October 2015

Prices across the single currency region were flat in October while Europe’s unemployment crisis has eased. American household spending rose by just 0.1% in September, down from 0.4% in August. Canadian economic growth slows…

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Eurozone emerges from deflation as unemployment hits three-year low – live updates” was written by Graeme Wearden, for theguardian.com on Friday 30th October 2015 13.04 UTC

The latest US economic data just hit the wires, and paints a mixed picture of the world’s largest economy.

American household spending rose by just 0.1% in September, down from 0.4% in August, and only half as fast as economists expected.

But US labour costs have risen by 0.6% during the last quarter, up from 0.2% in the previous three months. That’s a broad measure of pay, suggesting salaries are rising as the employment market continues to tighten.

US consumer spending and income

So on balance, it doesn’t really settle the debate on whether US interest rates will go up before Christmas (as covered in the intro).

Updated

Canadian growth slows in August

Digital illustration - Canadian Flag<br />C95250 Digital illustration - Canadian Flag

The global slowdown has rippled across to Canada.

Canadian GDOP rose by only 0.1% in August, data just released showed, down from 0.3% in July.

That follows this week’s trend of slowing growth in the last quarter (in the UK, the US and Spain).

It’s the third monthly expansion in a row in Canada, following contractions earlier in the year. On an annual basis, the economy was only 0.9% bigger than 12 months ago.

Updated

Over in Lisbon, Portugal’s new government is being sworn in after a general election that produced no clear winner.

It means Pedro Passos Coehlo remains as prime minister, but leading a minority government.

Portugal’s president sparked controversy by asking Passos Coehlo to form the next administration, even though left-wing parties won a majority of seats between them.

This sparked talk that a coup had been perpetrated. But in truth, the wheels of democracy will keep turning.

The opposition will get their chance to kick Passos Coehlo out of office early next month, in a vote of confidence on the new government’s policies.

Merkel has used her China trip to call for more protection for Europe’s steel industry, which has been ravaged by falling prices and overcapacity.

Over to Reuters’ Andreas Rinke:

At a German-Sino business congress in Hefei, Merkel calledfor better protection of the steel and solar industries against unfair international competition, a complaint some manufacturers make against China.

Merkel said the steel sector needed “a certain amount of market protection” as steelmakers have pointed out that environmental regulations differ from country to country,impacting cost advantages.

“I also hope that we can extend the rules already in placein the solar sector,” she added.

Updated

Angela Merkel also had an opportunity to pass on some football tips to the next generation today, during a trip to a primary school in Xin Nan Cun.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel visits China<br />epa05003214 German chancellor Angela Merkel (C) visits a physical education class in Xin Nan Cun, China, 30 October 2015. Merkel is on a two-day official visit to China. EPA/SOEREN STACHE

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Angela Merkel has also predicted that China’s economy will avoid a crash, during her trip to Hefei today.

She told journalists:

“I think one can expect that China’s growth will be a bit weaker, but that it will have constant growth.

“It is obvious that particularly the domestic demand through growing cities is an important factor to stimulate consumption and here with growth.”

This is Merkel’s eighth visit to China since becoming Germany’s leader a decade ago, underlining the importance of the links between Berlin and Beijing.

Photos: Angela Merkel visits China

Angela Merkel has been hard at work building closer trade links with China.

The chancellor has put worries over Germany’s economy, and Europe’s escalating refugee crisis behind her. And the latest photos from the trip suggest it’s going well.

Merkel got a warm welcome from students at Hefei University in Hefei, capital of east China’s Anhui Province….

Students with a banner await the arrival of German Chancellor Merkel at the German University in Hefei<br />Students with a banner that reads “Good day, Mrs Merkel!” await the arrival of German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the German University in Hefei October 30, 2015. REUTERS/ JOHANNES EISELE/Pool

…and then shared a drink with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, using beer brewed by the students #cheers

Angela Merkel visit to China - 30 Oct 2015<br />Mandatory Credit: Photo by Xinhua/REX Shutterstock (5331237b) Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (L) and German Chancellor Angela Merkel (C) drink beer brewed by Chinese and German students during their visit to Hefei University in Hefei, capital of east China’s Anhui Province Angela Merkel visit to China - 30 Oct 2015

Merkel also told reporters that Germany favours granting China “market economy status” – a shift that would make it harder for the EU to protect local industry from Chinese competition.

However, Beijing still “has to do some homework, for example in the area of public procurement,” she added (Reuters reports)

German Chancellor Angela Merkel Visits China<br />HEFEI, CHINA - OCTOBER 30: German Chancellor Angela Merkel smiles during a signing ceremony on October 30, 2015 in Hefei, China. Merkel is in Hefei, capital of east China’s Anhui Province, for a one day visit, accompanied by her Chinese counterpart Li Keqiang. (Photo by Johannes Eisele - Pool/Getty Images)

A signing ceremony in Hefei. Photograph: Pool/Getty Images

And she also met a group of children in the Baohe district of Hefei:

Angela Merkel<br />German Chancellor Angela Merkel , left, greets village children in Baohe district of Hefei, China, Friday, Oct. 30, 2015. (Johannes Eisele/Pool photo via AP)

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European Central Bank (ECB) president Mario Draghi addresses a news conference after a meeting of the ECB Governing Council in St Julian’s, outside Valletta, Malta, October 22, 2015. European Central Bank President Mario Draghi said on Thursday monetary policy alone cannot solve the euro zone’s economic problems and called on member countries to take additional actions alongside. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi MALTA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN MALTA

European Central Bank (ECB) president Mario Draghi. Photograph: Darrin Zammit Lupi/Reuters

Mario Draghi will be pleased to see the eurozone clamber out of deflation this month, but it only takes a little pressure off his central bank.

Last week, the ECB chief hinted that more stimulus could be needed soon, as inflation remained sharply off course.

Bill Adams, senior international economist at PNC Financial Services Group, believes Draghi will make an announcement at its next meeting:

The ECB’s most likely next move is to announce an extension in December of the duration of its quantitative easing program to last through March 2017. But hawks on the Governing Council may point to an exit from deflation as a reason for the ECB to continue with asset purchases in 2016, but without as clear a pre-commitment as they made in 2015.

This would provide the ECB with discretion to begin a taper of its easing program earlier than expected if inflation surprises to the upside due to pass-through of higher import prices or higher food prices (unprocessed food prices rose 3.0% from a year earlier in October).

No time like the present, eh?….

Updated

European Union jobless rate hits six-year low

Unemployment in the wider European Union has hit a six-year low of 9.3%, even better than the 3.5 year low of 10.8% in the eurozone:

But that still leaves 22.631 million men and women out of work in the 28 countries which make up the EU.

Eurostat explains:

The EU28 unemployment rate was 9.3% in September 2015, down from 9.4% in August 2015, and from 10.1% in September 2014. This is the lowest rate recorded in the EU28 since September 2009.

But this is still far, far too high — almost twice the levels in the UK and the US.

And many countries are still lagging behind.

The highest rates were recorded in Greece (25.0% in July 2015) and Spain (21.6%) — a reminder that the Spanish recovery hasn’t fully fed through to its labour market.

The lowest were recorded in Germany (4.5%), the Czech Republic (4.8%), Malta (5.1%) and the United Kingdom (5.3% in July 2015).

Updated

It’s almost a year since oil prices began to tumble on the world markets, giving the global economy a deflationary squeeze.

The impact of cheap oil should soon start to drop out of the annual inflation rates, though (as prices will no longer be cheaper than a year ago). And that could send consumer prices indices up again….

This is the second time this year that the eurozone has shaken off a bout of negative inflation:

Updated

Eurozone unemployment hits lowest since January 2012

Europe’s unemployment crisis has eased a little, in another little boost to the region.

Eurostat reports that the overall jobless rate dropped to 10.8% in September, down from 10.9% in August.

That’s lower than economists had expected, and is the lowest level since January 2012.

Although the eurozone’s inflation rate was zero in October, that masks wide differences across the economy.

Today’s eurozone inflation data shows that food prices rose by 1.5% year-on-year in October, while service sector costs were up by 1.3%.

Other goods prices only rose by +0.4%, while energy costs slumped by 8.7%.

So on average prices were unchanged (as the economist with one foot in a bucket of scalding hot water and the other foot in a bucket of ice might put it)

Eurozone inflation rises to 0.0%

The eurozone has emerged from deflation!

Prices across the single currency region were flat in October, having shrunk by 0.1% the previous month.

That’s broadly in line with forecast, and shows how little inflationary pressure there is in the eurozone (due to weak energy prices).

Core inflation (which strips out volatile elements such as energy and food) across the eurozone rose to 1% – well below the ECB’s 2% target.

Updated

European stock markets are subdued this morning, as investors wait for the latest eurozone inflation and unemployment data in 25 minutes.

The FTSE 100 has lost 5 points, or just under 0.1%, while the French and German markets are up just 0.15%.

But still, fears that we could suffer a grim October have not come to pass, with most indices posting strong gains this month:

Looking back at Japan…some economists believe the BoJ may beef up its stimulus package in November, when it meets again.

