKENZO TRIBOUILLARD/AFP/Getty Images
Broseta then tried to cross a fence, helped by security and police officers. Photograph: Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images

It’s not clear exactly what happened. But the AFP newswire reports that CEO Frederic Gagey “made a hasty exit, according to two members of the committee”, after workers broke into the meeting.

Unions have also called a strike to protest at the job cuts, which were announced after pilots turned down a proposal to work 100 more hours per year for the same salary.

It could see 300 pilots, 700 air hostesses and stewards, and 1,900 ground staff laid off by 2017.

Le Figaro reports that Air France is planning to file a complaint of “aggravated violence”. More here.

Updated

European stock markets aren’t panicking at today’s service sector slowdown.

Instead, they continue to rally –– catching up with Wall Street’s late jump on Friday night.

France’s CAC index is the best performer, following the news that its services firms actually caught up (a little) with the rest of the eurozone last month.
But other markets are also gaining ground, with the FTSE 100 jumping over around 2%, despite warnings that the economy may be slowing down.

European stock markets, 11am October 05 2015
European stock markets, 11am today. Photograph: Thomson Reuters

So what’s going on?

Well, investors do seem confident that the US Federal Reserve won’t raise rates this month, and probably not before 2016.

That’s bullish for shares, and also weakens the US dollar — which has a positive effect on commodity prices and oil. And that’s why mining shares are up today, while Royal Dutch Shell has gained 4%.

Jasper Lawler of CMC says:

UK and European markets were higher across the board on Monday, playing catch-up from the biggest turnaround on the Dow Jones Industrial Average in four years on Friday.

The French CAC was higher by over 2.5% supported by positive French service sector data. Missed expectations for Germany’s service sector took the edge off gains on the DAX, which was still higher by over 1.5%.

A new survey of Britain’s top finance chiefs confirms that the UK economy may be weakening.

Our Katie Allen reports this morning:

China’s downturn, the prospect of rising interest rates and uncertainty about the global economic outlook have knocked confidence among bosses of the UK’s biggest companies, according to a survey.

Chief financial officers (CFOs) polled by the consultancy Deloitte reported a sharp rise in uncertainty facing their businesses and have scaled back their expectations for investment and hiring over the coming year.

Almost three-quarters of the 122 CFOs, or 73%, said the level of financial and economic uncertainty was either above normal, high or very high. That was up from 55% in the second quarter of this year and is the highest proportion for more than two years.

More here:

Deloitte survey of CFOs
Uncertainty is rising…. Photograph: Deloitte/Guardian

Economist Howard Archer, of IHS Global Insight, fears UK economic growth could stumble in the last quarter of 2015:

UK "recovery at risk" from Chinese chill

The slowdown across Britain’s service sector is putting the recovery at risk, says David Noble CEO at the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply.

He blames the knock-on effect of China, which sparked global market panic in August after Beijing devalued the yuan.

Noble says:

The further softening of growth in the services sector must now be causing some concern for the sustainability of the recent recovery in the UK economy….

It appears that when China sneezes, the world catches a cold as some companies cited the region as a cause for worldwide concern.

Some instant reaction to the slowdown in Britain’s services sector:

UK service sector growth hits 2.5 year low

Britain’s service sector suffered a sharp slowdown last month, new data shows, raising fears that the economy may be faltering.

Data firm Markit reports that activity across the sector grew at its slowest rate since April 2013 in September. Its service PMI fell to 53.3, from August’s 55.6 (where 50=stagnation).

Firms reported that new business slowed, with some clients unwilling to place new contracts in the current “global economic uncertainty”.

More encouragingly, firms did keep hiring staff, but business investment is also under pressure.

And with Germany, Ireland and Spain’s service sectors also slowing (see last post), signs are building that the European economy may be faltering.

UK service PMI, September 2015
The blue line = today’s PMI survey Photograph: Markit

Markit’s Chris Williamson fears that “the economy sank further into a soft patch at the end of the third quarter”, and is only growing at 0.3% per quarter.

Services makes up around three-quarter of the UK economy, so any slowdown has serious consequences.

Williamson says:

“Weakness is spreading from the struggling manufacturing sector, hitting transport and other industrial-related services in particular.

There are also signs that consumers have become more cautious and are pulling back on their leisure spending, such as on restaurants and hotels.”

Updated

Eurozone service slows, putting more pressure on ECB

Growth across Europe’s private sector is slowing, according to the latest healthcheck of the region’s service sector.

Markit’s Eurozone PMI, which measures activity at thousands of companies, dipped to a four-month low of 53.6 in September, down from 54.3 in August. That shows the sector kept growing, but at a slower rate.

Growth in the service sector hit a seven-month low, with the Services PMI dropping to 53.7 from 54.0.

Growth in Spain hit its lowest level since January, although France – usually a laggard in these surveys – clawed back some ground:

Here’s the detail:

Eurozone PMIs, September 2015
Eurozone PMIs, September 2015 Photograph: Markit

Chris Williamson, chief economist at Markit, reckons that the slowdown could raise the chances of fresh stimulus measures from the European Central Bank:

“The final PMI reading came in slightly below the earlier flash estimate but still leaves a signal of the eurozone economy having expanded 0.4% in the third quarter.

“However, the failure of the economy to pick up speed over the summer will be a disappointment to the ECB, especially with job creation sliding to an eight-month low.

“The weakening of the pace of expansion in September raises the risk of growth fading further in the fourth quarter, which would in turn boost the likelihood of the ECB opening the QE taps further.

Mining stocks are packing the top of the FTSE 100 leaderboard:

Top risers on the FTSE 100
Top risers on the FTSE 100 this morning. Photograph: Thomson Reuters

That shows optimism that central banks will do more to stimulate the global economy, now that the US labor market appears to be weakening.

Tony Cross of Trustnet Direct explains:

Consensus is building that the Federal Reserve won’t now be in a position to hike interest rates before the end of the year. This gives emerging markets a little more breathing room and it’s the mining stocks that are forging their way to the top of the table.

Updated

European markets jump on stimulus hopes

Shares are rallying across Europe this morning, fuelled by hopes that central banks keep topping up the punchbowl for longer.

France’s CAC index is the biggest riser, up nearly 2%, and Germany’s DAX gaining 1.3%.

The FTSE 100 is close behind, up almost 100 points, as traders shake off their disappointment over Saturday night’s rugby.

European stock markets, October 05 2015

Investors have had a weekend to ponder Friday’s disappointing US jobs report, and concluded that a weak labor market means the Federal Reserve will resist raising interest rates in 2015.

And that’s encouraging them back into the market.

Kim Young-jun, a stock analyst at SK Securities in Seoul, explains (via Reuters)

“Risk aversion weakened today as the weak U.S. employment data supported expectations that the Fed would put off the timing of rate hikes.”

Glencore’s shares have rallied by 8% in early trading in London, fuelled by that takeover talk and speculation that it could sell its agricultural business.

They’re up 7.8p at 108.6p, having briefly jumped 20% to 114.45p. That’s quite a recovery, given they slumped to 66p last week.

However, it’s a weaker rally than in Asia, though, where they spiked 70% at one stage today.

Glencore has just issued a statement to the City, saying it is:

…the Board confirms that it is not aware of any reasons for these price and volume movements or of any information which must be announced to avoid a false market in the Company’s securities or of any inside information that needs to be disclosed…

That could dampen some of the chatter that a big deal is close…..

Updated

Treasury to sell £2bn Lloyds stake to public

Lloyds Bank shares to go on sale to the British public<br />epa04963989 (FILE) A file photograph showing a sign outside a Lloyds bank branch in London, Britain, 23 October 2014. According to news reports, on 05 October 2015 the British Chancellor of the Exchquer, Geroge Osbourne, has announce that 2 billion GBP or 2.7 billion euro worth of Lloyds Bank shares to go on sale to the British public. EPA/WILL OLIVER” width=”1000″ height=”631″ class=”gu-image” /> </figure>
<p><strong>Seven long years after bailing out Lloyds Banking Group, the UK government is finally selling some of its remaining stake to the public.</strong></p>
<p><a href=The Treasury has announced plans to sell £2bn of Lloyds shares in a retail offering. Anyone taking part will get a 5% discount, plus a bonus shares for every 10 they hold for at least a year.

The value of the bonus share incentive will be capped at £200 per investor. People applying for investments of less than £1,000 will be prioritised.

The move brings a bit of Thatcherite glamour (?!) to the Conservative Party conference, where delegates fondly remember the “Tell Sid” privatisation fetish drive of the 1980s.

But as the Economist’s Stan Pignal points out, discounted share sales benefit some rather more than others….

Updated

Reports that Glencore is in talks to sell its entire agriculture business are helping to drive its shares higher.

That would provide fresh resources to tackle its $30bn debt mountain, and to handle a further drop in commodity prices.

Glencore shares surge on sale talk

Something is going on at Glencore, the troubled commodity trading and mining company.

Shares in Glencore leapt by over 70% in Hong Kong overnight, and are currently up over 30%.

This comes after the Daily Telegraph reported that Ivan Glencore is prepared to listen to takeover offers for the company he has created, following the recent slump in its value.

Their commodity editor Andrew Critchlow wrote:

Glencore would listen to offers for a takeover of the entire company but its management does not believe there are any buyers willing to pay a fair value for the business in the current market.

That report appears to have sparked a wave of buying into Glencore, whose shares have lost around three-quarters of their value in the last year.

Glencore itself, though, says it’s “unaware” of the reason behind the surge, according to Bloomberg’s Jonathan Ferro.

American Apparel files for bankrupcy

Big news breaking in the retail sector — American Apparel, supplier of ethical clothing and god-awful adverts, has filed for bankruptcy protection.

The move follows a steady slide in sales, and ever-more disturbing antics by ex-chairman Dov Charney, who was forced out a year ago.

The Agenda: US jobs report lingers

Good morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of the world economy, the financial market, the eurozone and business.

A new week begins with investors digesting still last Friday’s disappointing US jobs data.

September’s Non-Farm Payroll was a bit of a shocker, with just 142,000 new jobs created, and wages unchanged month-on-month. That suggests America’s economy is being hit by the slowdown in emerging markets such as China, raising fears that a new downturn is looming.

And that has actually pushed shares higher in Asia this morning on speculation that monetary policy is going to stay loose for even longer.

Japan’s Nikkei gained 1.6%, while the Indian market is up around 1.5%:

We’ll get a fresh insight into the health of the global economy today, when new surveys of the world service sector are released.

Those Purchasing Managers Surveys will show if growth speeded up or slowed down; we get the eurozone report at 9am BST and the UK at 9.30am BST.

And over in Greece, Alexis Tsipras’s new government will be presenting its new budget, ahead of a vote on Wednesday.

We’ll be tracking all the main events through the day….

Updated

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U.K. Manufacturing Sector growth slows in September, prompting manufacturers to lay off workers, against backdrop of uncertain global outlook. Eurozone manufacturing also lost momentum and output from Chinese factories continued to fall…

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “UK manufacturing sector suffers job losses for first time in two years” was written by Julia Kollewe and Katie Allen, for theguardian.com on Thursday 1st October 2015 18.52 UTC

Tough export markets and weaker consumer spending continued to take their toll on UK factories last month, prompting the first job losses for the sector in more than two years, according to a survey that echoed signs of manufacturing weakness around the world.

The performance at UK factories was lacklustre in September, when growth slipped to a three-month low. Against the backdrop of warnings about the uncertain outlook for global growth, eurozone manufacturing also lost momentum and output from Chinese factories continued to fall.

For the UK, the first snapshot of manufacturing performance in September continued a downbeat trend. The key measure of factory activity slipped back to within a whisker of June’s two-month low, according to the Markit/CIPS manufacturing PMI report.

At 51.5 the main balance was still above the 50-mark that separates growth from contraction, but it marked a slowdown from 51.6 in August and economists said it would further convince policymakers at the Bank of England to hold off from raising interest rates from their current record low of 0.5%.

The survey reported manufacturing job losses for the first time since April 2013.

“Job cuts send a signal that manufacturers are becoming more cautious about the future, which may lead to a further scaling back of production at some firms in coming months,” said Rob Dobson, senior economist at Markit.

“The ongoing malaise of the manufacturing sector will add to broader growth worries and supports dovish calls for a first rise in interest rates to be held off until the industry returns to a firmer footing.”

The manufacturing sector has been growing for 30 months, according to the survey, but the pace has slowed since the start of the summer. While output growth improved slightly last month, growth in new orders tailed off to the weakest rate seen this year.

Manufacturing growth
Manufacturing growth in the UK. Illustration: Markit/CIPS

Manufacturing growth across the eurozone slowed to a five-month low, according to separate reports from Markit. Its factory PMI for the currency bloc slipped to 52.0 from 52.3 in August. Activity slowed in Germany and Spain, while the French factory sector is expanding again.

The slump at China’s factories also continued, but there were some signs of stabilisation. The Caixin China general manufacturing PMI found that production was still falling, forcing firms to lay off more people. The official manufacturing PMI published by the Beijing government also showed that manufacturing was still contracting, but at a slower rate.

Economists drew links between China’s downturn and the pressures on UK manufacturers already grappling with a relatively strong pound, which makes their goods more expensive to overseas buyers.

“Manufacturing continues to face headwinds from weaker demand from China and emerging markets – where the UK sends up to 15% of its exports – in addition to strength in sterling which is up 15% in effective terms compared to its February 2013 low,” said Kallum Pickering, senior UK economist at Berenberg bank.

He saw little prospect of manufacturing having boosted the wider economy in recent months but was optimistic EU and US demand would help the sector.

“For now, UK manufacturers might see export demand dwindling as the developing world struggles with slowing Chinese demand and weak commodity prices, but in the medium term rising demand from the UK’s biggest and closest trading partners should help underpin a recovery in UK manufacturing,” Pickering added.

Separate UK figures on productivity also pointed to recent weakness in the manufacturing sector. There was a 0.5% fall in factory output per hour in the second quarter, bucking the improving trend for the wider economy, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

Across all sectors, productivity grew by 0.9% from the first to the second quarter on an output per hour measure. That took productivity to the highest level on record, but it was still 15% below where it would have been had pre-downturn trends continued, the ONS said.

Zach Witton, a deputy chief economist at EEF, the manufacturers’ organisation, said: “Today’s data suggests the challenging export environment and weak demand for investment goods in the oil and gas sector has started to take a toll on business confidence.”

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Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Greece debt crisis: ECB tightens screw ahead of emergency eurozone summit – as it happened” was written by Graeme Wearden (now), Nick Fletcher, Paul Farrell and Helen Davidson (all earlier), for theguardian.com on Monday 6th July 2015 20.50 UTC

And here’s Tuesday’s Guardian — complete with Yanis Varoufakis leaving the building…

Just one more thing… the front pages of the UK newspapers. And tomorrow’s crunch summit makes the front of the Financial Times:

While Angela Merkel’s hard-ish line on Greece is the splash in the Daily Telegraph:

I wonder what’s on the front page of Tuesday’s Guardian. Stay tuned….

Updated

Closing summary: Last chance for Greek deal looms

We’re been live-blogging the reaction to Sunday’s Greek referendum for around 21 hours now. It’s time to wrap up and give the Guardian web servers a rest.

So, a final recap.

Greece and the eurozone will make one last, desperate attempt to make progress towards an urgently needed bailout deal on Tuesday.

