The Week in Focus: Apr. 10 – 14 Outlook

Apr. 9, 2017 (Commerzbank AG) – Why wages are rising so slowly

In the US and in Germany we are almost at full employment but wage growth still remains low. We examine the possible causes of this unusual situation. Key factors include the weaker negotiating position of employees against a backdrop of globalisation; the disappointing productivity trend and low inflation expectations. These forces which act as a brake on wages will at best diminish very gradually. This is especially true for the euro zone where the ECB will not hike rates any time soon.

Further topics:

Forecast meeting: Brief euro high

Stronger leading indicators will make it easier for the ECB to sell a “tapering” of bond purchases. But modest core inflation and ECB rates on hold suggest that although EUR/USD could rise to 1.12 by autumn, this is unlikely to be sustained and EUR/USD would then fall back again.

Outlook for the week of 10 to 14 April 2017

  • Economic data: While US consumers are in high spirits, they probably showed some buying restraint in March. In the euro zone, industrial production in February will reveal whether the economy actually moved up a gear at the beginning of the year.
  • Bond market: Amid a short trading week, Bund yields and EGB spreads are running into a liquidity drought though markets could be rattled by a whopping (net) supply at mid-week. EGB spreads should retain their erratic pattern through the week.
  • FX market: In the short term, the dollar will probably gain some ground against the euro amid positive US labour market data and concerns about possible US protectionist measures. However, the euro should maintain the upper hand in the coming months.
  • Equity market: A number of factors suggest that we could be set for a favourable Q1 reporting season. As a result, analysts ought to be more optimistic about the earnings expectations of many companies within the DAX and MDAX.
  • Commodity market: Brent should be able to hang on to its latest gains, as both IEA and OPEC are expected to confirm that the burden of production cuts is more evenly distributed. The IEA is also expected to indicate that the OECD countries have not yet cut inventories, but that this is merely a question of time.


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