By then, they should have new growth figures showing whether Japan’s economy shrank in the last quarter, or not.

Mitsuo Shimizu, deputy general manager of Japan Asia Securities Group, says:

“They could move after the next meeting – expectations for more easing aren’t going away.”

But there’s also an argument for waiting until the US central bank’s next meeting in December. If the Fed does hike interest rates, then the yen will weaken against the US dollar without the BoJ needing to do anything….

Italy’s unemployment rate has dipped to its lowest point since January 2013 but still remains worryingly high.

New data shows that the Italian jobless rate fell to 11.8% in September, from 11.9% in August, suggesting prime minister Matteo Renzi’s reform plan may finally be bearing some fruit.

It’s better than economists expected.

In 50 minutes time we get the overall eurozone unemployment report….

Updated

Spain’s recovery has been partly due to a strong tourist season, which helped it overcome the housing crash.

The FT’s Ian Mount explains:

Record spending by foreign tourists has helped speed Spain’s recovery from a double dip recovery that began after its real estate bubble popped in 2008.

Tourists injected €53.8bn into the economy over the first nine months of 2015, 6.3 per cent more than in the same period in 2014.

Capital Economics fears that today’s GDP report shows Spain’s ‘impressive’ recovery is faltering a little:

Holger Sandte of Nordea Markets is concerned that Spain’s building and housing sector is still in the mire:

Spanish GDP up by 0.8% as recovery continues

Spain’s economic recovery continues, although at a slightly lower speed.

The Spanish statistics body reports that GDP rose by 0.8% in the last three months, compared to 1% in the second quarter of this year.

On an annual basis, the economy grew by 3.4%, up from 3.1%.

This is the 9th consecutive quarter of growth in Spain, which has been one of the best performing European economics since the debt crisis eased in 2012.

Spanish GDP

Spanish GDP Photograph: Spanish statistics office

Spain is the first eurozone country to report growth figures (we get most of the data in two weeks time).

Today’s numbers mean it is growing faster than the UK, which reported a GDP increase of 0.5% on Tuesday. It also beats America’s annualised rate of 1.5% (which is <0.4% on a quarter-on-quarter basis).

Reaction to follow….

Kuroda predicts moderate recovery for global economy

Governor Kuroda is also trying to dampen fears over China’s economy, and its impact on Japan.

He says he agrees with the IMF that the slowdown in China could last longer than expected, which would be bad for Japanese trade:

Many Japanese companies operate in East Asia so their profits may also be affected.

But he’s still optimistic that the region’s economies are resilient enough to cope:

Our main scenario is for the global economy to recover moderately, driven by the strength in advanced economies.”

Here’s some instant reaction to BoJ governor Haruhiko Kuroda’s comments:

BoJ’s Kuroda: We won’t hesitate to do more

The Bank of Japan (BOJ) building in Tokyo, October 30, 2015. The Bank of Japan held off on expanding its massive stimulus program on Friday, preferring to save its dwindling policy options in the hope that the economy can overcome the drag from China’s slowdown without additional monetary support. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

The Bank of Japan (BOJ) building in Tokyo today. Photograph: Thomas Peter/Reuters

The Bank of Japan has fuelled speculation that it could soon announce fresh stimulus measures, after cutting the Bank’s inflation and growth forecasts.

Governor Haruhiko Kuroda has just told a press conference that the BoJ has more ammunition at its disposal, as it battles against the deflationary pressures gripping the globe.

Kuroda insisted that the BoJ could still hit its target of getting inflation to 2% (even it is is taking longer than hoped), saying:

“We won’t hesitate to make necessary policy adjustments if we judge that there is a change in the broad price trend.”

“I’m not thinking of raising or lowering the current 2% inflation target.”

And on the details of monetary policy, Kuroda declared:

“I don’t think there are limits to our policy options.”

Kuroda was speaking after the BoJ left its current stimulus programme unchanged at its latest policy meeting, despite evidence that Japan hasn’t shaken off the spectre of deflation.

The BoJ also cut its forecast for real economic growth for the current fiscal year to 1.2% from 1.7%. It also kicked back the target for hitting 2% inflation to the back end of 2016, or even early 2017, from the middle of next year.

Some analysts had thought the Bank might boost its 80 trillion yen annual asset-buying scheme today, but Japan’s policymakers are hopeful that the global economy will pick up.

But there are signs that more may be needed. New figures showed that consumer prices fell 0.1% in the year to September, a second monthly decline, while household spending slid 1.3 percent from a year earlier.

More here:

Updated

The Agenda: Will eurozone emerge from deflation?

Good morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of the world economy, the financial markets, the eurozone and business.

It looks like another busy day for economic news, as policymakers, analysts and the public all ponder the state of the global economy as the year grinds towards its close (just 55 sleeps till Christmas, folks!)

In Europe, the latest inflation data come at 10am GMT. It may show that prices stopped falling in the eurozone, after dropping by 0.1% in September.

We also get European unemployment figures – likely to show that the eurozone jobless crisis is still severe:

EU jobs

Europe’s unemployment rate has been stubbornly high since the debt crisis began Photograph: ONS

There’s also a flurry of data coming our way from across the Atlantic. That includes US personal spending stats at 12.30pm and the University of Michigan confidence report at 2pm GMT.

They’ll both provide more ammunition for the ongoing debate about whether the Federal Reserve will take the plunge and raise interest rates at its December meeting (just 47 sleeps to go!).

Canada will become the latest major economy to report growth figures – economists predict that growth slowed to 0.1% in August from 0.3% in July.

And in the City, it’s quite busy for a Friday.

BG Group, the oil company, has been hit by the weak crude price:

And Royal Bank of Scotland has suffered an operating loss of £134m in the last quarter, after taking a £847m charge to cover restructuring costs.

It still managed to post a net profit though:

More details on that later, along with all the main events through the day….

Updated

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USA 

0ct. 29, 2015 (Allthingsforex.com) – In its preliminary estimate released today, the Bureau of Economic Analysis said that the pace of expansion in the world’s largest economy slowed to 1.5% compared with 3.9% in the second quarter of 2015. Read the official press release here.

“Real gross domestic product — the value of the goods and services produced by the nation’s economy less the value of the goods and services used up in production, adjusted for price changes — increased at an annual rate of 1.5 percent in the third quarter of 2015, according to the “advance” estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis.

In the second quarter, real GDP increased 3.9 percent. The Bureau emphasized that the third-quarter advance estimate released today is based on source data that are incomplete or subject to further revision by the source agency (see the box on page 2 and “Comparisons of Revisions to GDP” on page 4). The “second” estimate for the third quarter, based on more complete data, will be released on November 24, 2015. The increase in real GDP in the third quarter primarily reflected positive contributions from personal consumption expenditures (PCE), state and local government spending, nonresidential fixed investment, exports, and residential fixed investment that were partly offset by negative contributions from private inventory investment. Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased. Real GDP increased 1.5 percent in the third quarter, after increasing 3.9 percent in the second. The deceleration in real GDP in the third quarter primarily reflected a downturn in private inventory investment and decelerations in exports, in nonresidential fixed investment, in PCE, in state and local government spending, and in residential fixed investment that were partly offset by a deceleration in imports.

FOOTNOTE

Quarterly estimates are expressed at seasonally adjusted annual rates, unless otherwise specified. Percent changes are calculated from unrounded data and are annualized. “Real” estimates are in chained (2009) dollars. Price indexes are chain-type measures. Real gross domestic purchases — purchases by U.S. residents of goods and services wherever produced — increased 1.5 percent in the third quarter, compared with an increase of 3.6 percent in the second. Current-dollar GDP — the market value of the goods and services produced by the nation’s economy less the value of the goods and services used up in production — increased 2.7 percent, or $121.1 billion, in the third quarter to a level of $18,034.8 billion. In the second quarter, current-dollar GDP increased 6.1 percent, or $264.4 billion. Disposition of personal income Current-dollar personal income increased $171.6 billion in the third quarter, compared with an increase of $139.5 billion in the second. The acceleration in personal income primarily reflected an acceleration in wages and salaries and an upturn in farm proprietors’ income that were partly offset by a deceleration in personal interest income. Personal current taxes increased $15.8 billion in the third quarter, compared with an increase of $27.3 billion in the second. Disposable personal income increased $155.9 billion, or 4.8 percent, in the third quarter, compared with an increase of $112.2 billion, or 3.4 percent, in the second. Real disposable personal income increased 3.5 percent, compared with an increase of 1.2 percent. Personal outlays increased $136.6 billion in the third quarter, compared with an increase of $182.3 billion in the second. Personal saving — disposable personal income less personal outlays — was $636.7 billion in the third quarter, compared with $617.5 billion in the second. The personal saving rate — personal saving as a percentage of disposable personal income — was 4.7 percent in the third quarter, compared with an increase of 4.6 percent in the second.”