Leaders, and finance ministers, will both hold crucial meetings in Brussels, after Sunday’s referendum result raised the risks of Grexit to new heights. It’s a final chance for Greece to propose a new reform plan that could start the ball rolling towards a new aid package, but the journey looks perilous.

The leaders of France and Germany are scrambling to reach a consensus tonight in Paris, at a top-level meeting about Greece (photos here).

Greece’s prime minister has held telephone calls with the heads of the International Monetary Fund and also the European Central Bank. Alexis Tsipras told Mario Draghi that the capital controls in Greece need to be lifted, but was told by Christine Lagarde that the IMF cannot released more funds now Athens is in arrears.

Earlier, Francois Hollande insisted that there was time to reach a deal. Angela Merkel sounded less optimistic, though, warning that there was currently no basis for an agreement. Press conference highlights start here.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel makes a statement with French President Francois Hollande during a press conference after their meeting at the Elysee Palace on July 06, 2015 in Paris, France. Angela Merkel met Francois Hollande to discuss Greece’s situation in the European Union in a post-referendum environment.

Spain’s PM warned that time was now very short, while Dutch leader Mark Rutte said Greece must accept deep reforms to keep its place in the eurozone.

Analysts aren’t convinced that progress will be made tomorrow….

The European Central Bank has tightened the rules for giving emergency funding to Greek banks tonight. It is now imposing tougher haircuts on the assets they hand over, restricting their ability to access the funding.

The ECB also reportedly rejected a request for €3bn in extra ELA support:

This means Greek banks will remain shut for at least two more days, after capital controls were extended until the end of Wednesday.

Over in Greece, Alexis Tsipras has mobilised the leaders of the main opposition parties to support him. They signed a joint statement, saying Sunday’s referendum showed Greece’s desire for a “socially just and economically sustainable agreement”.

There’s talk of a new mood of national unity, but it could be swiftly shattered.

Tsipras has also passed the honour/poisoned chalice of being Greece’s finance minister to Euclid Tsakalotos, following Yanis Varoufakis’s resignation this morning.

Tsakalotos was sworn in tonight, and will represent Greece at Tuesday’s eurogroup meeting. He’s unlikely to don a tie for the occasion, though. Here’s our profile of Euclid.

Varoufakis has denied tonight that he was a sacrifical lamb, having exited the finance ministry in classic style today:

Outgoing Greek Finance minister Yanis Varoufakis leaves onto his motorcycle with his wife Danai after his resignation at the ministry of Finance in downtown Athens on July 6 2015. Varoufakis resigned in what appeared to be a concession by Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras to international creditors after his resounding victory in a historic bailout referendum. AFP PHOTO / LOUISA GOULIAMAKILOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images

In the UK, George Osborne has warned that the risks to the UK are rising. Britain is already providing more consular support in Greece for expats and holidaymakers, and help for businesses struggling to trade with Greek firms.


Video: George Osborne in parliament

And Fitch has warned that the risks of Greece leaving the eurozone are much higher, after last night’s resounding No.

I’ll pop back into the blog if there are any major developments — otherwise, please tune in tomorrow morning for more. Thanks, and goodnight. GW

Updated

Alexis Tsipras has discussed the Greek banking sector’s liquidity issues with ECB president Mario Draghi tonight.

Tsipras also raised the “immediate need” to lift capital controls during the phone call, according to a government spokesman quoted on Reuters.

Our europe editor, Ian Traynor, sums up the situation tonight:

Germany and France scrambled to avoid a major split over Greece on Monday evening as the eurozone delivered a damning verdict on Alexis Tsipras’s landslide referendum victory on Sunday and Angela Merkel demanded that the Greek prime minister put down new proposals to break the deadlock.

As concerns mount that Greek banks will run out of cash and about the damage being inflicted on the country’s economy, hopes for a breakthrough faded. EU leaders voiced despair and descended into recrimination over how to respond to Sunday’s overwhelming rejection of eurozone austerity terms as the price for keeping Greece in the currency.

Tsipras, meanwhile, moved to insure himself against purported eurozone plots to topple him and force regime change by engineering a national consensus of the country’s five mainstream parties behind his negotiating strategy, focused on securing debt relief.

Tsipras also sacrificed his controversial finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, in what was seen as a conciliatory signal towards Greece’s creditors.

In Paris, Chancellor Angela Merkel and President François Hollande tried to plot a common strategy after Greeks returned a resounding no to five years of eurozone-scripted austerity. The two leaders were trying to find a joint approach to the growing crisis ahead of an emergency eurozone summit on Tuesday to deal with the fallout.

But Merkel said there was no current basis for negotiating with the Greek side and called on Tsipras to make the next move.

As eurozone leaders prepared for today’s emergency summit in Brussels , the heads of government were at odds. France, Italy and Spain are impatient for a deal while Germany, the European commission and northern Europe seem content to let Greece stew andallow the euphoria following Sunday’s vote give way to the sobering realities of bank closures, cash shortages and isolation…..

Here’s the full story.

The logo of the International Monetary Fund.

Christine Lagarde spoke to Alexis Tsipras today, and explained that the International Monetary Fund can no longer provide money to Greece after it failed to repay €1.6bn last week.

Under IMF rules, once a country is in arrears, fresh funds cannot be supplied, a spokesman explained (via Reuters)

Hat-tip to Sky News’s Ed Conway for getting into Yanis Varoufakis’s leaving bash tonight and grabbing a quick interview.

Greece’s finance minister denied that he’d sacrificed himself, declaring:

“No, no, this is politics, mate. There are no sacrificial lambs.

Varoufakis added that he’ll rest on Tuesday, but is bound to offer advice from the sidelines.

Tuesday’s edition of the Guardian will carry many letters from readers about the Greek crisis, expressing support for Greece at this time.

Guardian Letters: Athens has reinvented our vision of democracy

Italy’s finance minister has suggested that the eurozone is willing to consider a new aid programme for Greece:

Pier Carlo Padoan told Canale 5 television.

“The 18 (other countries in the euro) are open to re-considering a Greek request which can only be a request for a new programme, not a continuation of the old one,”

Spain’s prime minister Mariano Rajoy has echoed Angela Merkel and Francois Hollande tonight, by warning that time is very short:

Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte has warned Greece it must decide whether it wants to remain in the eurozone, and accept the ‘deep reforms’ needed.

He told MPs tonight that Athens must deliver acceptable proposals to its creditors.

If things stay the way they are, then we’re at an impasse. There is no other choice, they must be ready to accept deep reforms.”

A Greek insider has told Reuters that the European Central Bank hiked the haircut on Greek assets by around 10%, but the impact will be ‘minimal’.

So the ECB hasn’t pulled the plug, yet…..

Updated

Greece Facing Uncertain Future After Rejecting EU Proposals<br />ATHENS, GREECE – JULY 6: People line up at an ATM machine outside a bank on July 6, 2015 in Athens Greece. Politicians in Europe and Greece are planning emergency talks after Greek voters rejected EU proposals to pay back it’s creditors creating an uncertain future for Greece. Finance minister Yanis Varoufakis resigned hours after the vote saying that it was felt his departure would be helpful in finding a solution.. ( Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)” width=”1000″ height=”600″ class=”gu-image” /><br />
<figcaption> <span class=People line up at an ATM machine outside a bank in Athens today. Photograph: Milos Bicanski/Getty Images

AFP has a good summary of the situation in Greece’s banking sector:

Greek banks to stay closed Tuesday and Wednesday

Greek banks will remain closed on Tuesday and Wednesday with limits on daily withdrawals unchanged, officials said on Monday as the European Central Bank maintained its liquidity assistance to the nation’s beleaguered lenders.

“Until Wednesday evening we continue as things stand today,” said Louka Katseli, chairwoman of the National Bank of Greece.

Speaking on behalf of the association of Greek banks, she added:

“If there is a decision by the European Central Bank in the meantime enabling us to modify this decision, there will be a new decision.”

The European Central Bank’s governing council decided to maintain the emergency liquidity assistance keeping Greek banks afloat at the level set on June 26, the Frankfurt-based bank said in a statement.

But the ECB said it had also “adjusted” the collateral demanded from Greek banks in return for the assistance.

“The financial situation of the Hellenic Republic has an impact on Greek banks since the collateral they use in ELA relies to a significant extent on government-linked assets…

“In this context, the governing council decided today to adjust the haircuts on collateral accepted by the Bank of Greece for ELA,” the ECB added, without specifying the level.

Capital controls were enacted on June 28, limiting ATM withdrawals by Greeks to €60 per account daily after a referendum on bailout terms sparked a run on deposits.

The Bank of Greece had requested an increase in emergency liquidity assistance (ELA) and that request was the subject of the ECB meeting, held a day after 61% of Greeks voted against further austerity measures in Sunday’s plebiscite.

ELA is currently the only source of financing for Greek banks, and therefore the Greek economy. But with Greece’s bailout programme now officially expired and in the absence of any new programme, the conditions for its continuation are no longer met.

But analysts believe the ECB will not want to be the one to pull the plug on Greece and force the country out of the single currency.

Updated

The Euro symbol in Willy Brandt Square, Frankfurt, on the first day of its restoration. The euro symbol will go through a four days restoration, starting on the day after Greece have voted ‘No’ to the EU, the ECB and the IMF policies, generating uncertainties on the monetary sign future. --- Image by © Horacio Villalobos/Corbis
The Euro symbol in Willy Brandt Square, Frankfurt, on the first day of its four-day restoration. Photograph: Horacio Villalobos/Corbis
Euro symbol in Willy Brandt Square, on the first day of its restoration.<br />06 Jul 2015, Frankfurt, Germany — Workers toil on the euro symbol in Willy Brandt Square, Frankfurt, Germany, 06 July 2015, during the first day of its restoration. The euro symbol will go through a four days restoration, starting on the day after Greece have voted ‘No’ to the EU, the ECB and the IMF policies, generating uncertainties on the monetary sign future. — Image by © Horacio Villalobos/Corbis” width=”1000″ height=”667″ class=”gu-image” /> </figure>
</p></div>
<p class=Updated

Two members of the ECB’s governing council pushed for Greece’s banking sector to be hit with even tougher measures, according to Claire Jones of the Financial Times.

She writes:

The ECB refused to disclose the size of the new haircuts, but all four of Greece’s main banks are thought still to have enough collateral available to roll over their emergency loans.

Two people on the governing council objected to the decision, according to Eurosystem sources. Both of the objectors wanted the ECB to take stronger measures.

That implies either an even higher haircut (putting Greek banks in greater peril), lowering the ELA cap (ditto), or terminating ELA off (which would be game over for Greek banks).

The ECB may not have pulled the trigger on Greek banks tonight, but it is reserving the right to take a shot if Tuesday’s emergency summit doesn’t deliver any progress.

Updated

Confused? Try this….

This graph is crucial to understanding what the ECB did tonight.

By raising the haircut applied on assets from Greek banks, it cuts the amount of emergency liquidity that can be handed back in return. Every time the haircut goes up, the ‘value’ of the assets that can be used to access ELA falls.

So, to simplify the issue, each €1bn of Greek assets might have yielded €520m of emergency cash yesterday, but tomorrow it might only be good for €480m, for example (figures plucked out of the air).

Raise the haircut high enough, and Greek banks simply can’t qualify for extra assistance at all.

Updated

The European Central Bank has just raised the risk of a Greek bank going under, argues George Hay, European Financial Editor at Reuters Breakingviews.

ECB hits Greek banks with tougher haircuts

Finally, the European Central Bank has announced its decision on the emergency support it provides to Greek banks.

And the ECB has maintained the cap on emergency liquidity assistance (ELA) at €89bn, but crucially it has “adjusted” the haircuts it applies to the assets which Greek banks hand over in return for funds.

In simple terms, that probably means the ECB is treating Greek government bonds as riskier, and valuing them as such when it calculates how much liquidity it can provide.

It’s another tightening of the screw on Greece – meaning some banks may find it even tougher to qualify for emergency liquidity assistance.

Here’s the full statement:

ELA to Greek banks maintained

The Governing Council of the European Central Bank decided today to maintain the provision of emergency liquidity assistance (ELA) to Greek banks at the level decided on 26 June 2015 after discussing a proposal from the Bank of Greece.

ELA can only be provided against sufficient collateral.

The financial situation of the Hellenic Republic has an impact on Greek banks since the collateral they use in ELA relies to a significant extent on government-linked assets.

In this context, the Governing Council decided today to adjust the haircuts on collateral accepted by the Bank of Greece for ELA.

The Governing Council is closely monitoring the situation in financial markets and the potential implications for the monetary policy stance and for the balance of risks to price stability in the euro area. The Governing Council is determined to use all the instruments available within its mandate.

More reaction to follow…

Updated

Crisis meeting in Paris between French President and German Chancellor<br />epa04834368 French President Francois Hollande and German Chancellor Angela Merkel deliver a speech to the press following a crisis meeting at the Elysee Palace regarding Greece, in Paris, France, 06 July 2015. Speaking after a bilateral meeting in Paris, Hollande drew attention to the fact that ‘time is running out,’ while Merkel said it was up to Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras to come up with proposals on the way forward at the eurozone summit. EPA/ETIENNE LAURENT” width=”1000″ height=”667″ class=”gu-image” /><br />
<figcaption> <span class=Merkel and Hollande tonight. Photograph: Etienne Laurent/EPA

Merkel returns to her favourite theme – that European solidarity and responsibility are linked.

Europe can only hold itself together if each country takes responsibility for itself, she says, insisting that Greece got a generous offer in the past.

Merkel: No basis for negotiations yet

Angela Merkel agrees that the door to talks with Greece is still open, despite yesterday’s No vote.

But Greece must put its proposals on the table this week. As things stand, there is no basis for talks on a new programme under the European Stability Mechanism (ie, a new aid programme)

Hollande also speaks of the values that hold Europe together. It is not just a monetary and finance construction.

Hollande: the door is still open to Greece

Francois Hollande sounds quite conciliatory, telling the audience in Paris that France and Germany respect the vote of the Greek people yesterday.

The door is still open to talks for Alexis Tsipras to make serious proposals.

Tomorrow’s eurozone crisis summit will allow Europe to define its position, based on the Greek proposals, he says, adding that time is running very short.

Updated

Merkel-Hollande press conference

Angela Merkel and Francois Hollande are speaking to the press now, following their talks on the Greek crisis.

Here’s some photos of Euclid Tsakalotos being sworn in as finance minister tonight:

Swearing in of new Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos<br />epa04834322 Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos (C) and Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (L) during the swearing-in ceremony of new Greek Finance Minister Euclides Tsakalotos (R) at the Presidential Palace in Athens, Greece, 06 July 2015. Greek voters resoundingly rejected bailout terms in a referendum on 05 July. Athens said it was willing to resume talks with international creditors, and eurozone leaders were planning an emergency summit on 07 July to tackle the crisis. EPA/ARMANDO BABANI” width=”1000″ height=”667″ class=”gu-image” /><br />
<figcaption> <span class=Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos (centre) and Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (left) during the swearing-in ceremony of new Greek Finance Minister Euclides Tsakalotos (right). Photograph: Armando Babani/EPA
Swearing in of new Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos<br />epa04834287 New Greek Finance Minister Euclides Tsakalotos during his swearing-in ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Athens, Greece, 06 July 2015. Greek voters resoundingly rejected bailout terms in a referendum on 05 July. Athens said it was willing to resume talks with international creditors, and eurozone leaders were planning an emergency summit on 07 July to tackle the crisis. EPA/ARMANDO BABANI” width=”831″ height=”1000″ class=”gu-image” /> </figure>
<figure class= Prokopis Pavlopoulos, Euclid Tsakalotos<br />Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos, left, shakes hands with the new Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos during the swearing in ceremony at Presidential Palace in Athens, Monday, July 6, 2015. Following Sunday’s referendum the Greece and its membership in Europe’s joint currency faced an uncertain future Monday, with the country under pressure to restart bailout talks with creditors as soon as possible after Greeks resoundingly rejected the notion of more austerity in exchange for aid. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)” width=”1000″ height=”600″ class=”gu-image” /><br />
<figcaption> <span class= Photograph: Petros Karadjias/AP

Tsakalotos has an engagingly dressed-down style, even for a member of the current Greek government (frankly, he could pass for a eurocrisis liveblogger).

