EUR Rises After ECB Meeting Regardless of Lack of Hawkishness

July 20, 2017 (Tempus, Inc.) – The U.S. Dollar is trading in wild ranges this morning as markets react to the European Central Bank’s decision to delay any monetary policy tightening. Shockingly, the Euro is up as ECB President Mario Draghi is explaining that QE will not be changed and that officials are still committed to expanding and extending the program as needed, yet none of this is having a negative effect.

In fact, he admits that inflation is dragging, but feels very confident on the strength of the economic recovery. Basically, it looks like Draghi and other members felt the fall will provide all the necessary data and analysis that provide enough confidence to act on increasing interest rates without jeopardizing the progress being made.

Overall though, the U.S. Dollar is faring better across the board with positivity built from good housing numbers. The greenback also was not affected tremendously by the Bank of Japan’s announcement in which they upgraded their GDP forecasts, but lowered their inflation expectations, again. It seems like tapering of easing measures will happen everywhere, but in Japan.

EUR

The Euro is trading in wild ranges, swinging within a 75-point range as markets gauge the ECB’s thinking. As expected, rates were not changed, but there seems to be a counterintuitive correlation between the dovish tone of delaying action and the Euro appreciation we are seeing. ECB’s Draghi sounds very cautious yet optimistic.

Furthermore, he said that tighter financing conditions are “the last thing” the ECB wants. As we interpret it, the Euro deserves credit and its value reflects the lack of political calamity that once seemed possible for the continent as well as the economic strengthening that has spread beyond Germany. The ECB just wants to keep enjoying the show and go on vacation.

GBP

The Pound weakened by over half a percent following a lack of agreement on the amount the UK must pay the EU with a now very intense French delegate’s demand that they pay big time. Prime Minister Theresa May is already under a lot of pressure, but now she must explain to Parliament that the EU is serious about payment of obligations before any trade deals is possible.

Bruno Le Maire, France’s Finance Minister, even went as far as quoting former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in saying, “We want our money back.” The tensions play poorly for a Brexit team struggling to have a cohesive message in the face of EU lawmakers ready to make the divorce proceedings punitive.

 


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