 


Oct. 28, 2015 (Allthingsforex.com) – The Federal Open Markets Committee decided today to keep rates unchanged, postponing the timing of the Fed’s first rate hike since 2006 but keeping the door open to future increases. Featured below is the FOMC monetary policy statement.

“Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in September suggests that economic activity has been expanding at a moderate pace. Household spending and business fixed investment have been increasing at solid rates in recent months, and the housing sector has improved further; however, net exports have been soft. The pace of job gains slowed and the unemployment rate held steady. Nonetheless, labor market indicators, on balance, show that underutilization of labor resources has diminished since early this year. Inflation has continued to run below the Committee’s longer-run objective, partly reflecting declines in energy prices and in prices of non-energy imports. Market-based measures of inflation compensation moved slightly lower; survey-based measures of longer-term inflation expectations have remained stable.

Consistent with its statutory mandate, the Committee seeks to foster maximum employment and price stability. The Committee expects that, with appropriate policy accommodation, economic activity will expand at a moderate pace, with labor market indicators continuing to move toward levels the Committee judges consistent with its dual mandate. The Committee continues to see the risks to the outlook for economic activity and the labor market as nearly balanced but is monitoring global economic and financial developments. Inflation is anticipated to remain near its recent low level in the near term but the Committee expects inflation to rise gradually toward 2 percent over the medium term as the labor market improves further and the transitory effects of declines in energy and import prices dissipate. The Committee continues to monitor inflation developments closely.

To support continued progress toward maximum employment and price stability, the Committee today reaffirmed its view that the current 0 to 1/4 percent target range for the federal funds rate remains appropriate. In determining whether it will be appropriate to raise the target range at its next meeting, the Committee will assess progress–both realized and expected–toward its objectives of maximum employment and 2 percent inflation. This assessment will take into account a wide range of information, including measures of labor market conditions, indicators of inflation pressures and inflation expectations, and readings on financial and international developments. The Committee anticipates that it will be appropriate to raise the target range for the federal funds rate when it has seen some further improvement in the labor market and is reasonably confident that inflation will move back to its 2 percent objective over the medium term.

The Committee is maintaining its existing policy of reinvesting principal payments from its holdings of agency debt and agency mortgage-backed securities in agency mortgage-backed securities and of rolling over maturing Treasury securities at auction. This policy, by keeping the Committee’s holdings of longer-term securities at sizable levels, should help maintain accommodative financial conditions.

When the Committee decides to begin to remove policy accommodation, it will take a balanced approach consistent with its longer-run goals of maximum employment and inflation of 2 percent. The Committee currently anticipates that, even after employment and inflation are near mandate-consistent levels, economic conditions may, for some time, warrant keeping the target federal funds rate below levels the Committee views as normal in the longer run.

Voting for the FOMC monetary policy action were: Janet L. Yellen, Chair; William C. Dudley, Vice Chairman; Lael Brainard; Charles L. Evans; Stanley Fischer; Dennis P. Lockhart; Jerome H. Powell; Daniel K. Tarullo; and John C. Williams. Voting against the action was Jeffrey M. Lacker, who preferred to raise the target range for the federal funds rate by 25 basis points at this meeting.”

 

Oct. 27, 2015 (Allthingsforex.com) – The UK Office for National Statistics reported today that, according to its preliminary estimate, the UK economy grew less than expected in the third quarter compared with the pace of economic expansion in Q2 2015.

  • Change in gross domestic product (GDP) is the main indicator of economic growth. GDP is estimated to have increased by 0.5% in Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2015 compared with growth of 0.7% in Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2015.
  • Output increased in 3 of the main industrial groupings within the economy in Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2015. Services increased by 0.7%, production increased by 0.3% and agriculture increased by 0.5%. In contrast, construction growth decreased by 2.2%.
  • Within production, manufacturing fell by 0.3% but this fall was offset by a 2.4% increase in Mining and Quarrying and a 1.2% increase in water and waste management.
  • GDP was 2.3% higher in Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2015 compared with the same quarter a year ago.
  • In Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2015, GDP was estimated to have been 6.4% higher than the pre-economic downturn peak of Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2008. From the peak in Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2008 to the trough in Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2009, the economy shrank by 6.1%.
  • The preliminary estimate of GDP is produced using the output approach to measuring GDP. At this stage, data content is less than half of the total required for the final output estimate. The estimate is subject to revision as more data become available, but these revisions are typically small between the preliminary and third estimates of GDP.
  • All figures in this release are seasonally adjusted.

German bosses are more optimistic about future prospects but UK factories suffer as exports fall the fastest since 2012. Portuguese government bonds are coming under some pressure today as investors react to the unfolding political crisis…

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Germany shrugs off VW crisis, but UK factory orders slide – business live” was written by Graeme Wearden, for theguardian.com on Monday 26th October 2015 13.26 UTC

Portuguese bonds hit by political crisis

Portuguese government bonds are coming under some pressure today as investors react to the unfolding political crisis in Lisbon.

While most eurozone bonds have strengthened today, Portugal has gone the other way, pushing up the yield (or interest rate) on its 10-year debt from 2.37% to 2.45%.

Portuguese 10-year bond yield
Portuguese 10-year bond yield today Photograph: Thomson Reuters

The move came after opposition parties vowed to bring down Portugal’s new government in a confidence vote later this week. They’re furious that the centre-right coalition, led by former PM Pedro Passos Coelho, has been invited to form another administration despite failing to win a majority in this month’s election.

In taking this decision, Portugal’s president Cavaco Silva has enraged some certain commentators who argue that he’s “banned” the Portuguese left-wing a fair crack at power in a massive failure for democracy.

It’s a complicated situation, though. No party won an overall majority, although Passos Coelho’s group came first with 38% of the vote. The socialists came second with 32% followed by the hard left Left Bloc with 10% and the communists with 7%.

Those three left-wing parties *could* form a majority, but instead president Silva passed the mandate to Passos Coelho. Crucially, and controversially, he also warned that the far-left parties’ anti-EU views were a threat to Portugal.

Politics lecturer Chris Hanretty has written a good blogpost here, explaining why talk of a coup in Portugal is a little simplistic.

He says:

Often, there is no right or obvious answer to the question, “who won the election?”. But if Cavaco Silva’s decision is wrong, then it will be righted automatically by the actions of Parliament in less than a fortnight’s time.

If that happens, the alarmists will have been proven wrong. Unfortunately, attention will likely have moved on.

Sam Tombs of consultancy firm Pantheon Macroeconomic fears that UK factories will continue to struggle because of the strong pound.

He’s created a chart showing how exports fall after the the pound strengthens (the inverted left-hand scale, shifted forwards nine months).

And that correlation means factory orders could continue to weaken, Tombs explains:

The chart shows that the worst is not over for the manufacturing sector; sterling’s further appreciation over the last year will continue to depress export orders until mid-2016, at least.

IHS economist Howard Archer is alarmed by the drop in UK factory orders reported by the CBI:

This is a thoroughly disappointing survey through and through which indicates that manufacturers’ struggles are intensifying as a moderation in domestic demand adds to a still weakening export outlook.

Persistent and seemingly deepening manufacturing weakness is very worrying for hopes that UK growth can ultimately become more balanced and less dependent on the services sector and consumer spending.

Factory fears as UK exports fall at fastest pace since 2012

A turbine at Alstom power plant turbine refurbishment facility in Rugby.
A turbine at Alstom power plant turbine refurbishment facility in Rugby. Photograph: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

More signs that UK manufacturers are having a tough time as they contend with China’s downturn and a stronger pound.

The latest survey of factory bosses by business group CBI suggests orders have dropped from both within the UK and outside. The report’s key order book balance is the weakest for more than two years.

This does not bode well for official GDP figures due on Tuesday that will give the first snapshot of UK growth in the third quarter. The consensus forecast is for quarterly growth of 0.6% in the July-September period, down from 0.7% in the second quarter, according to a Reuters poll.

The CBI’s report suggests that in the three months to October new export orders fell at the fastest pace in three years. That was possibly down to the continued strength of the pound, which makes UK goods more expensive to overseas buyers, the CBI said.

Total new domestic orders fell over the quarter for the first time since April 2013.

Manufacturing production also edged downwards during the three months to October, marking the first decline in the last two years, according to the CBI Quarterly Industrial Trends Survey.

Against that backdrop, manufacturers’ optimism about both their business situation and export prospects for the year ahead fell at the fastest pace since October 2012, according to the poll of 463 companies. But they predicted that overall manufacturing conditions will stabilise in the next three months, with a small rise in output.

Rain Newton-Smith, CBI director of economics, says UK manufacturers are being buffeted at home and abroad.

“Manufacturers have been struggling with weak export demand for several months, because of the strength of the pound and subdued global growth. But now they’re also facing pressure back home as domestic demand is easing.”

And here are the key figures from the report:

  • 22% of businesses reported an increase in total new order books and 30% a decrease, giving a balance of -8%, the lowest since October 2012.
  • 20% of businesses reported an increase in domestic orders, with 31% noting a decrease. The balance for domestic orders (-11%) was below the long-run average (-5%), the lowest since April 2013 (-14%).
  • 15% reported an increase in export orders, with 33% signalling a decrease. The resulting balance for export orders (-17%) signalled a faster decrease in orders than the historic average (-7%). This marks the lowest rate since October 2012 (-17%).