But he did make one concession to the majesty of the occasion…..

The US government has urged Europe and Greece to seek a compromise that will avoid Grexit.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest said it was in the best interests of America, and Europe, that the Greek crisis is solved. It is a “European challenge to solve”, he added.

Here’s a video clip of UK finance minister George Osborne updating the British parliament on the Greek crisis today:


Video: Greece referendum: government will protect UK economy, says George Osborne

Osborne has been criticised for not backing calls for Greece to be given debt relief.

Jonathan Stevenson, campaigns officer at the Jubilee Debt Campaign, said:

“The Chancellor was today given several opportunities by MPs from all parties to add his voice to calls for Greek debt cancellation, but he refused to take it. By sitting on the fence, rather than making the case for debt cancellation, he is failing to use his influence to help resolve this crisis, and thereby selling the people of Britain short.

The French stock market suffered from the Greek crisis today, with the CAC index shedding 2%.

Germany’s DAX fell by 1.5%, while in London the FTSE 100 index fell 50 points of 0.7%.

So, electronic red ink everywhere – but not a really serious selloff, given the scale of the shock last night when the referendum results came through.

Tsakalotos sworn in as finance minister

The deed is done. Euclid Tsakalotos has just been sworn in as the new Greek finance minister, by president Prokopis Pavlopoulos.

Updated

This Google Trends data shows how Greeks have been searching for information on leaving the eurozone, and on the implication of yesterday’s referendum:

Google Trends
Photograph: Google
Google Trends
Photograph: Google

Updated

Photos: Merkel and Hollande begin Greek talks

Over in Paris, Francois Hollande has welcomed Angela Merkel to the Elysee Palace for crisis talks about Greece, following yesterday’s referendum.

After a brief smile for the camera, they swiftly got down to business. We’re expecting a joint statement from the two leaders before dinner.

French President Francois Hollande welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel before talks and a dinner at the Elysee Palace in Paris
French President Francois Hollande welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel before talks and a dinner at the Elysee Palace in Paris Photograph: Philippe Wojazer/Reuters
Crisis meeting in Paris between French President and German Chancellor<br />epa04834201 German Chancellor Angela Merkel (2-L) attends a crisis meeting with French President Francois Hollande (unseen) at the Elysee Palace regarding Greece, in Paris, France, 06 July 2015. The leaders met for talks on Greece in the aftermath of the referendum. EPA/ETIENNE LAURENT / POOL MAXPPP OUT” width=”1000″ height=”667″ class=”gu-image” /><br />
<figcaption> <span class= Photograph: ETIENNE LAURENT / POOL/EPA
Crisis meeting in Paris between French President and German Chancellor
Photograph: ETIENNE LAURENT / POOL/EPA

German finance minister Wolfgang Schäuble has insisted that it didn’t have any “personal problems” with Yanis Varoufakis, Greece’s former finance minister.

But it is true that the other euro finance ministers didn’t share Varoufakis’s opinion on many points, Schäuble added.

(that’s via Associated Press)

Here’s Reuters first take on the news that Greek banks won’t reopen tomorrow:

Greek banks will remain closed on Tuesday and Wednesday and a daily limit on cash withdrawals will stay at €60, the head of the Greek banking association said.

Greek banks were shuttered all last week after the collapse of negotiations on an aid deal and had officially been due to reopen on Tuesday, before Greeks voted resoundingly to reject bailout terms sought by creditors in a referendum on Sunday.

“We decided to extend the bank holiday by two days – Tuesday and Wednesday,” Louka Katseli said after a meeting with finance ministry and banking representatives.

GREECE-ATHENS-BAILOUT<br />06 Jul 2015, Athens, Attica, Greece — (150706) — ATHENS, July 6, 2015 (Xinhua) — Greek pensioners without bank cards line up outside bank to withdraw up to 120 euros for the week, in Athens, July 6, 2015. Greek President Prokopis Pavlopoulos convened political leaders for a meeting to design new strategy after the no victory in the July 5 referendum on bailout terms. (Xinhua/Marios Lolos) (dzl) — Image by © Marios Lolos/Xinhua Press/Corbis” width=”1000″ height=”667″ class=”gu-image” /><br />
<figcaption> <span class=Greek pensioners without bank cards line up outside bank to withdraw up to 120 euros for the week, in Athens today. Photograph: Marios Lolos/Xinhua Press/Corbis

Who is Euclid Tsakalotos anyway?

File photo of Varoufakis and Tsakalotos leaving the Maximos Mansion after a meeting with PM Tsipras in Athens<br />Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis (front) and deputy minister for international economic relations Euclid Tsakalotos leave the Maximos Mansion after a meeting with Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (not pictured) in Athens in this April 3, 2015 file photo. Tsakalotos will be sworn in as finance minister on July 6, 2015 after the resignation of Varoufakis, a Greek presidency source said. REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis/Files” width=”1000″ height=”667″ class=”gu-image” /><br />
<figcaption> <span class=Euclid Tsakalotos isn’t in the back seat any more…. Photograph: Alkis Konstantinidis / Reuter/Reuters

Last month, our Athens correspondent Helena Smith explained how the “Phlegmatic, professorial, mild-mannered” Euclid Tsakalotos could be the key to reaching a breakthrough in the Greek crisis.

And as Tsakalotos is Greece’s new finance minister, this theory is about to be tested…..

Here’s a flavour:

The son of a civil engineer who worked in the well-heeled world of Greek shipping, Tsakalotos was born in Rotterdam in 1960. When his family relocated to London, he was immediately enrolled at the exclusive London private school St Paul’s. A place at Oxford, where he studied PPE, ensued. The hurly burly world of radical left politics could not have been further away.

“My grandfather’s cousin was general Thrasyvoulos Tsakalotos who led the other side, the wrong side, in the Greek civil war,” he said of the bloody conflict that pitted communists against rightists between 1946-49.

“He expressed the fear that I might end up as a liberal, certainly not anything further to the left”…

Perish the thought…

Here’s the full piece:

The risk of Greece sliding towards a disorderly exit from the eurozone has “dramatically” increased following the No vote in last night’s referendum.

So warns rating agency Fitch tonight:

An agreement between Greece and its official creditors remains possible, but time is short and the risk of policy missteps, or that the two sides simply cannot agree a deal, is high.

Fitch adds that it will be “difficult” to reaching a deal before 20 July, when Greece must repay €3.5bn to the ECB.

New finance minister to be sworn in tonight.

(FILES) In this file picture taken on June 15, 2015 Greek minister of International Economic Relations Euclidis Tsakalotos arrives for a meeting at the Prime minister’s office in Athens. Greece on July 6, 2015 named economist Euclid Tsakalotos, its top negotiator in the stalled EU-IMF talks, as the country’s new finance minister, the president’s office said. AFP PHOTO / ARIS MESSINISARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images
Photograph: Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images

The Greek government has announced that the new finance minister, Euclid Tsakalotos, will be sworn in by the Greek president at 8pm this evening (6pm BST).

This will allow the Oxford-educated economist to attend tomorrow’s eurogroup meeting and present Greece’s case.

And his first task will be to approve a two-day extension to Greece’s capital controls, meaning banks stay shut until Thursday:

Updated

Greek banks to stay shut

Newsflash: Greece’s banks will not reopen on Tuesday, or indeed on Wednesday, according to the head of the Greek bank association.

The daily withdrawal limit remains at €60.

A couple more lines from George Osborne’s statement to parliament on Greece.

He tells MPs that Britain has sent tax officials out on secondment in recent years, to assist with revenue collection.

Unfortunately, tax collection has “almost dried up” since the crisis escalated.

And the chancellor says Britain can’t suspend pension payments to expats in Greece, to protect them from capital controls. That would risk triggering financial problems, if people had set up rent payments, and suchlike.

And the worst thing for Britain, and the world, would be a completely disorderly situation in the next few weeks. That’s why we are urging all sides to reach a solution.

(FILES) In this file picture taken on March 7, 2015 guest speaker Euclid Tsakalotos of Greek Syriza party addresses the Republican party Sinn Fein annual conference in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Greece on July 6, 2015 named economist Euclid Tsakalotos, its top negotiator in the stalled EU-IMF talks, as the country’s new finance minister, the president’s office said. AFP PHOTO / PAUL FAITHPAUL FAITH/AFP/Getty Images
Back in March, Euclid Tsakalotos addressed the Republican party Sinn Fein annual conference in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Photograph: Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images

Back in Greece, Euclid Tsakalotos is being appointed as Greece’s new finance minister to replace Yanis Varoufakis, as had been rumoured.

One official told Reuters:

“Tsakalotos will be sworn in with the political oath as finance minister,”

As mentioned earlier, Tsakalotos is known as the brain behind Syriza’s economics policies, and has been handling the day-to-day negotiations with creditors for the last couple of months.

Updated

Labour MP Gisela Stuart asks:

Does Britain have any plans to fly euros into Greece to pay our pensioners, if they cannot get money out of the cash machines?

Osborne says that Britain has “a number of contingency plans, and we just hope we don’t have to put them into operation.”

Two years ago, when Cyprus imposed capital controls, Britain flew out large quantities of euros in military planes to pay soldiers based in the country.

Andrew Tyrie, a senior MP who chairs Britain’s influential Treasury Committee, asks George Osborne if he agrees that Greece can never repay all its debt, or return to sustainable growth at the current eurozone exchange rate.

Shouldn’t Greece issue its own currency?

Osborne won’t be tempted to give an opinion. We don’t like it when other counties tell Britain what currency to use, so it’s up to Greece to decide its own currency.

But, the challenge is balancing Greece’s desire to stay in the euro with the conditions that other eurozone members wish to put on it, he adds.

Osborne sums up the challenge facing Greece rather neatly.

There are two different timetables, the chancellor says — the political one, of meetings and negotiations to reach a possible deal, which proceeds quite slowly.

And there is the situation in the Greek banking sector, which is moving at a much faster pace.

The challenge for the eurozone and the challenge for greece is to bring those timetables together.

George Osborne says that tomorrow’s eurogroup and eurozone leaders meetings are crucial for Greece, although tonight’s Franco-German meeting (between Merkel and Hollande) is also important.

Chris Leslie, the shadow chancellor, warns that the European Union faces its most “fundamental test” in a generation.

George Osborne
George Osborne in parliament today Photograph: BBC Parliament

Osborne: Risks to Britain from Greece are growing

George Osborne, Britain’s chancellor of the Exchequer, is speaking in parliament now.

He met with prime minister David Cameron and Bank of England governor Mark Carney earlier today.

Osborne warns MPs that the prospects of a happy ending in Greece are diminishing, while the risks to Britain from Greece are growing, so it’s right to remain vigilant.

The financial situation in Greece will “deteriorate rapidly” if there is no sign of agreement at tomorrow’s talks.

Osborne says:

This is a critical moment in the economic crisis in Greece. No-one should be under any illusions. The situation risks going from bad to worse…

Osborne tells MPs that the UK government will continue to pay state pensions to expats in Greece “in the normal way” , but also warns that tourists should take sufficient money, and medicines, to cover their stay.

The government has already been in touch with 2,000 pensioners to help them switch to UK bank accounts.

The Department for Business is providing advice to firms having problems dealing with companies in Greece, he adds.

And Britain is boosting its consular operations in Greece.

Updated

With his duties at the finance ministry over, Yanis Yaroufakis can now turn his attention to more mundane issues – like his new book.

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (C) Minister of State Nikos Pappas (L) and Government spokesman Gavriil Sakellaridis (2-R) leave the Presidential Palace after a meeting with party leaders in Athens on July 6, 2015. Germany dismissed Greece’s bid to clinch a quick, new debt deal after the country delivered a resounding ‘No’ to more austerity measures, appearing little moved by the surprise resignation of the Greek finance minister.IAKOVOS HATZISTAVROU/AFP/Getty Images
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (C) Minister of State Nikos Pappas (left) and Government spokesman Gabriel Sakellaridis (second right) leaving the Presidential Palace after a meeting with party leaders in Athens today. Photograph: Iakovos Hatzistavrou/AFP/Getty Images

What does yesterday’s No vote mean for Europe? How can Angela Merkel respond? Will the departure of Yanis Varoufakis help?

Guardian columnist Jonathan Freedland and economics editor Larry Elliott explain all, in barely 180 seconds…..


Video: Three-minute update: the Greeks have spoken. What now for the rest of Europe?

German media are reporting that Alexis Tsipras and Angela Merkel have telephoned (as we flagged earlier), with both leaders agreeing that Greece will bring new proposals with him to the Euro group meeting which may help to overcome the crisis.

Further details of what they discussed have yet to emerge.

Also, a Spiegel correspondent in Greece, Giorgis Christides, is reporting that paper supplies are running out in Greece, with newspaper publishers saying they had enough paper left to print only up until next Sunday.

One publishing manager has even proposed halting the printing of books, until the shortage eases.

IMF "stands ready to assist Greece"

Lagarde sits for an interview at IMF headquarters in Washington.
Photograph: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), has just issued a short statement on Greece:

“The IMF has taken note of yesterday’s referendum held in Greece. We are monitoring the situation closely and stand ready to assist Greece if requested to do so.”

Snap reaction: Greece heading towards national unity?

The fact that the leaders of three Greek opposition parties have agreed to back prime minister Alexis Tsipras in the debt negotiations is an important development.

The strong No vote in Sunday’s referendum has strengthened Tsipras’s position, as he heads to Brussels tomorrow.

As well as representing his Syriza-ANEL administration, Tsipras now has the backing of New Democracy, To Potami and Pasok.

That only leaves the KKE communist party on the sidelines, and the extreme right-wing Golden Dawn.

Commentators reckon it could be the first step towards a new ‘national unity’ administration to tackle the crisis.

UK chancellor George Osborne due to address the UK parliament on the Greek situation shortly. My colleague Andrew Sparrow is covering it all in his politics liveblog.

The centre-left Pasok party has also agreed to back Alexis Tsipras in the looming debt negotiations.

Fofi Genimata, Pasok’s leader, did criticise the PM for only rallying support “at the eleventh hour”.

New Democracy, the centre-right opposition party, will also sign the common statement expressing support for Alexis Tsipras in negotiations with lenders.

ND was represented by Vangelis Meimaraki at today’s meeting, following the resignation of leader Antonis Samaras last night.

Meimaraki criticised Tsipras for calling today’s meeting so late, and said the PM bears responsibility for the crisis. But crucially, he did still sign the statement:

Ah, it appears that the communist KKE party will not support this joint statement from Greece’s political leaders:

(that’s Kammenos in the middle)

Greek political leaders to release joint statement

The meeting of Greece’s political leaders is breaking up in Athens, after more than six hours.

And Panos Kammenos, the head of the right-wing ANEL party which is coalition with Alexis Tsiprass’ Syriza, is telling reporters that the leaders will release a “joint statement”.

That will be a written assurance that the opposition leaders support Tsipras in his negotiations with creditors, Kammenos says – along with a reference to debt relief.

Stavros Theodorakis of the centrist To Potami party is also speaking. He confirms that a common statement will be drawn up. ahead of Tuesday’s emergency eurozone summit.

Updated

US stock markets have opened after the July 4 holiday long weekend and so far reaction to the Greek crisis is muted.

The Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq are all down around 0.5% in early trading.

So far US investors have largely shrugged off the Greek crisis and it looks like they same mood will prevail today. But anything can happen. During the last Euro-crisis US markets went on a roller coaster ride as investors worried about “contagion” and Greek woes spreading across Europe.

Yanis, we’re going to miss you

Alexis Tsipras must bring serious proposals to Brussels tomorrow to tackle the crisis created by his referendum, says German MEP Manfred Weber.

Weber, who chairs the centre-right EPP Group in the European Parliament, has also tweeted his concern that the “No” victory will drive nationalism in Europe.

The heads of Greece’s political parties are still meeting with president Pavlopoulos, as they discuss their response to Sunday’s referendum.

Simon Marks of MNI is tweeting from outside the talks:

Yanis Varoufakis does know how to make an exit (if not a Grexit)…..

Greece’s maverick finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, who announced his surprise resignation leaves the Ministry of Finance with his wife Danai on the back of a motorbike in downtown Athens, on July 6 2015. Germany dismissed Greece’s bid to clinch a quick new debt deal after the country delivered a resounding ‘No’ to more austerity, appearing little moved by the surprise resignation of the Greek finance minister. AFP PHOTO / ANDREAS SOLAROANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty Images
Greece’s maverick finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, who announced his surprise resignation leaves the Ministry of Finance with his wife Danae on the back of a motorbike in downtown Athens. Photograph: Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images
Greece’s maverick finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, who announced his surprise resignation leaves the Ministry of Finance with his wife Danai on the back of a motorbike in downtown Athens, on July 6 2015.
Photograph: Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

Updated

Bank closures could continue for a few more days – report

BREAKING:

Greece will issue a new decree today to extend the bank holiday for a few more days, bankers are telling Reuters.

Greece to present new proposals on Tuesday

Sigmar Gabriel’s warning that Greece faces insolvency came as Alexis Tsipras and Angela Merkel ended their telephone call.

Greek officials say that Tsipras agreed to present a “comprehensive” Greek proposal for an aid deal at Tuesday’s emergency leaders summit.

Updated

Germany’s vice chancellor is warning that a third Greek bailout would include taxing conditions, as it would be issued under the European Stability Mechanism:

Gabriel is also worried that other bailed-out eurozone nations will demand help, if they see Greece getting relief:

Greece threatened with insolvency, says Germany’s Gabriel

The hard line from Germany continues.

Deputy chancellor and economy minister Sigmar Gabriel has said Greece is now threatened with insolvency. And if it wants to stay in the eurozone it has to present proposals that go beyond what it has offered before.

Yanis Varoufakis says he hopes Euclid Tsakalotos gets the hot seat in the finance ministry.

Euclid does have decent credentials; a PhD in economics from Oxford, followed by academic postings, and a reputation as the “big brain” of Syriza’s economic policy making.

Standard Chartered has already said his appointment would make a positive outcome more likely (see here)

And he’ll have lots to talk to the UK chancellor about, too:

Updated

The Kremlin has issued a brief statement on the telephone call between Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras and Russian President Vladimir Putin:

On Greece’s initiative, Vladimir Putin had a telephone conversation with Prime Minister of Greece Alexis Tsipras.

Mr Putin and Mr Tsipras discussed the results of the Greek referendum on international creditors’ conditions for providing financial aid to Athens, and discussed several matters concerning further development of bilateral cooperation.

Mr Putin expressed his support for the Greek people in overcoming the country’s current difficulties.

Was it the Daily Telegraph that did it?

The Wall Street Journal has an intriguing theory to explain Yanis Varoufakis’s shock resignation this morning.

They say that Alexis Tsipras decided to jettison his finance minister after he told the Telegraph that Greece could start issuing its own IOU notes to run alongside the euro, if the liquidity squeeze choking Greece isn’t lifted.

Here’s that interview:

Daily Telegraph: Defiant Greeks reject EU demands as Syriza readies IOU currency

Lunchtime summary

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, second from right, arrives for a Greek political leaders meeting in Athens this morning.
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, second from right, arrives for a Greek political leaders meeting in Athens this morning. Photograph: Petros Giannakouris/AP

Time for a recap.

Yanis Varoufakis has ended a dramatic five-month stint as Greece’s finance minister, resigning just hours after Greece delivered a resounding No to the bailout conditions pushed by the country’s creditors.

Varoufakis said he fell on his sword after being:

made aware of a certain preference by some Eurogroup participants, and assorted ‘partners’, for my … ‘absence’ from its meetings.

And he remained resolute to the end, declaring:

I shall wear the creditors’ loathing with pride.

He also hailed last night’s referendum results as “a unique moment when a small European nation rose up against debt-bondage.”

His successor hasn’t been announced yet; Euclid Tsakalotos, who took over day-to-day management of negotiations, is one frontrunner.

Greek leaders have been locked in talks for hours this morning, discussing their next move.

Prime minister Alexis Tsipras has been busy – he’s speaking with German chancellor Angela Merkel right now.

Earlier, he held a phone call with Russian president Vladimir Putin.

The scale of yesterday’s No vote has stunned Europe this morning, as leaders prepare for Tuesday’s emergency summit.

Italy’s Matteo Renzi has just posted on Facebook that Europe must find permanent solution to the Greek crisis and go beyond austerity.

But European Commission vice-president Valdis Dombrovskis has warned that the No vote makes the situation even more complicated.

Angela Merkel and Francois Hollande are due to meet tonight in Paris to discuss the crisis. UK prime minister David Cameron has already held a meeting in London to discuss the impact on Britain response.

The Greek banking system continues to creak after a week of capital controls; some ATM machines are now only dispensing €50 per day, rather than the €60 limit.

The European Central Bank will hold a conference call later to discuss the emergency liquidity assistance it provides to Greece, which was capped eight days ago.

In the European markets, shares have fallen as the threat of a disorderly Grexit rises.

Here’s the situation at lunchtime in the City:

  • FTSE 100: down 40 points at 6545, -0.6%
  • German DAX: down 170 points at 10890, -1.5%
  • French CAC: down 89 points at 4718, -1.9%

The yields (interest rates) on Spanish and Italian government bonds have risen today, as investors view them as riskier. But it’s not a massive sell-off (the yield on Spanish 10-year debt has risen from 2.22% to 2.35% this morning)

Jens Nordvig of Japanese bank Nomura argues:

Those betting on run-away contagion as a result of Greece getting on an exit path will have to re-think….

The so-called domino theory is looking increasingly old-fashioned.

Meanwhile Rosie Scammell has helpfully done a translation of the comments from Italian prime minister Matteo Renzi on his Facebook page.

There are two areas…to confront quickly in European capitals and Brussels. The first regards Greece, a country that is in a very difficult economic and social situation. The meetings tomorrow must indicate a definitive road to resolve this emergency.

The second – even more fascinating and complex, but no longer postponable – is that of Europe. For months we have been insisting on discussing not only austerity and budgets, but growth, infrastructure, common policies on migration, innovation, the environment. In one word: politics, not only parameters. Values, not only numbers.

If we stay at a standstill, prisoners of rules and bureaucracy, Europe is finished.

Rebuilding a different Europe will not be easy, after what has happened in recent years. But this is the right moment to try and do it, all together. Italy will do its part.

The downbeat comments about the prospects of a new deal with Greece, notably from Germany and the European Commission’s Valdis Dombrovskis, have seen the euro lose nearly all the gains it made after news came in of Yanis Varoufakis’ resignation as Greek finance minister.

Euro midday
Euro loses early gains against the dollar. Photograph: Reuters/Reuters

And here’s AP’s summary of the earlier comments from Angela Merkel’s spokesman about the conditions not being there for new negotiations with Greece:

Chancellor Angela Merkel’s spokesman says Germany sees no basis at present for entering negotiations on a new bailout program for Greece, but that the door remains open.

Steffen Seibert said Monday that Germany respects the “clear ‘no’ vote” by Greeks against austerity measures demanded by creditors and that “the door for talks always remains open.”

However, he said the conditions are “not there at present to enter negotiations on a new program.” He said the “no” vote is a vote against the principle still supported by Germany that solidarity requires countries to take responsibility.

Seibert says Europe will explore what possibilities there are to help Greek citizens and “a lot will depend on what proposals the Greek government now puts on the table.”

Merkel arrives at the chancellery in Berlin this morning.
Merkel arrives at the chancellery in Berlin this morning. Photograph: Fabrizio Bensch/REUTERS

Greek debt reduction not on Germany’s agenda

Following the downbeat comments earlier from German government spokesman Steffen Seibert, the country’s finance ministry has now said a reduction in Greece’s debt mountain is not on Germany’s agenda. Associated Press reports:

Ministry spokesman Martin Jaeger said “our position is well-known … a debt cut is not an issue for us.”

He said there were no grounds for a debt restructuring given that Greece has yet to set out fresh proposals for financial aid.

Last week, the International Monetary Fund, which has been a major creditor of Greece over the past five years, suggested that debt relief for Greece is necessary.

Jaeger says Europe decided that economic reforms coupled with aid was a better route to a sustainable future for Greece, adding that it was working well in the country, until the end of last year.

Jaeger said he didn’t see much need to change this approach, noting the success of other bailed-out countries.

Italy’s Renzi says permanent solution must be found

Another sign we’re in the age of social media dominance: Italian prime minister Matteo Renzi has said Europe must find a permanent solution to the Greek crisis – via a Facebook post.

(Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis earlier announced his resignation by Twitter/blog)

Speaking of Russia, the country has said Greece and its creditors should reach a compromise as soon as possible. Bloomberg reports it is watching developments “closely” following the referendum:

“We treat with respect the voice raised during the plebiscite,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on a conference call on Monday. Russia would like Greece to take decisions that contribute to “social and economical stability in the country,” he said.

Greece has never asked Russia for financial aid in dealing with the debt crisis, Peskov said. Greek issues might be discussed on the sidelines of a BRICS summit in Ufa this week of leaders from Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, though they are not on the official agenda, he said.

Full story here.

And this meeting of Greek party leaders may never end….

Helena Smith adds:

Reports now coming through that Tsipras has broken away from meeting with other party leaders to talk with German chancellor Angela Merkel.

Greek television channels have been breaking into scheduled programmes to announce that prime minister Alexis Tsipras will cut short the meeting currently taking place of political party leaders at the presidential palace to speak with Russia’s Vladimir Putin, reports Helena Smith. (We mentioned this possiblity earlier). Helena writes:

The two men will speak by phone. The cross party meeting of political leaders will then resume.

Interestingly, says, Helena, the Greek energy minister, Panagiotis Lafazanis, who has close ties with Moscow and heads the militant wing of Tsipras’ Syriza party, has also rushed to the presidential palace.

Tsipras and Putin in June
Tsipras and Putin in June Photograph: TASS / Barcroft Media/TASS / Barcroft Media

Meanwhile in Thessaloniki, people are hoping the no vote will prompt a resolution, finally, to the financial crisis. Angelique Chrisafis reports:

Stefanos Dimos was standing at his Thessaloniki flower shop, which for 62 years has been arranging bouquets to mark the births, deaths and weddings of locals in Greece’s second city. He had been weathering the crisis for five years, but this morning, after Greece’s resounding no vote, he said he felt optimistic.

In five years of austerity, Dimos had seen his trade fall by 50% and had to lay off two staff. Since last week the capital controls and bank closures that are still in place have seen his trade drop 90%, despite the summer wedding season. “The economy has virtually stopped,” he said. But like many “No” voters, Dimos, 52, held the prime minisiter Alexis Tsipiras to his word that there would be a new negotiation and a better deal for Greece. “We’re optimistic that there will be an agreement that is good for Greece and good for Europe. The “No” vote was a good result because it sent a clear message that we can’t have any more austerity. I see people foraging in bins here every day for food, something that didn’t happen before the crisis.”

He added: “We’re hoping that the deal will be improved, that debt will be eased, allowing business activity to start up again. Things have ground to a halt.”

Another florist in the city centre said he was happy with last night’s strong “No” result, even though he himself had tentatively voted “Yes”. He said: “I voted yes because I wanted Greece to stay in Europe. But I’m still pleased today because — like everyone else — I don’t want more austerity. I’m happy with the outcome as it voiced our feeling that we can’t take it any more. Austerity has been a dead-end for growth and for our economy.”

Outside a nearby bank, a small queue of pensioners gathered early to access limited amounts to their pensions, and a small line of others waited to withdraw their daily €60. One lawyer who had voted yes said: “There’s an urgency in getting a new deal as fast as possible because banks are facing a real liquidity problem, they can’t last much longer. Any new deal now has to satisfy all the other eurozone members, it’s not going to be easy. In fact, it’s going to be very difficult here.”

Constantin Petropoulous, 88, and his wife Georgia, 80, were standing at the back of the queue, waiting to access a portion of their monthly pensions that had shrunk to €600. Like many in the city, they had spent decades as labourers in Germany, where Constantin had worked for Bosch in Stuttgart, returing to Thessaloniki to later work in a shop. “The real challenge for Greece this week is this feeling of the unknown, the uncertainty,” he said. “Whether the vote had been yes or no, things would have been difficult. We know it will be a very hard week. We just have to be patient.”

The European Central Bank’s governing council is due to discuss emergency funding to Greek banks in a telephone call later this afternoon, sources have told Reuters.

In Athens, cash machines are increasingly failing to dispense the full amount allowed under the current capital controls. John Hooper reports:

A tour of banks in the capital this morning showed that, while depositors are notionally allowed €60 a day under the capital controls, increasingly €50 is the norm. That could help explain why the government is reportedly confident that Greece’s ATMs can continue to dole out cash till Friday.

Of seven cash machines visited, only two were dispensing the full amount, ostensibly because the banks are running out of €20 notes. At Alpha Bank on Alexandras Avenue, Irene Abatzi said: “I don’t care if it’s fifty or sixty, just so long as the machine carries on giving out cash.”

A woman withdraws money from an ATM machine while others speak to an official of the bank in Athens.
A woman withdraws money from an ATM machine while others speak to an official of the bank in Athens. Photograph: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images

Elsewhere, customers were less phlegmatic. A man in the up-market quarter of Kolonaki exploded with rage when he found out that a payment had not been made to his account, and that he could not withdraw anything.

The banks were opening their doors to pensioners, but in at least two parts of the city the pensioners were being told that only those who failed to get their pensions last week could be served. The deputy finance minister, Nadia Valavani, highlighted the intensity of the cash squeeze in a statement on Sunday, telling safe deposit owners they could retrieve valuables – but only with a bank employee standing over them to ensure they did not take out cash as well.

In Spain Pablo Iglesias, leader of the anti-austerity party Podemos, welcomed the results of the Greek referendum but cautioned those who sought to draw parallels between Spain and Greece. Ashifa Kassam in Madrid reports:

“It’s a very clear message,” Iglesias told Spanish radio Cadena Ser. “The citizens of Greece have said that austerity isn’t the way to end the economic crisis.”