Germany’s central bank reckons that the country’s economy remains “quite strong”, despite signs that growth slowed in the last three months.

Peterson leaves Southwark Crown Court in London<br />Magnus Peterson leaves Southwark Crown Court in London October 14, 2014. Magnus Peterson, the founder of the $600 million Weavering hedge fund that collapsed in the wake of the credit crisis in 2009, pleaded not guilty to 16 fraud-related charges at his London trial on Tuesday. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS) - RTR4A646
Magnus Peterson in 2014. Photograph: Stefan Wermuth / Reuters/REUTERS

Former hedge fund boss Magnus Peterson has just been banned from the City, over one of the biggest rogue trading scandals of recent years.

Peterson’s Weavering Macro Fixed Income Fund collapsed in 2009, costing investors around £350m. It had been marketed as a safe and secure investment, which investors could easily reclaim their funds from.

But once the financial crisis struck, Peterson embarked on a series of risky wagers on financial derivatives which failed to reverse its fortunes. He was convicted of several counts of fraud, after the high court heard how he had taken out $600m of swap contracts, which turned out to be worthless, with another company under his control.

Mark Steward, director of enforcement and market oversight at the FCA, says Peterson has been banned to protect consumer and markets.

“Mr Peterson defrauded investors who should have been able to trust him. Over a prolonged period he purposely used investors’ money to prop up his business, and then lied in order to cover up his deception.”

This makes little practical difference to Peterson, aged 51, right now, as he was jailed for 13 years in January.

Updated

9% hacked off TalkTalk shares after cybercrime attack

Back in the City, UK telecoms group TalkTalk is the biggest faller on the stock market after suffering a major cybercrime attack last week.

TalkTalk shares have slumped by around 9.5% this morning. Last week, the firm admitted that customers’ personal and financial details could have been stolen by cybercriminals who breached its security systems.

TalkTalk boss Dido Harding told my colleague Josh Halliday last night that it’s too early to say if the company will compensate those affected.

She also argued that TalkTalk’s security was better than its rivals, despite the breach:

“Nobody is perfect. God knows, we’ve just demonstrated that our website security wasn’t perfect – I’m not going to pretend it is – but we take it incredibly seriously.

“On that specific vulnerability, it’s much better than it was and we are head and shoulders better than some of our competitors and some of the media bodies that were throwing those particular stones.”

And despite criticism from shareholders, Harding is determined to hold onto her job:

Updated

IFO: German car industry unfazed by VW scandal

IFO economist Klaus Wohlrabe has confirmed that Germany’s auto industry is shrugging off the revelations that VW deliberately cheated on emissions tests.

Speaking to Reuters about today’s IFO report, Wohlrabe pointed out that business expectations and the assessment of current conditions in the sector had both improved this month.

That helped to push IFO’s measure of business confidence higher this month, from 103.3 to 103.8.

Wohlrabe says:

The German automobile industry appears to be unfazed by the VW scandal.

Updated

German business leaders aren’t frightened by the crisis at Volkswagen, and the slowdown in emerging markets, explains Carsten Brzeski of ING.

Here’s his analysis on today’s IFO report:

Surprised but not frightened? German businesses showed an interesting reaction to the recent series of uncertainties and turmoil. In fact, the reaction can be summarized as impressed but not frightened.

Germany’s most prominent leading indicator, the just released Ifo index dropped to 108.2 in October, from 108.5 in September. The first drop since June this year. Interestingly, the drop was exclusively driven by a weaker assessment of the current situation. The expectation component, on the other side, increased to 103.8, from 103.3, continuing its recent positive trend and actually reaching the highest level since June last year.

Of course, one should not interpret too much in a single confidence indicator but today’s Ifo reading suggests that the German business community is filing the Volkswagen scandal as a one-off and also shrugs off the risk from a possible Chinese and emerging markets slowdown. Despite these external uncertainties and regular concerns about the real strength of the German economy, German business remain highly optimistic.

There are two possible explanations for this trend: either German businesses are naive optimists or ice-cold realists, sticking to the facts. In our view, there are many arguments in favour of the latter.

Updated

The euro is slightly higher following the IFO survey:

Updated

German IFO survey: What the experts say

Today’s German business confidence survey shows Europe’s powerhouse economy remains in decent health, say City experts.

Economist Frederik Ducrozet is encouraged by the rise in business expectation this month:

Die Welt’s Holger Zschaepitz points out that confidence in the German carmaking industry rose this month:

Bloomberg’s Maxime Sbaihi points out that demand within Germany is still robust:

Updated

German business climate worsens, but expectations rise

Business conditions in Germany have fallen this month, according to the latest survey of corporate confidence in Europe’s latest economy.

The IFO thinktank has just reported that current conditions in the German economy have deteriorated this month, for the first time in four months.

But IFO also found that business leaders are more upbeat about future prospects than in September. That suggests the VW emissions scandal has not caused major trauma.

IFO’s business climate index fell to 108.2 in October, down from 108.5 in September, but rather higher than expected.

The current conditions index fell to 112.6, from 114 a month ago. That suggests that business leaders are finding life a bit harder — after seeing exports and factory orders deteriorate over the summer.

But the expectations index rose to 103.8, from 103.3, indicating that Germany PLC expects to ride out the slowdown in China and other emerging markets, and the Volkswagen saga.

I’ll mop up some reaction now…

Updated

Speaking of carmakers…Japan’s Toyota has overtaken Germany’s Volkswagen to become the world’s largest carmaker.

Toyota has reported that it sold almost 7.5 million cars in the third quarter of 2015, while VW sold 7.43m.

Does that show that the diesel emissions scandal has hurt VW? Not really — that news only broke in mid-September, giving little opportunity for it to show up in these figures.

But it does show that VW may already have been finding life tougher, even before admitting that around 11 million vehicles were sold with software to trick emissions tests.

(FILES) - The logo of French car maker PSA Peugeot is seen on a car parked in front of French Economy minstry (left) in Paris, on September 11, 2012. French auto giant PSA Peugeot Citroen’s worldwide sales in 2012 dropped by 16.5 percent in 2012 due to contracting demand in debt-crippled southern Europe and the suspension of its activities in Iran, it said in a statement on January 9, 2013. AFP PHOTO JOEL SAGETJOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images

Shares in French carmaker Peugeot are down 2% this morning, after reporting a 4.4% drop in sales in China and South East Asia.

That took the shine off a 3.8% rise in sales in Europe.

WPP: business leaders remain ‘risk averse’

Sir Martin Sorrell, WPP chief executive, hides his head in his hand.

Advertising titan WPP is among the biggest fallers in London, down around 2%, despite reporting a 3.3% rise in net sales in the last six months.

Traders may be discouraged by a warning that “risk averse” business leaders are reluctant to stick their necks out too far, given the current geopolitical tensions.

WPP told shareholders that:

Country specific slowdowns in China and Brazil and geopolitical issues remain top of business leaders’ concerns. The continuing crisis in the Ukraine and consequent bilateral sanctions, principally affecting Russia, continued tensions in the Middle East and North Africa and the risk of possible exits from the European Community, driven by further political and economic trouble in Greece, top the agenda.

Corporate bosses are also facing a two-pronged squeeze — from new technology rivals on one side, and cost-cutting activists on the other, WPP added:

If you are trying to run a legacy business, at one end of the spectrum you have the disrupters like Uber and Airbnb and at the other end you have the cost-focused models like 3G in fast moving consumer goods, and Valeant and Endo in pharmaceuticals, whilst in the middle, hovering above you, you have the activists led by such as Nelson Peltz, Bill Ackman and Dan Loeb, emphasising short-term performance.

Not surprising then, that corporate leaders tend to be risk averse.

European markets in muted mood

As predicted, Europe’s stock markets have fallen into the red this morning.

The FTSE 100 has shed arounds 33 points, or 0.5%, as Tony Cross of Trustnet Direct, explains:

It has been a surprisingly muted overnight session in Asia with markets showing little reaction to Friday’s rate cut news out of China.

London’s FTSE-100 is failing to find any inspiration off the back of the news either, with the vast majority of stocks mired in red ink shortly after the open.

The other main markets are also down, apart from Germany’s DAX which is flat.

European stock markets, early trading, October 26 2015
European stock markets in early trading today. Photograph: Thomson Reuters

Mining and energy stocks are generally lower, showing that concerns over global growth haven’t gone away.

Connor Campbell of SpreadEx says:

The FTSE, falling by around 25 points soon after the bell, was weighed down by (what else?) its mining and oil stocks, with investors seemingly less sure about the Chinese rate cut than they were last Friday

Larry Elliott: Why China’s interest rate cut may be bad news for the world economy

By cutting interest rates, China’s central bank risks creating further instability in a global economy that is already hooked on ultra-cheap money and regular hits of stimulus.