He called on Europe’s leaders to reach an agreement with Greece, pointing to the resignation of Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis. “Now there is no excuse. The time has come for sensibility and to find a reasonable agreement.”

On Varoufakis’ resignation he said: “It hurt me a lot because I think he’s an excellent economist….but I think the act of resigning is honorable as it will help the push for the agreement that his country needs.”

With a general election due in Spain by the end of the year, Iglesias carefully chose his words, knowing that the situation in Greece could drive moderate voters away from his party. “We have a great friendship with Syriza, but luckily, Spain is not Greece. We’re an economy with much more weight in the eurozone, we’re a country with a stronger administration and with a better economic situation,” he said, taking aim at the many comparisons being drawn between Spain and Greece. “The circumstances are different and I think it makes no sense to draw these parallels.”

Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias.
Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias. Photograph: Susana Vera/Reuters

The situation in Greece has been used by the governing People’s Party to justify the austerity measures imposed during the height of the economic crisis. “Fortunately Spain has a prime minister who said no to the bailout and instead undertook reforms,” PP vice-president Fernando Martínez-Maillo told broadcaster Radio Nacional de España on Monday. “Thanks to those reforms…we’re in a situation of economic growth and job creation.”

Spain’s finance minister, Luis de Guindos said on Monday that although the No vote made the situation more complex, everyone wants Greece to “stay in the euro.” His government is ready to talk about a third bailout, he added, but only if Greece was willing to play by the rules.

Eleni Varvitsiotis of Greek newspaper Kathimerini is not very upbeat about Dombrovskis:

More from Dombrovskis:

EC’s Dombrovskis says no vote complicates things

European Commissioner vice president Valdis Dombrovskis has said the no vote complicates the situation, but Greece’s place remains in the eurozone.

My colleague Jennifer Rankin notes:

Updated

Britain has called on Greece and its eurozone partners to sit down together and find a sustainable solution, Reuters reports.

Prime minister David Cameron’ spokeswoman said finding a solution was clearly in Britain’s best interests, and Britain supports a 28 member EU.

Meanwhile the ECB’s Ewald Nowotny, also president of the National Bank of Austria, said any new Greek deal needs time. To expect an agreement within two days – as Greece had suggested – is “illusionary.”

And regarding the emergency liquidity assistance for Greek banks:

Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras has reportedly already been on the phone to European Central Bank president Mario Draghi – not surprising when the ECB has to decide its next move with regard to Greek banks.

Meanwhile Tsipras will apparently also speak to Russian president Putin on the phone before the end of the day.

And here’s a bit of a dampener on things, from Austria’s Finance Minister Hans Joerg Schelling:

But he did say he hopes talks would be easier now Varoufakis has gone.

Updated

What happens next?

So what happens next, for Greece’s bailout negotiations, the country’s banks, its future in the eurozone? Here is our updated assessment of where we stand:

And as a tribute to Yanis Varoufakis brief but colourful period as Greek finance minister, here is a piece of video from 1993. As an economics professor he was discussing government policies and, topically, austerity.

Varoufakis
Varoufakis in 1993 Photograph: Greek TV via Youtube

Spain’s economy minister Luis de Guindos has echoed that Greece should remain part of the eurozone and the euro is irreversible.

He said the Spanish government was open to negotiating a third bailout, and any new Greek package should include a comprehensive analysis of Greek needs.

(Quotes courtesy Reuters).

Luis de Guindos.
Luis de Guindos. Photograph: Andrea Comas/Reuters

Angela Merkel’s spokesman say conditions for Greek talks not in place

Conditions for talks with Greece are not in place, German government spokesman Steffen Seibert has said.

But Greece is part of the eurozone and the government must act to make sure this remains the case. Germany is now waiting for the new proposals from Greece:

Updated

Donald Tusk, President of the European Council, has confirmed this morning’s conference call and its participants:

George Osborne to make Commons statement on Greece

UK chancellor George Osborne is set to make a statement about Greece in the Commons at around 3.30 today. Earlier Osborne met prime minister David Cameron and Bank of England governor Mark Carney to discuss the crisis:

Greek banks can keep allowing withdrawals until Friday, depending on what happens with the ECB, the BBC’s Robert Peston has reported:

Meanwhile, earlier:

The Eurogroup – which as we said earlier is to meet on Tuesday – has said it expects new proposals from Greece. In a statement it said:

The Eurogroup will discuss the situation following the referendum in Greece that was held on 5 July 2015. Ministers expect new proposals from the Greek authorities.

The referendum was held after the Greek government unilaterally withdrew from ongoing negotiations with the institutions (the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund) on Greece’s comprehensive reform plan, foreseen under the agreement of February 2015.

Greece likely to be on BRICS summit agenda

There has been no official reaction from the Kremlin yet about the Greek vote, writes Shaun Walker, but Russia has been watching the drama unfold between Athens and Brussels with some interest, and Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras has made two visits to Moscow in recent months to make the point that Greece could seek alternative creditors. He has left with little in the way of concrete commitments, however.

A summit of the BRICS group of nations (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) will be held in the Russian city of Ufa later this week and Greece is likely to be on the agenda. Various ideas have been floated in recent weeks, including making Greece a member of the club, which would give it access to loans from the newly founded BRICS development bank.

However, while Moscow might be keen on the idea for political reasons, Russia is also still in a difficult financial situation, and the other BRICS members may well be less keen.

The Eurogroup will be meeting tomorrow ahead of the eurozone leaders’ summit, its president Jeroen Dijsselbloem has just said:

As the European Central Bank decides about liquidity for Greek banks – ahead of the July 20 date for the country to repay €3.5bn on a bond held by the ECB – economist Dario Perkins at Lombard Street Research points to one possible outcome:

Updated

UK papers have reflected the uncertainty over the what comes next for the eurozone, as Roy Greenslade reports:

Crisis, chaos, turmoil. Today’s British national newspaper headlines reflect the seriousness of the situation facing the European Union and the eurozone after the referendum vote in Greece.

Several of the newspapers also convey the sense of bafflement at what happens next: “Europe faces crisis after gambling Greeks say No” (The Times); “Europe in turmoil as Greeks vote No” (Daily Telegraph); “Greek ‘no’ plunges Europe into crisis” (The Independent); “Greeks vote ‘no’ – Europe shudders (i); and “Greece’s eurozone future hangs in balance as No vote set to triumph” (Financial Times).

The Daily Mail and Daily Express engage in some prediction: “Meltdown: EU in crisis as Greece votes ‘no’ to crippling cuts and heads for eurozone exit” and “Greece ready to leave the Euro after day of chaos”.

Two prefer to state the bald fact: “Greek voters defy Europe” (The Guardian) and “Greeks vote no” (Metro). And the red-tops, being the red-tops, indulge in puns: “Greeky bum time” (The Sun); “Rhodes to ruin?” (Daily Mirror); and “It’s Greece frightenin’.” (Daily Star).

But there is nothing to smile about in the editorials, several of which refer to it, predictably, as a “Greek tragedy.” Newspapers opposed to the EU or, at the least, to the euro, barely conceal their delight at the possible unravelling of the eurozone.

Full story here:

Here’s Alexis Tsipras and his colleagues at their meeting this morning to discuss their next move after the no victory in the referendum:

Tsipras arrives for the meeting.
Tsipras arrives for the meeting. Photograph: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images
Meeting begins.
Meeting begins. Photograph: Petros Giannakouris/AP

Earlier Tsipras met Greek president Prokopis Pavlopoulos:

Tsipras visits Pavlopoulos.
Tsipras visits Pavlopoulos. Photograph: Imago / Barcroft Media/imago/Wassilis Aswestopoulos

ECB member and Bank of France governor Christian Noyer has been commenting on Greek finances:

This refers to Greek debt held by the ECB, which he says cannot be restructured because it would be monetary financing of a state.

According to the bookies, Greece will not leave the eurozone this year but Britain is likely to vote to leave the EU in a referendum:

European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker will hold a conference call with the Eurogroup and European Central Bank (among others) this morning.

In a statement the commission said it “takes note of and respects the result of the referendum in Greece,” and added:

President Juncker is consulting (…) with the democratically elected leaders of the other 18 Eurozone members as well as with the Heads of the EU institutions. He will have a conference call among the “Euro-Institutionals” (with the President of the Euro Summit, the President of the Euro Group and the President of the European Central Bank) on Monday morning. He intends to address the European Parliament in Strasbourg on Tuesday.

On Tuesday 7 July at 18h a special Euro Summit will take place to discuss the situation after the referendum in Greece.

Updated

Fabio Sdogati, professor of International Economics at Politecnico di Milano, the largest technical university in Italy, is clearly a Varoufakis fan:

More from Simon Goodley on IG’s trading floor:

Despite Greece being the world’s biggest financial story since, er, the last time Greece was the world’s biggest financial story, there is surprisingly little activity in the equity markets, where volumes are low. According to Alastair McCaig, market analyst at IG, this is because investors don’t like uncertainty and nobody knows what is going to happen next.

He said: “Ask politicians what is happening with Greece and they say ‘I don’t know’. Markets are the same. Greece has surprised at every opportunity. Last week they surprised by calling a referendum. This week they surprised by voting ‘no’. They have the propensity to surprise again”.

Added to that, there is also the wobbly Chinese stock market, which is causing further nervousness (and which here they suspect is a bigger markets story) plus the fact that we are currently inhabiting a month between May and September – a section of the year the City tends to like to take off.

European markets down, Greek bond yields higher

European markets remain in the red, but are not in freefall:

European markets
European markets Photograph: Reuters/Reuters

The bond markets are more volatile.

Greek 10 year bond yields are back above 17% at 17.3% while two year yields are up 13 percentage points at a hefty 48% (although Reuters is reporting no trading is going on.)

Meanwhile Spanish 10-year yields are up marginally at 2.3%, Italy’s are at 2.32% and Portugal at 3%.

Updated

So, is Grexit more or less likely now given the developments of the last few hours:

However:

Euclid Tsakalotos, the Oxford-educated chief spokesman of the economics ministry, has been tipped as the most likely replacement for Yanis Varoufakis, writes Jennifer Rankin.

“He is one of the most sensible/moderate figures in Syriza and his appointment, if confirmed, would increase the chances for a sensible negotiation and a positive outcome,” Demetrios Efstathiou of Standard Chartered bank said.

Euclid Tsakalotos (left) with Yanis Varoufakis.
Euclid Tsakalotos (left) with Yanis Varoufakis. Photograph: Alkis Konstantinidis/REUTERS

Back in the bond markets and UK 10-year gilt yields have hit their lowest level since mid-June, with investors seeing the UK as something of a haven.

The no vote raises the risk of Greece leaving the eurozone, but the basis for a dialogue between the two sides still exists, according to French finance minister Michel Sapin.

He also said discussions of possible debt relief were “not taboo” and said France had put this proposal on the table. MNI reports:

“The ‘no’ carries a considerable risk for Greece,” Sapin told Europe 1 radio. “In this risk for Greece is the risk of an exit from the euro. But there is nothing automatic.”

Sapin said that “there is on the table a basis for dialogue but it is up to Greece to show that it will take this dialogue seriously.” He said it was “up to the Greek government and Mr. Tsipras to make new proposals as quickly as possible.”

Sapin declined to comment on the possible reaction of the European Central Bank to the Greek vote, other than to say that “there is a level today of liquidity. This level of liquidity cannot be reduced.”

Michel Sapin.
Michel Sapin. Photograph: CHAMUSSY/SIPA/REX Shutterstock/CHAMUSSY/SIPA/REX Shutterstock

Greek bond yields are currently up 139 basis points at 16.24% but they have been higher this morning:

View from the trading room floor

“The Greek bloke’s resigned. He’s run rings round ‘em.”

That was how one IG trader was overheard explaining the news of the resignation of Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis following Sunday’s referendum, as he chatted on the phone in early trading this morning, writes Simon Goodley.

To say the City is surprised by the news coming out of Greece is an understatement. Like eurozone officials it had expected that last week’s trailer of capital controls would be enough to get the country to vote yes, and IG priced a yes vote as a 60% chance last week.

So what now? Chris Beauchamp, senior market analyst at IG, said: “[German stock market] the Dax has opened down but is surging back – much like it did last Monday and much like the euro is doing. It is coming back on Varoufakis’s resignation – possibly more hope than expectation, but if you take out the most irritating man in the room then you might get a more reasonable response from Germany and France”.

Updated

And here’s a (typical) reaction from London mayor Boris Johnson:

Some timings for German comments on the Greece situation, courtesy Reuters:

German chancellor Merkel arrives at the Chancellery in Berlin this morning
German chancellor Merkel arrives at the Chancellery in Berlin this morning Photograph: Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters

Elsewhere German industrial orders fell by just 0.2% in May, better than an expected 0.4% decline, despite the current eurozone crisis.

Economist Dr. Andreas Rees at UniCredit said:

After two consecutive and strong rises, German new orders in the manufacturing sector declined a moderate 0.2% month on month. The latest decrease is neither driven by a fundamental deterioration nor by the events in Greece.

The direct macro impact is limited, as only 0.4% of all German exports are shipped to Greece. The same is true for other eurozone countries. The most likely scenario going forward is that German companies (and their peers in the eurozone) will resume momentum in the next few months.

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi is due to meet his finance minister, Pier Carlo Padoan, at 9.30am (8.30am BST) today to discuss the Greek referendum, writes Rosie Scammell. As the result came in last night, Padoan took to Twitter to share his views on the vote:

(Italy has always worked for a solid and more integrated Europe. It was true yesterday and it will still be true tomorrow.)

(Shared rules by European peoples serve to guarantee the same objectives: affluence through economic growth and employment )

(Reforms and investments are in all countries the key to regain sustainable growth)

The Greek government spokesman has just said Varoufakis’ replacement will be announced after the meeting of party political leaders. That would suggest the leftist-led government is attempting to find consensus over the issue, Helena Smith reports.

The spokesman said.

As finance minister Yanis Varoufakis placed a leading role in negotiations from the government’s first day. The prime minister feels the need to thank him for his ceaseless effort to promote the positions of the government and the interests of the Greek people under very difficult circumstances. After the meeting of political leaders, his replacement will be announced.

Updated

Tsipras to decide on Varoufakis replacement

Over in Athens our correspondent Helena Smith says prime minister Alexis Tsipras is now debating who to replace his finance minister with. She writes:

Talks are being held between deputy prime minister Yannis Dragasakis and Tsipras as I write with the sole purpose of deciding who should replace Yanis Varoufakis.

Dragasakis, a former Marxist who is also an economist, is himself one of the contenders. The low-profile politician has had broad oversight of Greece’s economic policy over the last five months – and had expressed growing displeasure with Varoufakis’ tactics. But the 67-year-old may well wish to remain behind the scenes where he has a particularly powerful role.

That leaves the economics professor Giorgos Stathakis, currently the economics minister and the Oxford-educated economist Euclid Tsakalotos, who has had a lead role coordinating negotiations.

George Chouliarakis, the Manchester University academic heading the Greek government’s negotiating team – whose moderate views and comportment has been particularly well received by creditors – is reportedly also being considered.

Banking shares are among the major fallers, given the prospect of contagion from the struggling Greek banking system.

Deutsche Bank is down 2.7%, Santander 2.6% and Italy’s Monte Dei Paschi is 3.5% lower. In the UK Barclays and HSBC have both fallen around 1.2%.

But generally the reaction so far has been fairly subdued – at least compared to the expected falls.

Of course, the surprise resignation of Yanis Varoufakis has probably helped limit the damage, since it could well make negotiations easier when leaders meet on Tuesday.

European markets open lower

After shares fell sharply in Asia after the no vote in the Greek referendum, European markets are following suit.

The FTSE 100 is currently down just over 1% or 70 points but this is less than the 130 originally expected. Early days yet, of course.

Germany’s Dax is down around 2%, Spain’s Ibex is off 2.2%, Italy’s FTSE MIB is 2.8% lower and France’s Cac has fallen 2%.

Other events to watch out for today:

  • The UK government and the Bank of England are to review continency plans
  • Germany’s Angela Merkel and France’s Francois Hollande are to meet tonight ahead of a leaders’ summit on Tuesday
  • Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras is putting together his new negotiating team

More reaction, this time from Italy. Rosie Scammell writes:

Italy’s newspapers are today awash with Greek flags, with most leading on the impact the no vote will have on Europe. “Greece, a slap in Brussels’ face” reads the front page of left-leaning daily La Repubblica, while Italy’s leading daily, Corriere della Sera, writes “The Greek NO scares Europe”.

In covering the resignation of the Greek finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis, Italian media have honed in on his fashion choice. Varoufakis appeared at a press conference in a grey t-shirt on Sunday night, before today announcing his decision to quit. Italians themselves are still getting used to the casual clothing choices of their own prime minister, Matteo Renzi, who often makes public appearances in jeans.

Corriere Della Sera
Corriere Della Sera Photograph: Corriera Della Sera
La Repubblica
La Repubblica Photograph: La Republbica

Bond yields rise after referendum result

Yields on government bonds in Spain, Italy and Portugal are moving higher after the no vote, not surprising given the implications of Greece moving closer to a eurozone exit on these countries:

Updated

European Central Bank to meet on Greece

One of the key decisions of the day will be made by the European Central Bank when it looks at whether to continue providing liquidity to Greek banks. If not, they will struggle to reopen on Tuesday, as Greek politicians (notably the now departed Yanis Varoufakis) had promised. Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets UK, said:

The ball now lies firmly in the ECB’s court as the prospect of Greek banks running out of money in the coming hours is likely to increase, with the prospect that the ECB will cut off Greek banks in the process causing a collapse of the Greek banking system, and in the process highlighting the significant structural flaws of the euro.

In a proper monetary union it would be inconceivable for the US to cut off Florida or for the UK government to cut off Scotland from their lender of last resort, but if the ECB ends ELA then that is precisely what will happen to Greece, either later today, or later this week.

Updated

The surprise resignation of Yanis Varoufakis comes ahead of a meeting tomorrow between eurozone leaders to discuss their next steps following the no victory in the referendum.

That could of course make things easier for Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras in any discussions with his peers. Varoufakis himself said as much: “I was made aware of a certain preference by some Eurogroup participants, and assorted ‘partners’, for my … ‘absence’ from its meetings.” Over the weekend he had accused Greece’s European creditors of “terrorism.”

And in keeping with his tenure as finance minister he ended with a jibe at his tormentors: “I shall wear the creditors’ loathing with pride.”

His departure was not the first in the wake of the vote – yesterday Antonis Samaras, the head of the opposition rightwing New Democracy party who campaigned for the yes side, stepped down.

But the decision by the motorcycle-riding, game-playing Varoufakis has far more significance, as shown by the fact the euro recovered some of its lost ground in the wake of the announcement:

Euro July 5
Euro July 5 Photograph: Reuters/Reuters

Updated

Here’s an early call on how European markets are expected to open, courtesy IG:

Summary

I’m handing over our continuing coverage of events in Greece and across Europe to my colleague Nick Fletcher. Here’s a short summary of how events stand at the moment:

  • The Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis has resigned, despite a no vote in the referendum. In a blog post on his website Varoufakis flagged that his decision was prompted in part by “some European participants” expressing a desire for his role to end in any further negotiations.
  • Alexis Tsipras has called for a key political meeting to take place in Greece on Monday morning at 10:00am to discuss the outcome of the referendum.
  • Greeks voted overwhelmingly for a no vote in the referendum, with over 61% casting a no vote in the groundbreaking political decision.

Here’s our report on the dramatic referendum result:

European leaders were scrambling for a response on Monday after a resounding no from Greek voters in a momentous referendum on austerity which could send the country crashing out of the eurozone.

With Europe’s financial markets set to follow Asia’s overnight lead by going sharply into the red, German chancellor Angela Merkel was to meet with French leader François Hollande in Paris after Greece overwhelmingly rejected international creditors’ tough bailout terms.

The pair spoke by telephone late Sunday, declaring the referendum decision must “be respected” and calling for an emergency eurozone summit which European Union president Donald Tusk said would be held on Tuesday.

A flurry of other meetings will also be held Monday as European leaders sized up the implications of the vote, a victory for Greece’s radical prime minister Alexis Tsipras, who insisted it did not mean a “rupture” with Europe.

Here’s the full story:

Updated

Here’s the very immediate response from some of the financial markets.

A short time before the post announcing his resignation, Varoufakis posted a much more jubilant note about the referendum decision:

On the 25th of January, dignity was restored to the people of Greece.

In the five months that intervened since then, we became the first government that dared raise its voice, speaking on behalf of the people, saying no to the damaging irrationality of our extend-and-pretend ‘Bailout Program’.

We

    • spread the word that the Greek ‘bailouts’ were exercises whose purpose was intentionally to transfer private losses onto the shoulders of the weakest Greeks, before being transferred to other European taxpayers
    • articulated, for the first time in the Eurogroup, an economic argument to which there was no credible response
    • put forward moderate, technically feasible proposals that would remove the need for further ‘bailouts’
    • confined the troika to its Brussels’ lair
    • internationalised Greece’s humanitarian crisis and its roots in intentionally recessionary policies
    • spread hope beyond Greece’s borders that democracy can breathe within a monetary union hitherto dominated by fear.

Ending interminable, self-defeating, austerity and restructuring Greece’s public debt were our two targets. But these two were also our creditors’ targets. From the moment our election seemed likely, last December, the powers-that-be started a bank run and planned, eventually, to shut Greece’s banks down. Their purpose?

Updated

Here’s our latest report on Varoufakis’ resignation. More details to be added shortly:

The Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis has resigned in the wake of the country’s resounding no vote rejecting the eurozone’s austerity terms.

Writing on his blog on Monday morning he said that he would be standing down immediately after pressure from Greece’s European partners.

“Soon after the announcement of the referendum results, I was made aware of a certain preference by some Eurogroup participants, and assorted ‘partners’, for my … ‘absence’ from its meetings,” he wrote.

The prime minister Alexis Tsipras judged this to be “potentially helpful to him in reaching an agreement. For this reason I am leaving the ministry of finance today”.

He added: “The referendum of 5 July will stay in history as a unique moment when a small European nation rose up against debt-bondage.

“Like all struggles for democratic rights, so too this historic rejection of the Eurogroup’s 25 June ultimatum comes with a large price tag attached. It is, therefore, essential that the great capital bestowed upon our government by the splendid NO vote be invested immediately into a YES to a proper resolution – to an agreement that involves debt restructuring, less austerity, redistribution in favour of the needy, and real reforms.

Updated

Varoufakis’ presence in further negotiations was always going to be difficult after his public rhetoric about the role of European leaders.

In one interview published on Saturday, he accused the country’s creditors of terrorism:

“What they’re doing with Greece has a name: terrorism,” Varoufakis told Spain’s El Mundo. “What Brussels and the troika want today is for the yes [vote] to win so they could humiliate the Greeks. Why did they force us to close the banks? To instil fear in people. And spreading fear is called terrorism.”

On Sunday night he promised to resign in the event a yes vote was recorded. Despite the outcome of a no vote, he has still followed through on that decision to resign.

Updated

"Minister no more": Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis resigns

In another extraordinary development the Greek finance minister has just announced his resignation.

In a move likely to spark further concerns about the role of other European leaders in Greece’s internal politics, Varoufakis said he was made aware of a preference by “some European participants” of his absence throughout the continuing negotiations.

The post was made on Varoufakis’ blog and there is nothing to suggest it is not authentic. It has also been cross-posted on his Twitter account.

Here’s the post in full:

The referendum of 5th July will stay in history as a unique moment when a small European nation rose up against debt-bondage.

Like all struggles for democratic rights, so too this historic rejection of the Eurogroup’s 25th June ultimatum comes with a large price tag attached. It is, therefore, essential that the great capital bestowed upon our government by the splendid NO vote be invested immediately into a YES to a proper resolution – to an agreement that involves debt restructuring, less austerity, redistribution in favour of the needy, and real reforms.

Soon after the announcement of the referendum results, I was made aware of a certain preference by some Eurogroup participants, and assorted ‘partners’, for my… ‘absence’ from its meetings; an idea that the Prime Minister judged to be potentially helpful to him in reaching an agreement. For this reason I am leaving the Ministry of Finance today.

I consider it my duty to help Alexis Tsipras exploit, as he sees fit, the capital that the Greek people granted us through yesterday’s referendum.

And I shall wear the creditors’ loathing with pride.

We of the Left know how to act collectively with no care for the privileges of office. I shall support fully Prime Minister Tsipras, the new Minister of Finance, and our government.

The superhuman effort to honour the brave people of Greece, and the famous OXI (NO) that they granted to democrats the world over, is just beginning.

Peter Kazimir, the Slovakian finance minister, has also made some rather colourful observations of the current situation overnight:

The UK government is also prepared to do whatever necessary to protect the country from the impact of a possible exit from the Eurozone for Greece. This from AFP is the latest update:

Britain will do “whatever is necessary to protect its economic security”, a government spokesman said Monday after Greeks voted overwhelmingly against austerity in a referendum that could send them crashing out of the eurozone with unknown consequences.

“This is a critical moment in the economic crisis in Greece,” a Downing Street spokesman said. “We will continue to do whatever is necessary to protect our economic security at this uncertain time. We have already got contingency plans in place and later this morning the Prime Minister will chair a further meeting to review those plans in light of yesterday’s result.”

The front pages of newspapers across Europe are a combination of fear, hope and (on occasion) somewhat comical absurdity.

Here’s a short sample of a few of them, starting off with a rather extraordinary one from Efsyn featuring Dutch politician Jeroen Dijsselbloem:

Here’s the Guardian’s view on the current impasse now facing Europe following the Greek referendum:

Kicking the can down the road has been the cliche of choice over a slow euro crisis that has steadily strangled the life out of the Greek economy. But at some point Europe was bound to run out of road. That happened on Sunday night, when it emerged that the Greek people had said no to continuing to engage with their creditors on the same suffocating terms.

Just over a week ago, Alexis Tsipras staked his future on forcing this denouement. The eight days that followed his midnight declaration of a plebiscite, to accept or reject the creditors’ terms for the latest slug of overdraft, have witnessed many extraordinary things. The Greek parliament licensed a hasty referendum on a question that had already been overtaken by events. A ballot paper written in jargon posed a ludicrously technical question, opening up a void for emotion to fill. Mixing talk of “terror” from their partners with haze about what would happen after a no, Mr Tsipras and his finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis, aimed squarely for the heart rather than the head. Meanwhile, Greeks faced the fiercest financial controls ever seen in modern Europe: bank doors were shut, supplies disrupted, and citizens queued at every cashpoint for their ration of notes. In countries such as Germany, where history engenders suspicion of referendums, it may have looked like a paradigm case of how not to do democracy.

As the sun begins to rise now in Greece on “the morning after” Syntagma Square appears empty. That may well change as another highly politically charged day is set to get underway across Europe

John Cassidy in the New Yorker has outlined some useful analysis on the implications of the no vote:

Whether they will be offered one within the eurozone remains to be seen. Although the result was a great political triumph for Tsipras and Syriza, it doesn’t automatically translate into a victory in the showdown with the European Union and the International Monetary Fund. Greece is still broke, and its banks are still closed. If the Europeans want to force the Greeks out of their currency club, they have the means to do it at any moment. All they have to do is turn off the credit that the European Central Bank has been providing to Greece’s banks. Indeed, the ECB’s governing council will decide on Monday what to do next.

With Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, and François Hollande, the French president, due to meet in Paris on Monday afternoon, and an emergency summit of all European Union leaders scheduled for Tuesday, it seems highly unlikely that the ECB. will render these deliberations pointless by immediately torpedoing the Greek financial system. In all likelihood, there will be at least one more round of talks between the two sides, and, quite possibly, more than one. Greece’s next big payment to its creditors isn’t due until 23 July, which is more than two weeks away. If the country’s banks can somehow be propped up until then, there is time for more deliberation.

Updated

We’ve written a lot about the market reaction to events in Europe, but the political fallout in Greece is still likely to unfold rapidly over the next few days.

Prime minister Alexis Tsipras is convening a meeting of key political leaders at 10am on Monday in Athens, according to Enikos. Overnight the Greek opposition leader Antonis Samaras resigned following the referendum decision.

How Tsipras proceeds throughout this week will continue to shape how events unfold across Europe.

China’s response to the Greek referendum and the market uncertainty has been to engage in a series of complex manoeuvres aimed at stimulating the market.

It’s not yet clear how successful the measures – which involve a variety of investments and buyouts aided by the central bank – will be in preventing setbacks for their markets.

Reuters have a good take on the different measures that have been employed here:

Chinese stocks jumped on Monday after Beijing unleashed an unprecedented series of support measures over the weekend to stave off the prospect of a full-blown crash that was threatening to destabilize the world’s second-biggest economy.

In an extraordinary weekend of policy moves, brokerages and fund managers vowed to buy massive amounts of stocks, helped by China’s state-backed margin finance company, which in turn would be aided by a direct line of liquidity from the central bank.

Investors, who had ignored official measures to prop up the market as equity indexes slid around 12% last week, finally reacted, with the CSI300 index .CSI300 of the largest listed companies in Shanghai and Shenzhen jumping 4%, while the Shanghai Composite Index .SSEC gained 3 percent. [.SS]

Blue chips, the explicit target of the stabilization fund, outperformed stocks on the small-cap ChiNext indexes.

The rapid decline of China’s previously booming stock market, which by the end of last week had fallen around 30 percent from a mid-June peak, had become a major headache for President Xi Jinping and China’s top leaders, who were already struggling to avert a sharper economic slowdown.

In response, China has orchestrated a halt to new share issues, with dozens of firms scrapping their IPO plans in separate but similarly worded statements over the weekend, in a tactic authorities have used before to support markets.

Updated

My colleague Justin McCurry has filed a more comprehensive take on the Asian market reaction to the Greek referendum, which largely recorded falls across the board but with limited losses.

China is the exception – it saw a boost on open this morning – but that is attributed to the enormous and unprecedented government measures implemented over the weekend to try and stop a market crash.

This from Justin:

Analysts said that regional market panic was unlikely, even after Athens appeared to take a step closer to a “Grexit” by roundly rejecting the bailout terms set by its international creditors But they added that negotiations this week would be critical.

“The Greece ‘no’ vote is a surprise,” Shoji Hirakawa, chief equity strategist at Okasan Securities, told Bloomberg News. “But the key is that the direction is going toward more talks after this.”

Other analysts said markets had not expected Greek voters to reject the terms of the bailout so emphatically – a move that could see further losses on Monday and trigger an investor rush to US Treasuries or other government bonds that are seen as largely immune to market turbulence.