As our economic editor Larry Elliott explains, such stimulus measures may already be less effective too:

Problem number one is that by deliberately weakening their exchange rates, countries are stealing growth from each other. Central banks insist that this does not represent a return to the competitive devaluations and protectionism of the 1930s, but it is starting to look awfully like it.

Problem number two is that the monetary stimulus is becoming less and less effective over time. There are two main channels through which QE operates. One is through the exchange rate, but the policy doesn’t work if all countries want a cheaper currency at once. Then, as the weakness of global trade testifies, it is simply robbing Peter to pay Paul.

The other channel is through long-term interest rates, which are linked to the price of bonds. When central banks buy bonds, they reduce the available supply and drive up the price. Interest rates (the yield) on bonds move in the opposite direction to the price, so a higher price means borrowing is cheaper for businesses, households and governments.

But when bond yields are already at historic lows, it is hard to drive them much lower even with large dollops of QE. In Keynes’s immortal words, central banks are pushing on a piece of string….

Here’s Larry’s full analysis on the rate cut:

Copper, a classic measure of the health of the global economy, hasn’t benefitted much from China’s rate cut. It’s only up by 0.2% this morning.

Chinese officials to agree next five-year plan

China is also in the spotlight today as top communist officials gather to hammer out its 13th five-year plan, setting the country’s economic programme until 2020.

Premier Li Keqiang has already indicated that slower growth is on the agenda, by declaring that Beijing will not “defend to the death” its target of 7% growth (which was narrowly missed in the third quarter of 2015).

He declared:

“We have never said that we should defend to the death any goal, but that the economy should operate within a reasonable range.”

Trade links and green issues will also be discussed, as China’s top brass try to manage the country’s economic rebalancing.

With China easing monetary policy last week, and the ECB expected to follow suit in December, it could soon be Japan’s turn to stimulate its economy again….

No jubilation in Hong Kong either, where the Hang Seng index just closed 0.2% lower.

Asian market creep higher after Chinese rate cut

Investors in Asia have given China’s interest rate cut a cautious reception overnight, but there’s no sign of euphoria.

In Shanghai, the main index of Chinese shares rose by just 0.5%, or 17 points, to 3430. Although Friday’s stimulus move has been welcomed, traders are also worrying about whether China is still going to suffer a hard landing.

Said Zhang Qi, an analyst at Haitong Securities in Shanghai, says shares got a small lift from the rate cut:

“But the market appeared to be in correction after it rose a lot in October, and some investors sold stocks on the short-lived rise from the rate cuts. So overall, the market stayed stable today.”

Japan’s Nikkei gained around 0.7%, but the Australian S&P market dipped a little despite hopes that its mining sector would benefit from Chinese stimulus moves.

Asian stock markets, October 26
Here’s the situation across Asia’s stock markets Photograph: Thomson Reuters

Updated

The agenda: Investors await German confidence figures

Good morning, and welcome to our rolling coverage of the world economy, the financial markets, the eurozone and business.

Today we’ll find out whether business confidence in Germany has been badly hit by the Volkswagen saga, and the slowdown in emerging markets.

The latest IFO survey, due at 9am GMT, is expect to show that German firms are gloomier about their prospects. That’s understandable, given the drop in German exports, factory output and orders in August.

We’ll also be mopping up the reaction to China’s interest rate cut, announced late last week.

That did give shares a boost on Friday afternoon, but European stock markets are tipped to fall back this morning, as concerns over the situation in China reemerge.

China’s rate cut came just a day after the European Central Bank hinted that it could boost its stimulus package soon, so investors have lots to ponder.

China cuts interest rates in surprise move – as it happened

In the corporate world, traders are digesting results from advertising giant WPP and French carmaker Peugeot.

And we’ll also be keeping an eye on Portugal, where the president has dramatically asked centre-right leader Pedro Passos Coelho to form another government, rather than two eurosceptic left-wing parties.

Portugal Government Fuels Debate About Democracy in Europe

We’ll be tracking all the main events through the day…..

Updated

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World markets rise as investors welcome boost from cheaper credit in China and prospects for further delay to Federal Reserve rate hike in US. The unexpected rate cut, the sixth since November last year, reduced the main bank base rate to 4.35%…

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “China interest rate cut fuels fears over ailing economy” was written by Phillip Inman Economics correspondent, for The Guardian on Friday 23rd October 2015 13.24 UTC

China fuelled fears that its ailing economy is about to slow further after Beijing cut its main interest rate by 0.25 percentage points.

The unexpected rate cut, the sixth since November last year, reduced the main bank base rate to 4.35%. The one-year deposit rate will fall to 1.5% from 1.75%.

The move follows official data earlier this week showing that economic growth in the latest quarter fell to a six-year low of 6.9%. A decline in exports was one of the biggest factors, blamed partly by analysts on the high value of China’s currency, the yuan.

The rate cut sent European stock markets higher as investors welcomed the boost from cheaper credit in China, together with the hint of further monetary easing by the European Central Bank president, Mario Draghi, on Thursday.

Investors were also buoyed by the likelihood that the US Federal Reserve would be forced to signal another delay to the first US rate rise since the financial crash of 2008-2009 until later next year.

The FTSE 100 was up just over 90 points, or 1.4%, at 6466, while the German Dax and French CAC were up almost 3%.

The People’s Bank of China’s last rate cut in August triggered turmoil in world markets after Beijing combined the decision with a 2% reduction in the yuan’s value. Shocked at the prospect of a slide in the Chinese currency, investors panicked and sent markets plunging.

Some economists have warned that the world economy is about to experience a third leg of post-crash instability after the initial banking collapse and eurozone crisis. The slowdown in China, as it reduces debts and a dependence for growth on investment in heavy industry and property, will be the third leg.

World trade has already contracted this year with analysts forecasting weaker trade next year. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) in July trimmed its forecast for global economic growth for this year to 3.1% from 3.3% previously, mainly as a result of China’s slowing growth. The Washington-based fund also warned that the weak recovery in the west risks turning into near stagnation.

At its October annual meeting, it said growth in the advanced countries of the west is forecast to pick up slightly, from 1.8% in 2014 to 2% in 2015 while growth in the rest of the world is expected to fall from 4.6% to 4%.

Sanjiv Shah, chief investment Officer of Sun Global Investments, said: “The Chinese decision indicates that the authorities are clearly worried about the slowdown in the pace of economic growth and have decide to engage in more pre-emptive action. The [People’s Bank of China] has cut benchmark rates and reduced banks’ reserve requirements as well as scrapping deposit controls.”

But Mark Williams, chief Asia economist at Capital Economics, remained upbeat about the prospects for China’s sustained growth, arguing that the cut in interest rates was part of a longer-term strategy and not a reaction to deteriorating growth.

“The key point is that we shouldn’t take today’s announcement as evidence that policymakers have grown more concerned about the economy. Instead, this is a controlled easing cycle that underlines how China’s policymakers, unlike many of their peers elsewhere, still have room for policy manoeuvre,” he said.

“Admittedly, we’re still waiting for clear evidence of an economic turnaround – September’s activity data still don’t show any great improvement. Nonetheless, with more stimulus in the pipeline, we still believe the economy will look stronger soon.”

Corporations considered bellwethers of the global economy have also warned of a sharp slowdown. Caterpillar, the industrial equipment manufacturer, has seen profits slide over the last year. AP Moller-Maersk, the shipping firm cut its 2015 profit forecast by 15% on Friday, blaming a slowdown in the container shipping market.

The Danish conglomerate operates Maersk Line, the world’s largest container shipping company which transports roughly 20% of all goods on the busiest routes between Asia and Europe.

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European Central Bank refrains from reducing the benchmark rate and keeps monetary policy on hold at Malta meeting. Markets prepare for hints of more QE to come at the ECB press conference. UK retail sales get a boost in September…

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Markets expect Draghi to hint of more QE – business live” was written by Julia Kollewe, for theguardian.com on Thursday 22nd October 2015 11.52 UTC

Here’s the ECB’s brief statement:

At today’s meeting, which was held in Malta, the Governing Council of the ECB decided that the interest rate on the main refinancing operations and the interest rates on the marginal lending facility and the deposit facility will remain unchanged at 0.05%, 0.30% and -0.20% respectively.”

The ECB cut rates to record levels to kickstart the economy over a year ago. The main refinancing rate determines the cost of credit in the economy, while the marginal lending facility is the emergency overnight borrowing rate for banks. The deposit facility is the rate on bank overnight deposits, which banks pay to park funds at the central bank.

ECB president Mario Draghi will set out the central bank’s thinking at a press conference at 1.30pm UK time, and whether the bank will make any adjustments to its €60bn a month bond-buying programme.

The ECB has kept its key interest rates unchanged at record lows, as expected.

Updated

However…

Markets steady ahead of ECB decision

Markets are steady ahead of the ECB’s policy decision at 12.45 UK time. The FTSE is trading 0.1% lower at 6340.48 after a profit warning from building merchant Travis Perkins dragged down housing stocks. Germany’s Dax has climbed 0.4% and France’s CAC is 0.15% ahead.

Chris Beauchamp, senior market analyst at spread-betting firm IG, said:

A steady battle of attrition continues in London, with the index still unable to establish a direction after four days of relentless grind. However, at least today we have a real reason for not moving too far – namely the ECB meeting. The general consensus is that Mario Draghi needs to do something to get things moving in the eurozone, but there is a sense that neither the ECB nor financial markets know exactly what that will be. We can hope for some indication that action is on its way, although the ECB president will be understandably keen to keep the details under wraps for now.

Housebuilders are jittery this morning after building merchant Travis Perkins warned on earnings. Weaker demand of late has taken the shine off a steady rise in sales overall, raising concerns that such names as Persimmon, Taylor Wimpey and others may be in line for a more sustained correction.”

Labour has responded to George Osborne’s comment that he is “comfortable” with his decision to cut tax credits. Shadow chancellor John McDonnell said:

Once again we’re seeing the true face of the Tory Party. It is shameful that David Cameron talked about his ‘delight’ at tax credit cuts and now George Osborne has said he is ‘comfortable’ with his decision to take £1,300 a year away from working families.

It’s time for David Cameron and George Osborne to think again and reverse these tax credit cuts.”


Expectations that ECB policymakers will announce fresh stimulus measures have gradually faded since governing council member Ewald Nowotny said last week euro area inflation is ‘clearly missing’ the ECB’s target, noted Jasper Lawler, market analyst at CMC Markets UK. Christian Noyer’s submission that the current QE is “well calibrated” is probably a better reflection of opinion on the governing council.

The ECB embarked on a scheme of sovereign bond purchases (quantitative easing) in March – more than €1 trillion in all at a rate of €60bn a month.

Lawler has looked at the ECB’s options:

A change to QE can really take three forms; increasing the size of asset purchases, increasing the length of the program or adding new assets to the mix such as corporate bonds. It is ten months until the programme is scheduled to end so increasing the length of the program seems rather premature.

Europe’s corporate bond market is not as deep as in the US with most companies traditionally favouring bank lending. Adding corporate bonds to the mix would probably work more as a signal of dovish intent than for any real impact on yields or the euro. If the ECB decided to buy shares or ETFs like the Bank of Japan, that would be a game changer and we’d be off to the races in European equities, but chances are slim.

Increasing the size of the programme would probably put the most downward pressure on the euro of all the likely options. However, the ECB runs the risk of crowding out private bondholders with more purchases, and would add to exit risks once the program finishes.”

So what are we expecting from the European Central Bank today?

As my colleague Graeme Wearden reported:

Economists predict that ECB president Mario Draghi will repeat his pledge from September to add more stimulus if needed. However, few expect decisive action this week.

“The ECB’s October meeting is for watching. Draghi’s message will be dovish, but it’s not time to act yet”, said Holger Sandte, chief European analyst at Nordea Bank.

The ECB is currently committed to buying €60bn (£40bn) of government and corporate bonds each month until September 2016, in an €1.1tn (£810bn) attempt to stimulate growth, inflation and bank lending.

Capital Economics’s Jonathan Loynes expects the ECB to boost its QE firepower to €80bn a month in December, but does not totally rule out an announcement this week.

Updated

George Osborne has welcomed the intervention of Mark Carney in the debate about Britain’s future in the European Union, saying the Bank of England governor has set out the principles for renegotiation, Heather Stewart writes. Read the full story here.

Osborne defends tax credit cuts

My colleague Heather Stewart, the Observer’s economics editor, reports:

George Osborne has defended his planned tax credit cuts to backbench MPs on the cross-party Treasury select committee.

The chancellor has come under growing pressure to soften the proposals; but he insisted: “this is fundamentally a judgment call, and I’m comfortable with the judgment call that I have made, and that the House of Commons has supported this week.” He urged the House of Lords not to overturn parliamentary convention by rejecting the tax credit cuts.

The chair of the committee, Andrew Tyrie, also repeated his demand for the Treasury to provide more detailed analysis of how the proposed cuts will hit households at different points on the income scale.

Updated

Earlier this morning, Lord Lawson, one of the leaders of the Conservative campaign to leave the EU, strongly criticised the Bank of England governor for wading into politics. But Osborne said the former chancellor was “probably a bit disappointed that Mark Carney didn’t agree with him”.

Osborne argued, in front of MPs on the Treasury Committee: “What Mark Carney’s speech shows today is that there is a strong argument for reform.”

Alan Clarke of Scotiabank’s reaction to the strong UK retail sales figures was: Wow!

We know that the consumer has the wind in his / her sales:

  • Solid employment growth of 1.25% y/y;
  • Wage inflation over 3% y/y in the private sector;
  • Zero inflation

That all adds up to robust real income growth. With house price inflation picking up too, that is even more motivation for people to go shopping.

Last but not least, with expectations for the timing of the first rate hike being pushed back to end-2016 / early 2017 then consumer spending is clearly well supported.

In terms of the bigger picture, with Q3 GDP (1st estimate) scheduled for next week, I am all the more confident to go for 0.6% q/q rather than be cautious with 0.5.%.

I’m also starting to think about black eye Friday. Sure, it’s a good scheme to get people into the shops, but with sales volumes like this, do I really need to cut my prices? Not convinced.

Anyway – a great reading, and restores my faith that sooner rather than later is the right call on the first Bank Rate hike.”

George Osborne at the Treasury Committee

George Osborne at the Treasury Committee Photograph: parliamentlive.tv

The chancellor has been asked why the UK government has not clearly set out what it wants to achieve in its negotiations with the EU.

Osborne said it’s not sensible to turn up with a final list of demands on day one. “That’s not the way to start a negotiation.”

Updated

Osborne: not looking for special deal for City of London

Osborne told MPs on the Treasury Committee that the government is not looking for “special deals or carve-outs for the City of London” as it tries to renegotiate the terms of Britain’s EU membership, but wants a fair deal for all non-eurozone countries.

He said the other EU members have accepted the principle of a renegotiation and that discussions are now moving into a technical phase.

We are looking for a fair deal for non-euro members, including the United Kingdom.

We don’t want to be part of ever-closer union.

We are getting into specific discussions, technical discussions with the EU Commission and the Council.

He promised that this autumn more details will emerge as the EU talks move into a new phase.

Updated

An important part of the renegotiation is the relationship between non-euro and euro members of the EU, Osborne said.

George Osborne is being quizzed by the Treasury Committee. MPs are asking about Mark Carney’s remarks on Britain’s EU membership.

The chancellor said:

I agree with the speech the governor made. The analysis he outlined was that EU membership has helped create a more open and dynamic economy, but, and there’s a crucial but, developments in the eurozone mean we do need safeguards for the UK.”

That’s why the UK has embarked on negotiations to secure reforms of the European Union, he added.

As the governor pointed out it’s [EU membership] not an unalloyed good. It’s presented challenges.

The single market in financial services is on balance a good thing for the UK.

The government’s position is not that we are against immigration. We are for controlled migration.

Updated

JPMorgan economist Allan Monks has taken a closer look at Mark Carney’s Brexit speech, which said “ensured there was more than just one liberal Canadian taking the headlines this week”.

The speech will be seen as another foray by Carney into a heated political debate, and its tone comes across as friendly to the campaign for keeping the UK within the European Union – ahead of a referendum which is to be held before the end of 2017.

Accompanying the speech was a chunky 100 page BoE report discussing the impact of EU membership on the central bank’s policy objectives. Despite Carney earlier this week having described the report as “a bit of a yawner” it will not prevent some from asking whether the BoE should be taking a more neutral stance on such a highly charged political issue (especially after similar interventions by Carney on Scottish independence and climate change).

Carney emphasised the report is not a thorough quantitative review of the pros and cons of EU membership, but rather is designed to assess the impact of membership on the Bank’s policy objectives.

In doing so, however, Carney highlights the beneficial impact EU membership has likely had in lifting sustainable growth in the UK (through fostering greater competition, efficiency and openness in key markets). The flip side of this openness to Europe is the higher sensitivity to external shocks, although Carney believes policy makers in the UK have adequate capacity to deal with these challenges.

A key concern for Carney looking forward is that UK policymakers retain adequate flexibility and control over policy, even as euro area countries go through a process of greater integration and risk sharing in the wake of the financial crisis. Carney’s comments have clear parallels with the government’s position in the debate.

The assertion that EU membership is a net positive for the UK, with caveats that the terms of membership need to reflect UK domestic interests and flexibility, will go down well with the Prime Minister – who seeks to renegotiate the terms of membership ahead of the referendum vote, and remove a requirement for the UK to commit to ‘ever closer union’.”

What difference could the BoE’s intervention make? The opinion polls suggest that the result of the referendum will be very close.

Our view has been that opinion will shift as the campaign heats up, with polls indicating a comfortable lead for the campaign to remain within the EU. While a natural status quo bias is central to this view, it also reflects our belief that the “in” campaign will gain the backing of at least a majority in the business community.