In one of the day’s more colourful commentaries, analysts at Japan’s Mizuho Bank said the Sunday’s “Greferendum” had turned out to be a “Grief-erendum”.

On what most had expected to be a tricky day for markets around the world, dealers stressed that uncertainty over Greece’s future had not rocked markets as badly as some might have expected.

Read his report in full here.

Updated

“The fightback for a Europe of dignity starts here.”

Another short documentary from John Domokos and Phoebe Greenwood.

As Syriza supporters flock to Athens’ Syntagma square to celebrate, Phoebe Greenwood talks to those who are celebrating a historic referendum outcome. ‘They thought they could intimidate us,’ one man says. Despite jitters on the financial markets, others happy with the historic oxi (no) vote say they hope it will be the moment that Greeks can come together.

Crisis will be "appropriately resolved" China minister says

Deputy Chinese foreign minister Cheng Guoping believes the Greek crisis will be “appropriately resolved” and the economy will turn around, Reuters reports.

However he would not say if Alexis Tsipras could attend an emerging powers summit later in the week in Russia.

“I believe that with the hard efforts of all sides, Greece’s economic situation will turn around. The economic crisis will be appropriately handled,” he told reporters, in China’s first official comment since the Greek vote.

“Whether or not it can be appropriately handled will not only have an important impact on Greece and its people, but will have an important impact on … the world too.”

Asked whether Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras might come to this week’s summit of the BRICS group of five major emerging nations – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – Cheng said that as Russia was the host it was its decision on whether to invite other countries.

Russia’s finance minister said last week that Russia had not offered Greece the chance to become a member of the New Development Bank that is being created by the BRICS group.

Updated

Result is very regrettable – Eurogroup president

Jeroen Dijsselbloem, Dutch finance minister and president of the Eurogroup, has released a statement on the referendum results.

It is a short statement, but needless to say, Dijsselbloem is disappointed.

I take note of the outcome of the Greek referendum. This result is very regrettable for the future of Greece. For recovery of the Greek economy, difficult measures and reforms are inevitable. We will now wait for the initiatives of the Greek authorities. The Eurogroup will discuss the state of play on Tuesday 7 July.

Argentinian president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, who is never shy of enthusiastically tweeting her opinions, has welcomed the referendum results.

In a series of tweets written in English, Fernández labeled the No vote an “outright victory of democracy and dignity.”

The Greek people have said NO to the impossible and humiliating conditions imposed upon them for the restructuring of their foreign debt. We Argentines understand what this is about. We hope Europe and its leaders understand the message of the polls. Nobody can be asked to sign their own death certificate. The words of President Kirchner still resound at the UN General Assembly in 2003 he said: “The dead do not pay their debts.”

Some background on the link between Argentina and Greece in this current crisis, from Reuters:

There are stark similarities between Argentina’s 2002 financial meltdown and the turmoil in Greece: rigid monetary regimes, creditors battling domestic politics to fix the problem and banking systems at breaking point.

The South American grains behemoth defaulted on $100 billion in bonds in a 2002 crisis that thrust millions of middle-class Argentines into poverty. By the next year, helped by a massive soy crop, Argentina started growing again.

But the 2002 crisis continues to plague its finances.

Fernandez regularly blasts bondholders who have sued the country over the debt it failed to pay 13 years ago.

Most holders agreed to restructurings that paid about 30 cents on the dollar, while a group of hedge funds sued for full repayment.

The country defaulted again last year when a U.S. judge barred it from honouring its restructured debt without reaching a deal with the funds, which Fernandez denounces as “vultures.”

Argentina became one of the world’s fastest expanding economies after its default, growing at an averaging above 8.5 percent between 2003 and 2007, when Fernandez was first elected.

Since then she has ordered trade and currency controls that have slowed investment while government fiscal accounts deteriorate due to high state spending.

Updated

Greek finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis, has claimed the successful No campaign is a “majestic, big YES to a democratic, rational Europe.”

Varoufakis accuses Greece’s creditors of attempting to “humiliate” the leftwing government by forcing stringent austerity, and dragging them into an agreement which “offers no firm commitment to a sensible, well-defined debt restructure.”

He further writes:

Today’s referendum delivered a resounding call for a mutually beneficial agreement between Greece and our European partners. We shall respond to the Greek voters’ call with a positive approach to:

  • The IMF, which only recently released a helpful report confirming that Greek public debt was unsustainable
  • The ECB, the Governing Council of which, over the past week, refused to countenance some of the more aggressive voices within
  • The European Commission, whose leadership kept throwing bridges over the chasm separating Greece from some of our partners.

Updated

‘We’re going to hit the iceberg’

A great short film here from John Domokos.

From the Syriza faithful to the run-down docks of Piraeus and the middle-class district of Faliro, Greeks spent the day of the referendum locked in debate, suspense and catharsis.

For some it was a day they sent a message to Europe that they will ‘not be intimidated’. But many Greeks fear trouble lies ahead. As one voter said, both a yes and no outcome would result in calamity: ‘We’re three metres from the iceberg and we’re here to be asked if we’re going to go right or left.’ Either way, he said, ‘we’re going to hit the iceberg’.

Updated

Shanghai stocks have jumped almost 8%. The government boosts AFP refers to are emergency measures taken to prevent a possible stock market crash in the world’s second-largest economy. It’s not directly related to Greece, but could still have an effect on world markets.

From Reuters: In an extraordinary weekend of policy moves, brokerages and fund managers vowed to buy massive amounts of stocks, helped by China’s state-backed margin finance company which in turn would be aided by a direct line of liquidity from the central bank.

China has also orchestrated a halt to new share issues, with dozens of firms scrapping their IPO plans in separate but similarly worded statements over the weekend, in a tactic authorities have used before to support markets.

Europe dodged a bullet with the No result, and its supporters should be breathing a sigh of relief, Paul Krugman writes for the New York Times.

Krugman’s colourful take on the events of the last day is well worth a read, but here is a snippet. He continues:

Of course, that’s not the way the creditors would have you see it. Their story, echoed by many in the business press, is that the failure of their attempt to bully Greece into acquiescence was a triumph of irrationality and irresponsibility over sound technocratic advice.

But the campaign of bullying — the attempt to terrify Greeks by cutting off bank financing and threatening general chaos, all with the almost open goal of pushing the current leftist government out of office — was a shameful moment in a Europe that claims to believe in democratic principles. It would have set a terrible precedent if that campaign had succeeded, even if the creditors were making sense.

What’s more, they weren’t. The truth is that Europe’s self-styled technocrats are like medieval doctors who insisted on bleeding their patients — and when their treatment made the patients sicker, demanded even more bleeding.

Ouch.

Updated

As we continue our watch of the Asian/Pacific markets, the Malaysian ringgit has been given the unenviable title of “worst currency” this morning, according to the FT.

Japan’s Nikkei stock index has mounted a slight recovery after dropping 1.5% in early trading Monday, as Asian markets were jolted by the uncertainty created by Greece’s “no” vote in Sunday’s austerity referendum.

The Nikkei 225 was trading down 1.4% at 20256.69, having earlier fallen 339.64 points to 20,200.15, a day after Greece voted to rejected the eurozone’s terms for the country remaining in the single currency.

South Korea’s Kospi was down 0.9% at 2,085.67.

Nils Pratley, the Guardian’s financial editor, says the current crisis has pushed the financial world back to the wild markets of the 2008 financial crisis.

You can read Nils’ analysis in full here, but below is a snippet on bond markets, which he says will take centre stage.

That is where Grexit worries will be keenest. If Greece could be on the way out of the single currency, will investors be less willing to hold the debt of other eurozone states carrying heavy debt loads? The sovereign debt of Spain, Italy, Portugal and Ireland will be closely watched for knock-on effects. Will there be contagion?

All eyes will turn to the European Central Bank. First, to see if it cuts off support for Greek banks. Second, to learn if it is prepared to intervene to protect the bonds of other eurozone stragglers. Last Sunday, when Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras called the referendum, the ECB and the eurogroup ministers pledged to react, if needed, to avoid a dangerous fall-out in debt markets.

Pratley also makes an interesting point that while the euro will “almost certainly fall in value initially” there is another school of though which says “the single currency would be strengthened in the long run by the departure of its weakest member.”

The Australian stock exchange fell sharply on Monday’s open, not long after the final vote was counted (not that 100% was needed to see the overwhelming response). Below is a graph from the ASX website.

The Australian stock market fell sharply on open on Monday 6 July, following Greece's rejection of bailout terms by creditors.
The Australian stock market fell sharply on open on Monday 6 July, following Greece’s rejection of bailout terms by creditors. Photograph: ASX

The Australian dollar dipped to a six-year low of US$0.7484 in early trading but has recovered to 0.7509.

The euro, not surprisingly, was down 0.8% at $1.1015 but off an early low of $1.0967. It had initially dropped around 1.5% against the yen – which is seen as a safe haven.

The US dollar also recouped its early drop to be only a touch softer at 122.48 yen.

Updated

In a delightfully headlined post, the Financial Times says early moves don’t suggest a panic in the Asian markets. It also notes:

“The hope for Alexis Tsipras, prime minister, is that the vote galvanises support for his anti-austerity agenda and forces Athens’ creditors to make concessions.

But it’s questionable whether banks will re-open on Tuesday (after a holiday today), as planned. If they don’t, the “no” vote could fast-track a Grexit and see Greece revive its only currency.”

Read more from ‘Fast Asia Open: Oxi oxi oxi, oi oi oi’ here.

Summary

While we await further market news, let’s have a look back at the extraordinary last few hours. My colleague Graeme Wearden, and before him Julia Kollewe, drove live coverage of the vote count and reaction in the streets of Greece and around the world.

You can relive the night blow by blow here, or Graeme’s summary is below.

Greece has delivered a resounding No to its creditors, in a move that has stunned the eurozone tonight and may shake the financial markets.

In the last few minutes, the last ballot papers were counted. And No campaign has exceeded all expectations by securing 61.31% of the vote [here’s the official count].

As our interactive shows, every area of Greece has voted to reject the proposals of Greece’s creditors and seek a better deal.

Prime minister Alexis Tsipras has declared that it’s a historic day for Greece, which shows that democracy cannot be blackmailed.

In a TV address, Tsipras has also vowed to begin negotiations with creditors to reach a sustainable deal to tackle Greece’s debt crisis.

“You made a very brave choice.

“The mandate you gave me is not the mandate of a rupture with Europe, but a mandate to strengthen our negotiating position to seek a viable solution.”

“No” supporte”No” supporters wave Greek national flags during celebrations in Athens, Greece<br />“No” supporters wave Greek national flags during celebrations in Athens, Greece July 5, 2015. Greeks overwhelmingly rejected conditions of a rescue package from creditors on Sunday, throwing the future of the country’s euro zone membership into further doubt and deepening a standoff with lenders. REUTERS/Dimitris Michalakis” width=”1000″ height=”600″ class=”gu-image” /><br />
<figcaption> <span class=“No” supporte”No” supporters wave Greek national flags during celebrations in Athens, Greece
“No” supporters wave Greek national flags during celebrations in Athens, Greece July 5, 2015. Greeks overwhelmingly rejected conditions of a rescue package from creditors on Sunday, throwing the future of the country’s euro zone membership into further doubt and deepening a standoff with lenders. REUTERS/Dimitris Michalakis Photograph: STRINGER/Reuters

Greece’s future in the eurozone looks more perilous than ever, and the next 48 hours could be critical.

German chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Francois Hollande will meet in Paris on Monday night.

Then on Tuesday, eurozone leaders will debate the crisis at an emergency summit. Eurozone finance ministers will hold a Eurogroup meeting that afternoon.

Eurogroup president Jeroen Dijssebloem has already criticised the result of the referendum, warning:

“I take note of the outcome of the Greek referendum. This result is very regrettable for the future of Greece.”

But democratic senator Bernie Sanders has hailed the result as a decisive vote against austerity.

A series of financial analysts have warned tonight that Greece is likely to exit the eurozone. As Barclays warned:

“While Chancellor Merkel and President Hollande are scheduled to meet tomorrow, we argue that EMU exit now is the most likely scenario….”

Finance minister Yanis Varoufakis, though, has denied this is an option:

Updated

Japan, S Korea, Australia markets open down

  • Japan Nikkei index down 1.46% to 20239.0
  • Australia’s ASX 200 is down 1.57% to 5451.4
  • South Korea’s Kospi index is down 1.23% at 2078.47

Futures trading

  • UK FTSE 6431.4 (-1.84%)
  • US S&P 500 2044.15 (-1.11%)
  • German DAX 10808.5 (-2.78%)

The Guardian’s Tokyo correspondent, Justin McCurry, has just filed the below update on Japan’s market today.

Japan’s Nikkei stock index opened down more than 300 points on Monday, a day after Greece voted to rejected the eurozone’s terms for the country remaining in the single currency.

The Nikkei mounted a recovery last week after after posting its second-biggest daily drop this year after Greece and its international creditors failed to make a breakthrough in bailout talks.

Japan’s finance minister, Taro Aso, said last week he did not expect dramatic falls in Japanese share prices or a sudden surge in the yen if Greece defaulted but stayed in the eurozone.

He warned, however, that the impact on Japanese and other markets could be big if Athens left the single currency.

Mohamed El-Erian, the former boss of the world’s biggest bond trader Pimco and now chief economic adviser at insurance giant Allianz, said investors should brace for a major global equity selloff.

“Yes, you will see one. With the extent and duration a function of whether the ECB steps in with new anti-contagion measures,” he writes for Bloomberg.

“Without huge emergency assistance from the European Central Bank – a decision that faces long odds – the government will find it hard to get money to the country’s automated teller machines, let alone re-open the banks.”

Over to you Mario Draghi.

Updated

All votes counted – Greece votes no

All referendum votes have now been counted, with a final result of 61.31% voting no, to 38.69% yes.

Eyes are now moving towards the world markets, particularly those in Asia set to open in the next few hours. Tokyo and Korea will be first in the next few minutes and along with Shanghai and Hong Kong later today, are ones to watch.

Unsurprisingly the euro fell sharply in Asia, Reuters has already reported.

The Japanese government said it was ready to respond as needed in markets and was in close touch with other nations.

The euro was down 0.9 percent at $1.1012 but off an early low of $1.0967. It had initially dropped around 1.5 percent on the safe-haven yen only to find a big buy order waiting, which pared its losses to 134.53.

Likewise, the dollar recouped its early drop to be only a touch softer at 122.34 yen. The dollar index added 0.3 percent to 96.434.

Prime minister Alexis Tsipras has addressed the Greek nation, telling voters they made a “brave choice” and that “democracy can not be blackmailed.”

However he added: “I am fully aware that the mandate here is not one to break with Europe by a mandate to strengthen our negotiating position to seek a viable solution.”

Greek voters have overwhelmingly rejected the extra austerity measures demanded by creditors in return for bailout funds. In a referendum held with just eight days notice, more than 60% have voted no, or oxi.

No supporters have taken to the streets in celebration, while Antonis Samaras, the head of the New Democracy party who campaigned for a Yes vote, has resigned.

Shocked EU finance ministers have called an emergency meeting for Tuesday, as analysts fear collapse of the Greek banking system.

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Senate leaders join struggle to find passable bill. Stock markets only mildly perturbed. “Reneging on its debt obligations would make the U.S. the first major Western government to default since Nazi Germany 80 years ago,” Bloomberg reports…

 


Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “US shutdown: Congress reconvenes after weekend of choppy talks – live” was written by Tom McCarthyin New York, for theguardian.com on Monday 14th October 2013 15.31 UTC

Texas Senator Ted Cruz, whose quixotic campaign to “defund” Obamacare was the stick in the spokes that got us here, could – could – cause a default all by himself, Joshua Green reports in Bloomberg BusinessWeek:

How could this happen? Because the Senate can move quickly when necessary–but only by unanimous consent. Let’s say Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell strike a deal today (that’s looking unlikely). Cruz surely won’t like it and has said repeatedly, “I will do everything necessary and anything possible to defund Obamacare.” If he’s true to his word, he could drag out the proceedings past Thursday and possibly well beyond. “If a determined band of nut jobs wants to take down the global economy, they could do it,” says Jim Manley, a former top staffer for Reid. “Under Senate rules, we are past the point of no return–there’s not anything Reid or McConnell could do about it.”

Read the full piece here. There’s no indication that Cruz is that crazy?

“Reneging on its debt obligations would make the U.S. the first major Western government to default since Nazi Germany 80 years ago,” Bloomberg reports.

Updated

Congress won’t act until markets panic, they say. Comforted by the implication that Congress can and will act, markets don’t panic. But Congress won’t act until markets panic. Comforted by…

Anatomy of a deal

How might an eventual deal look? What are the sticking points?

Congress must decide how long to extend the debt limit and how long to fund the government for. Legislators must also decide the level at which to fund government – whether or not to retain the deep “sequester” cuts that took effect on March 1, and for how long.

Republicans would like a shorter debt limit extension in order to maintain leverage in budget negotiations. Democrats would like a shorter-term funding bill in order to accelerate the end of the sequester, which chunked $85bn off the budget between March and October.

At the end of September, Senate Democrats passed conciliatory legislation that would have funded the government at sequestration levels through November – but the bill was rejected by House Republicans. Token Conservative New York Times columnist Ross Douthat retold the history in a recommended Twitter lecture on Sunday:

But now the “original” potential deal to keep government open over the short term at sequester levels is gone, and everything seems back in play. The distance between the two sides on the debt limit extension and the term of the spending bill is a matter of months, NBC’s John Harwood reports:

The Washington Post’s Greg Sargent sees a possible deal by which Democrats would demand the destruction of the debt ceiling as a counterweight to Republican demands on spending:

So here’s what Dems should do. If Republicans refuse to budge off their insistence on lower spending levels, Dems should call their bluff by demanding a permanent disabling of the debt limit as an extortion tool as part of any short-term compromise. (Yes, Republicans will say No. But bear with me.)

If, somehow, a deal is reached this week in the Senate that involves Republicans giving ground on spending levels, Dems should make the push for a permanent disabling of the debt limit a key goal in the next round of formal, long term negotiations.

In the short term, if Dems accept sequester level spending into early next year in exchange for permanent disabling of the debt limit, it would not be an awful outcome.

Read the full piece here.

Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia, a centrist Democrat, offered a relatively optimistic view of the negotiations this morning on CNN. Talking Points Memo caught the spot:

“I think we’re 70-80% there, putting the extra 20-25% to it,” Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) said Monday on CNN.” “When should the (continuing resolution) come due, when should the debt ceiling come due, and does that give that time for the budget conference, the budget committees to sit down and work through this? Those are the details that have to be worked out.”

Updated

Leaders of the World Bank and IMF warned at a meeting in Washington DC Sunday of the disastrous consequences of a US default, the New York Times reports. Some damage has already been done, as borrowing costs for the United States – over the short term, at least – are creeping up.

Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, warned of “massive disruption the world over” if the United States plunges into default. At the start of the month she said it is “‘mission-critical’ that [the US default risk] be resolved as soon as possible.”

From the Times report on the Washington meeting:

Participants at the meetings remained on edge, given the gravity of the threat. Ms. Lagarde said “that lack of certainty, that lack of trust in the U.S. signature” would disrupt the world economy.

Wolfgang Schäuble, the German finance minister, issued his own urgent appeal. “The fiscal standoff has to be resolved without delay,” he said in a statement released by the I.M.F.

Read the full piece here.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average opens the day down just a bit, about a half-percent. The bets are still on, for now.

President Obama spoke yesterday with House minority leader Nancy Pelosi, and the two party leaders in the Senate – Democrat Harry Reid and Republican Mitch McConnell – have been holding talks through the weekend that were expected to resume this morning.

Talks between the president and the House Republican leadership – so hopeful as of Friday evening – foundered on Saturday. “No deal” Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan told reporters at the Capitol.

The needle they’re collectively trying to thread is legislation raising the debt ceiling that would be acceptable to both Senate Democrats and House Republicans. The current legislation thought to be under discussion would also provide for reopening government and settle a budget through the New Year.

If a catchall deal proves unworkable, Congress may have to pass the debt limit bill separately. However it may actually be easier to pass a catchall deal, because there are more variables and thus more room for negotiation – and compromise.

Guardian Washington correspondent Dan Roberts (@RobertsDan) is tracking the action:

Democrat majority leader, Harry Reid, appeared briefly in the Senate to say he had a “productive and substantive” discussion with Republican Mitch McConnell and was optimistic about a deal, but suspended public proceedings until 2pm on Monday while his backroom talks continued.

The only outward sign of movement from the White House came in a Sunday afternoon phone call with House minority leader Nancy Pelosi, in which President Obama reiterated his insistence on Republicans agreeing to end a government shutdown and extend the debt ceiling before he would negotiate any budget concessions.

Read the full piece here.

Early Halloween.

Good morning and welcome to our live blog coverage of yet another moment of truth in Washington. If the nation’s legislators can’t cut a deal soon – they have a day or two; just exactly how long is a matter for debate – then we get to find out if Warren Buffett was just being a hysterical ninny when he compared default to “a nuclear bomb”.

Negotiations through the weekend failed to produce a deal, or clear a pathway to a deal. Since Friday, talks between House Republican leaders and the White House have fallen apart, and talks between the party leaders in the Senate have sprung up. The House is scheduled to convene today at noon, the Senate shortly thereafter.

The top priority for Congress is to pass legislation that would raise the debt limit sufficiently to fund the Treasury’s accounts payable. They also need to pass a bill to reopen the federal government, which has been partially shuttered for 14 days now (it closed on 1 October). In the current environment, having the government closed is only Code Orange. The debt limit is the Code Red bit.

Investors are holding their breaths to see what the stock market will think of the weekend’s dithering. Knowledgable analysts have suggested that a stock market crash may be the most likely spur to get Congress to actually act. The bond market is closed Monday for the Columbus Day holiday, but stocks are open. The Dow still was relatively unbothered by the crisis on Friday.

The Treasury has said the “extraordinary measures” it has taken since May to cover expenses will be exhausted Thursday, at which point the government will be operating on about $30bn cash on hand and a prayer, with neither expected to last long

Updated

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Meetings intensify as shutdown enters 11th day. Public blames unpopular Republicans, poll shows. Negotiations thought to include larger budget issues. Senate majority leader Harry Reid proposed to vote on a bill to extend the debt ceiling until the end of 2014…

 


Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Senate Republicans meet with President Obama for shutdown talks – live” was written by Tom McCarthy, for theguardian.com on Friday 11th October 2013 16.00 UTC

No votes are scheduled in the House today. But it’s open. They could ramp up any time.

In the Senate, majority leader Harry Reid moved Thursday evening to vote on a bill to extend the debt ceiling until the end of 2014. That legislation, or a version of it, could work its way into a broad agreement between the sides, although Republicans have rejected the idea of adding so much headroom.

The headroom, lest anyone needs reminding, is currently running out fast:

What’s a “spending cut”? 

Updated

The Republicans have arrived to the White House, CBS News reports.

Anatomy of a deal

The White House has said repeatedly that the president will not enter budget negotiations until Congress reopens the government. Those negotiations now appear to be happening.

The question is, if a deal emerges, will it require Republicans to pass the stopgap spending bill the Senate passed on 27 September with no add-ons pertaining to Obamacare or anything else – “clean,” as they say?

And what will the Republicans require in return for doing so? “We need to get something for the [continuing resolution] and something for the debt ceiling,” Rep. Raul Labrador of Idaho has explained.

One of the leaders of the negotiations on the Republican side is Paul Ryan, the former vice presidential candidate and reputed budget wonk. “Suddenly a man who seemed in danger of being eclipsed as the face of his party has re-emerged as essential to its rescue,” New York Times congressional reporter Jonathan Weisman writes. So what does Ryan want?

Ryan laid out areas for negotiation in a Wall Street Journal editorial Tuesday. They are Medicare (means-testing for relatively affluent recipients); federal pensions (cutting them) and taxes. He also alluded to the Keystone pipeline which would connect Canada “tar sands” oil deposits to the Gulf coast with dire environmental implications.

Ryan did not mention Obamacare, significantly, meaning a plan he brokers could encounter resistance from the hard-right House faction for whom destroying the law is a top priority. The health care law is partially paid for by a tax on medical devices. The deletion of the tax as part of a deal would allow the Tea Party to claim it had dealt the law a blow.

Democrats have been insisting all week that even a “clean” stopgap spending bill is not great for Democrats because it extrapolates from base spending levels that take into account the “meat-cleaver” sequester cuts. When sequestration becomes part of the new normal, there’s an argument to be made that the Republicans have won, no matter how bad their numbers are.

The chairman of the House appropriations committee said Republicans will test the president on his vow only to cut a budget deal on the condition that government reopens, Bloomberg Business week reports (via @robertcostaNRO):

Obama “would like the shutdown stopped,” Representative Hal Rogers, a Kentucky Republican, said after the White House session. “We are trying to find out what it is he would insist upon” in a spending measure to open the government.

What will they get?

Guardian Washington bureau chief Dan Roberts says Senator Ted Cruz, the grandstanding outspoken Tea Party standard-bearer, will be among Senate Republicans attending today’s meeting with the president.

Invited to horse-trade with the president. Not bad for someone who’s only held national elected office for 10 months.

Welcome to our live blog coverage of renewed activity on Capitol Hill to end the government shutdown and lift the debt ceiling. 

They seem serious this time. A meeting Thursday afternoon between House Republican leaders and the president produced late-night talks on what could be a broad deal. Big budget questions appeared to be on the table, in addition to the two emergencies. A pair of influential House Republicans, the chairmen of the appropriations and budget committees, said publicly that the talks had legs. The White House said the president “looks forward to making continued progress.”

Shelved was the Republican “offer” of Thursday morning to temporarily raise the debt limit. Gone was the notion that the Tea Party would redouble its fight to cripple Obamacare. House Republicans left a Friday breakfast talking about passing a stopgap spending bill to reopen the government, according to Robert Costa of the National Review. That step previously seemed beyond reach because of the strength of hard-right resistance.

Coincidentally, NBC News and the Wall Street Journal released one of their regular polls Thursday evening showing that the Republican party had, through the shutdown and default brinksmanship, achieved its worst rating in the history of the poll: 24% positive, 53% negative. The poll said the public blames Republicans more than the president for the shutdown by a margin of 53-31. The poll showed that Obamacare is rising in popularity.

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In May, the US treasury was able to employ some “extraordinary measures” to keep borrowing. These measures run out on 17 October. If the USS America goes down, little HMAS Australia will find it tough not to get sucked into the vortex…

 


Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Why Australia should fear a US government default” was written by Greg Jericho, for theguardian.com on Monday 7th October 2013 07.34 UTC

The current US government shutdown has little impact on Australia, but if the US hits the debt ceiling Australia will feel the consequences of a bitterly partisan US political system.

One of the more ironic aspects of the US government shutdown is that if it goes on for much longer, the government won’t be able to calculate its economic impact because it won’t be able to collect the data.

Last Friday was supposed to be the most recent release of US jobs figures, and yet those logging on to the BLS website would have seen this:

During the shutdown the BLS won’t be able to collect the data to calculate the employment figures. Similarly the Bureau of Economic Analysis is also shut down, which rather makes collating data for the GDP figures a tad tricky.

But for Australians the big issue is not so much the shutdown. Costly as it is to the American economy – wiping about 0.1% of GDP growth each week – it does not have a great direct impact outside its borders. After all there are not many Australians employed by the US government or about to go to a US national park this weekend. The real bitter pill for the rest of the world (and US) comes in a couple weeks when the US reaches its debt ceiling.

The debt ceiling is often lazily referred to as the US government’s credit card limit, but it is not about giving the US government the right to spend more, but the ability to borrow to pay off spending it has already undertaken.

The debt ceiling is currently at $US16.699tn, and was actually reached in May but the US treasury was able to employ some “extraordinary measures” to keep borrowing. These measures will run out on 17 October.

At that point the US will no longer be able to borrow money to pay its bills. In the short run that is OK, because the US government gets enough cash from tax revenue to cover its expenses. But on 1 November it gets a bill for US$67bn for social security, medicare and veterans benefits. By 15 November the US government will be short about US$108bn. And that means defaulting on its payments.

No one really knows what will happen if the debt ceiling is not raised. Views range from, it’ll be fine, to it’ll be Armageddon. The US Treasury for its part has put out a paper that paints a pretty scary picture.

After looking at what has occurred in 2011 when the US nearly reached the debt limit, it concluded that a debt default “could have a catastrophic effect on not just financial markets but also on job creation, consumer spending and economic growth”.

It also noted that “many private-sector analysts believing that it would lead to events of the magnitude of late 2008 or worse, and the result then was a recession more severe than any seen since the Great Depression”.

And just in case you are a glass-half-full kind of person and you still have some optimism, the report ends on this less than upbeat note: “Considering the experience of countries around that world that have defaulted on their debt… [the] consequences, including high interest rates, reduced investment, higher debt payments, and slow economic growth, could last for more than a generation.”

Cheery.

Thus far the markets have been rather sanguine. The US Treasury 10-year bond yields are lower now than they were a month ago – suggesting investors are not too spooked about the long-term US economy. There is also a sense that investors are a bit jaded – the debt ceiling fight is now becoming an annual event.

But in the past few days, investors have become very worried about holding US treasury bonds which mature in the next month.

The spread of the six-month to one-month treasury bonds fell off a cliff, to the point where investors are now demanding a higher return for buying a one-month US treasury bond than for a six-month.

Should the default actually occur you could expect those jaded investors would suddenly get very alert. A US government default would put the world economy into uncharted waters. Around 87 % of all foreign exchange transactions involve US dollars. If the US government can no longer guarantee it will pay its bills (even for a short time), that rather upsets the integrity of the entire system.

In 2011 when the debt ceiling was almost breached, the US’s credit rating was downgraded to AA. It hurt US confidence, put a big hand brake on economic growth, and the turmoil on financial markets reduced American household wealth by around US$2.4tn.

For Australia, in 2011 our dollar at the time soared to US$1.10 as the American currency lost value. With the value of our dollar already rising the last thing our manufacturing sector needs is for the dollar to be given a boost.

For the moment most expect congress to back down and raise the debt ceiling (or perhaps even suspend it for a few more months like they did last year).

But Australians should hope that the US gets its act in order soon. While it is nice to think that we are now bound to China, a look over the past 20 years shows that aside from extraordinary circumstances – such as the dotcom bubble and September 11 attack, and our mining boom in 2006 – Australia and the US’s GDP growth is quite closely linked.

Our economy is like a dinghy in the ocean of the international economy. If the US scuttles itself though political intransigence, without another mining boom, little HMAS Australia would find it tough not to get sucked into the vortex as USS America goes down.

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