This week the CBI – which represents a broad cross section of small and large businesses – moved off the fence by coming out in support for the UK staying within the EU. The rhetoric behind Carney’s remarks put the BoE in the same camp, even if the Governor stops short of offering an explicit endorsement. The impact of these interventions may not be visible in the opinion polls right away, but we would expect them to grow in significance as the referendum draws closer.”

The ONS said retail sales will add 0.1 percentage points to overall economic growth in the third quarter, boosted by beer sales during the Rugby World Cup.

Tills are ringing on the high street: The breakdown of the retail sales figures showed that household goods retailers saw the biggest increase in sales last month, of 4.7%. Supermarkets and other food stores posted a 2.3% rise. Petrol sales were also strong, up 3.8%. However, clothes and shoe retailers did not have a good month, reporting a 0.9% drop.

Excluding petrol, overall retail sales rose by 1.7% in September.

The Rugby World Cup boosted retail sales last month, according to statisticians.

Kate Davies, ONS head of retail sales statistics, said:

Falling in-store prices and promotions around the Rugby World Cup are likely to be the main factors why the quantity bought in the retail sector increased in September at the fastest monthly rate seen since December 2013. The retail sector is continuing to grow with September seeing the 29th consecutive month of year-on-year increases.”

Average store prices (including petrol stations) fell by 3.6% in September from a year earlier, the 15th consecutive month of year-on-year price falls. It was the joint-lowest reading since the series began in 1988.

Updated

Sterling has hit a one-month high of 72.95p against the euro on the strong retail sales figures, up 0.8% on the day. Against the dollar, the pound climbed to $1.5510, up 0.5% on the day.

Updated

UK retail sales jump 1.9%, biggest rise since end 2013

News flash: UK retail sales jumped 1.9% in September from the previous month – the biggest rise since December 2013, according to the Office for National Statistics.

Bank of England paper analyses positive impact of migration

A Bank of England paper on EU membership analyses the positive impact of migration, as Jonathan Portes, director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, notes. Click on the link in his tweet to read the paper. It says:

Openness to labour flows – via migration – can allow an inflow of skills not otherwise available in the domestic economy. Ortega and Peri (2014) find that migration boosts long-run GDP per capita, acting both through increased diversity of skills and a greater degree of patenting. At the firm level, several studies further find that migration has a positive impact on productivity by diversifying the high-skilled labour employed by firms.”

Updated

Updated

In other news, Britain’s competition watchdog said highstreet banks will be forced to encourage their customers to switch to rivals. Switching could potentially save bank customers £70 a year, it said.

But consumer groups called on the Competition and Markets Authority to take tougher action to inject competition into banking, after it refrained from more radical measures to break up the biggest players. The market is dominated by the big four banks – Lloyds Banking Group, Royal Bank of Scotland, HSBC and Barclays – which together control 77% of the current account market.

The prime minister and the chancellor both welcomed the governor’s comments last night.

Updated

Howard Archer, chief UK and European economist at IHS Global Insight, said:

Despite Mark Carney’s stressing that his speech and the BOE report is not a comprehensive view of the pros and cons of UK membership of the EU, our strong suspicion is that the pro-EU membership camp will find more to grab hold of and champion than the Out camp.

Carney said Britain was possibly “the leading beneficiary” of the EU’s single market, and that being in the bloc had been one of the drivers of its strong economic performance in the four decades since it first joined.

He made some positive remarks on the free movement of labour, observing that it “can help better match workers with firms, alleviating skill shortages and boosting the supply side of the potential growth rate of the economy.”

In addition, he noted that the UK has been the top recipient of foreign direct investment in the UK since the single market was established in 1992.

Updated

However, Carney’s intervention is also likely to be seen as strengthening David Cameron’s hand in negotiations on reforms with Britain’s EU partners. Carney urged the prime minister to demand “clear principles” to safeguard Britain’s interests outside the euro, as he warned that botched European integration could threaten financial stability.

Lawson slams Carney for wading into EU debate

But former chancellor Nigel Lawson slammed the Bank of England governor for wading into the debate on EU membership, saying his remarks were “regrettable”.

The Spectator’s Coffee House team agreed.

Updated

Catherine Bearder MEP, chair of the Liberal Democrat EU referendum campaign, was quick to seize on Carney’s comments:

The Bank of England’s intervention confirms what we already know: being in the EU brings huge benefits to the UK economy.

Those calling for EU exit have failed to present a credible alternative that would protect the economy and secure jobs.

Instead of retreating to the side-lines, Britain should stay and lead reform in Europe from within.”

More on Carney’s speech on EU membership at St Peter’s College in Oxford last night. The governor concluded:

Overall, EU membership has increased the openness of the UK economy, facilitating dynamism but also creating some monetary and financial stability challenges for the Bank of England to manage. Thus far, we have been able to meet these challenges.”

You can read the speech on the Bank of England’s website, and watch the webcast.

Bank of England governor Mark Carney makes a speech at the University of Oxford.

Bank of England governor Mark Carney makes a speech at the University of Oxford. Photograph: Pool/Getty Images

ECB chief Draghi to hint of more QE

Good morning and welcome to our rolling coverage of the world economy, the financial markets, the eurozone and the business world.

Policymakers from the European Central Bank have gathered in Valletta, Malta, for their monthly policy meeting (the governing council occasionally departs from its Frankfurt HQ to meet in other parts of the eurozone). The ECB is widely expected to keep its key interest rates unchanged along with its stimulus programme, despite fears over deflation.

But ECB president Mario Draghi may well strike a dovish tone again, and hint at further action towards the end of the year. Falling consumer prices (they slipped by 0.1% in the eurozone in September) and fears over the world economy suggest the central bank will ease policy at some point, unless things improve.

At the last press conference on 3 September, Draghi pointed to “renewed downside risks” to eurozone growth and inflation prospects, reflecting concerns about the outlook for emerging markets. He said that the ECB stood ready to adjust the size, composition or length of the QE programme if necessary.

Investec economist Chris Hare said:

Despite the QE teasers offered last month, our view is that Mr Draghi will not pull the trigger for now. In part, that is because developments since the then have seen a mixed bag, rather than an obvious worsening in conditions.

We still think that additional QE will be appropriate at some point, given global growth risks and the weakness of eurozone inflation (we are fairly agnostic on whether it will come in terms of size, composition or duration). More natural trigger dates would be the December, or perhaps next March’s, policy meeting. That would allow the ECB to announce the expansion alongside updated forecasts. December is also the month where we think the Federal Reserve will start raising rates: that, alongside a QE boost announcement, might give the euro a double kick down, offering a double whammy of stimulus to get inflation back on track.”

European stock markets are set to open lower ahead of the ECB’s decision, which will be announced at 12.45pm UK time, followed by Draghi’s press conference at 1.30pm.

Over here, Bank of England governor Mark Carney gave his “Brexit” speech in Oxford last night. He said that EU membership opened up the UK economy and made it more dynamic, although he added that it also left it more exposed to financial shocks like the eurozone debt crisis.

Updated

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Oct. 21, 2015 (Allthingsforex.com) – At its monetary policy meeting today, the Bank of Canada decided to maintain the benchmark interest rate at the current level of 0.50%. The central bank’s policy makers expect growth to be in the “lower part of the bank’s range estimates”. Here is the text from the press release following the announcement.

“The Bank of Canada today announced that it is maintaining its target for the overnight rate at 1/2 per cent. The Bank Rate is correspondingly 3/4 per cent and the deposit rate is 1/4 per cent.

Inflation has evolved in line with the outlook in the Bank’s July Monetary Policy Report (MPR). Total CPI inflation remains near the bottom of the Bank’s target range, owing to declines in consumer energy prices. Core inflation is close to 2 per cent as the transitory effects of the past depreciation of the Canadian dollar are roughly offsetting disinflationary pressures from economic slack, which has increased this year. The Bank judges that the underlying trend in inflation continues to be about 1.5 to 1.7 per cent.

Global economic growth has been a little weaker than expected this year, but the dynamics pointing to a pickup in 2016 and 2017 remain largely intact. Uncertainty about China’s transition to a slower growth path has contributed to further downward pressure on prices for oil and other commodities. These factors are weighing on growth in many emerging markets and some other economies. Looking ahead to 2016 and 2017, the positive effects of cheaper energy and broadly accommodative financial conditions should become increasingly evident. In the United States, the economy is expected to continue growing at a solid pace with particular strength in private domestic demand, which is important for Canadian exports.

Canada’s economy has rebounded, as projected in July. In non-resource sectors, the looked-for signs of strength are more evident, supported by the stimulative effects of previous monetary policy actions and past depreciation of the Canadian dollar. Household spending continues to underpin economic activity and is expected to grow at a moderate pace over the projection period. However, lower prices for oil and other commodities since the summer have further lowered Canada’s terms of trade and are dampening business investment and exports in the resource sector. This has led to a modest downward revision to the Bank’s growth forecast for 2016 and 2017.

The Bank projects real GDP will grow by just over 1 per cent in 2015 before firming to about 2 per cent in 2016 and 2 1/2 per cent in 2017. The complex economic adjustments to the decline in Canada’s terms of trade will continue to play out over the projection horizon. The weaker profile for business investment suggests that, in the near term, growth in potential output is more likely to be in the lower part of the Bank’s range of estimates. Given this judgment about potential output, the Canadian economy can be expected to return to full capacity, and inflation sustainably to target, around mid-2017.

The Bank judges that the risks around the inflation profile are roughly balanced. Meanwhile, as financial vulnerabilities in the household sector continue to edge higher, risks to financial stability are evolving as expected. Taking all of these developments into consideration, the Bank judges that the current stance of monetary policy remains appropriate. Therefore, the target for the overnight rate remains at 1/2 per cent.

Information note

The next scheduled date for announcing the overnight rate target is 2 December 2015. The next full update of the Bank’s outlook for the economy and inflation, including risks to the projection, will be published in the MPR on 20 January 2016.”

 

World’s second largest economy continues to see slowing growth. Chinese GDP growth at six year low, but central bank unlikely to cut rates says economist. Weak European construction output. ECB likely to leave QE unchanged at next meeting…

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Markets mixed despite better than expected Chinese GDP – business live” was written by Nick Fletcher, for theguardian.com on Monday 19th October 2015 12.20 UTC

Here’s a full report on Oprah Winfrey’s deal with Weight Watchers:

Meanwhile Weight Watchers shares have jumped around 40% in pre-market trading following the news that Oprah Winfrey will invest and join the board.

That’s a nice return already on her investment.

Morgan Stanley earnings drop more than 42%

More news from the US, and Wall Street bank Morgan Stanley has just reported a 42.4% fall in third quarter earnings to $939m.

It was hit by turbulence in bond, currency and commodity markets following the concerns about the Chinese economy.

Oprah Winfrey takes stake in Weight Watchers

Over in the US, Oprah Winfrey has linked up with Weight Watchers International, buying a 10% stake in the business – with an option for another 5% – and is joining the board.

Winfrey said: “I believe in the program so much I decided to invest in the company and partner in its evolution.”

Oprah.

Oprah. Photograph: Splash News/Corbis

Updated

China could overtake Europe for trade in 20 years – survey

As Chinese president Xi Jinping begins his state visit to the UK, British people expect China to overtake Europe as our most valuable trading partner in 20 years. A poll by YouGov also shows Brits are enthusiastic about closer economic co-operation with the Chinese.

Of those surveyed, 40% said our most valuable trading partner was Europe, with 23% choosing China. But in the next two decades this is expected to change, with 29% predicting China will be our top partner and 22% forecasting it will still be Europe.

UK trade partners.

UK trade partners. Photograph: YouGov/YouGov

Nearly half – 43% – said the UK should be seeking closer trading links with China, with 31% saying it should continue the current level of economic co-operation and only 8% saying it should weaken ties.

Closer trade with China?

Closer trade with China? Photograph: YouGov/YouGov

The majority – 54% – believed China would to continue into the next two decades with either much stronger economic growth than now (22%) or slightly stronger growth than now (32%). Only 14% predicted weaker growth. In addition, 37% expected China’s growth to lift the UK’s, while 26% said it wouldcome at the expense of western economies and 10% said it would not make any difference.

But YouGov added:

The British public seems to have a pragmatic approach to economic relations with China, but there is not much evidence of great affection for the country. Of the 12 biggest economies by GDP excluding the USA and those in Europe, China comes in at 8th in terms of net positive impressions (29% positive, 55% negative).

Ireland moves to reduce need for one and two cent coins

Ireland has moved to cut back on one and two cent coins, with plans to launch a nationwide scheme to allow retailers to round bills to the nearest five cents – with the consent of shoppers. PA reports:

Since the euro was introduced in 2001 Ireland has spent €37m issuing one and two cent coins – minting the coppers at three times the rate of the rest of the eurozone.

But the initiative to reduce the need for coppers is voluntary and consumers will retain the right to pay the exact bill and request their exact change.

The Central Bank insisted rounding would only apply to cash transactions and not to credit card, electronic or cheque payments and it would also only be used on the final cash total of a bill and not to individual goods.

As examples it said final bills ending in one and two cents or six and seven cents would be rounded down to the nearest five and those ending in three and four cents or eight and nine cents would be rounded up.

Other rules on the rounding scheme include that one and two cent coins remain legal tender.

The nationwide initiative starts on October 28.

It follows a successful trial in Wexford in 2013, which showed that 85% of consumers and 100% of retailers in Wexford who expressed an opinion wanted rounding rolled out nationally.

Ireland to cut back on one and two cent coins.

Ireland to cut back on one and two cent coins. Photograph: Chris Bacon/PA

Back to China, and the weak GDP figures show that the stimulus measures introduced by the country’s central bank have had a limited effect, said Professor Kamel Mellahi at Warwick Business School. He said:

If there is one thing to take away from the third quarter figures it is the limited short-term impact of financial and economic stimulus packages on the Chinese economy. The Chinese Government has introduced a number of measures to stimulate economic growth, but so far the needle hasn’t moved much.

Right now it’s very important the Chinese Government is focused on the long-term economic fundamentals and resists the temptation to take unnecessary actions simply to meet short-term economic growth targets.

One cannot, and should not, read too much into the third quarter growth figures. A growth of 6.9% is slightly below official government expectations but they are also marginally better than the 6.8% that most economists have predicted. Because it’s the weakest growth since 2009, the figures are very symbolic but I don’t think they tell us something substantially new about the state of the Chinese economy.

The 0.2% fall in eurozone construction in August compared to July was due to civil enginering declining by 0.3% and building construction by 0.2%, according to statistics office Eurostat.

In the wider European Union, construction output fell by 1.2% month on month.

The year on year decline in the euro area was 6% and in the EU as a whole 5%.

The full report is here:

Production in construction down by 0.2% in euro area

Decline in European construction.

Decline in European construction. Photograph: Eurostat/Eurostat

Weaker European construction output

Eurozone construction output came in weaker in August, new figures have just revealed:

Updated

Chinese GDP does not tell the whole story

More on the Chinese figures and their accuracy or otherwise. Real growth could be closer to 3% to 4% according to Russ Mould, investment director at broker AJ Bell. He said:

Chinese headline GDP growth looks healthy at 6.9% but underlying metrics suggest the real growth rate could be nearer 3% – 4%. If you look at growth in rail cargo traffic, electricity consumption and demand for loans, three metrics favoured by Prime Minister Li, the picture is not so healthy.

Credit growth still looks promising but freight shipments and electricity demand growth look to be sagging, so the so-called Li Keqiang index does raise a few questions.

Today’s GDP figures are encouraging but investors with exposure to China should still expect some bumps and lumps along the way.

Chinese growth slows

Chinese growth slows Photograph: AJ Bell / Thomson Reuters Datastream/AJ Bell / Thomson Reuters Datastream

One of the disadvantages of being a stock market index laden with commodity companies is that the sector often has a disproportionate influence on events.

So it is today. With the weak Chinese data mining companies have come under pressure on concerns about slowing demand from the world’s second largest economy. With the likes of Anglo American and Glencore down between 2% and 4%, this means the FTSE 100 has slipped back into negative territory, while other European markets are still moving higher.

Chris Beauchamp, senior market analyst at IG, said:

Overall growth in China in the third quarter was a respectable 6.9%, while strength in consumer spending will allay some fears about a slowdown. However, the figures will do nothing to dispel the idea that this particular growth bonanza has come to an end.

Big name mining stocks are in the red again this morning, with the sector at its lowest level in nearly two weeks. It looks increasingly like the bounce of early October was a false dawn, and barring some kind of sustained revival in risk appetite, perhaps via fresh monetary stimulus, the sector is heading lower once again.

Mining shares fall

Mining shares fall Photograph: Reuters/Reuters

ECB expected to leave QE unchanged this week

One of the main economic events this week is the latest meeting of the European Cental Bank, due to take place in Malta.

Despite the weakness of the global economy and continued low inflation, the bank is widely expected to keep its quantitive easing programme unchanged but suggest it is ready to act further if necessary. Many economists believe an expansion of the programme – which involves €60bn of asset purchases a month and is due to run until at least September 2016 – could be unveiled in December.

ECB board member Ewald Nowotny said it was too early to discuss changing the programme in one of a couple of interviews over the weekend and today. He said (quote from Reuters):

In my view it’s too early to talk about (adjusting the asset purchases) because we still have almost a year of the programme ahead of us.

Economists at RBC Capital Markets said:

[Nowotny] remarked that Fed policy was not a “decisive aspect” in ECB decision-making, and that one should also not overestimate the impact of a slowdown in China. His more hawkish tone contrasts with the dovish tenor to his remarks from last week, where he acknowledged the clear weakness in domestic inflationary trends.

Nowotny said in a separate interview that the ECB has to show it is in control of inflation but governments may need to loosen fiscal policies to boost growth. He said it was too early to determine long term inflation trends, with low oil and commodity prices at the moment having a strong influence.

The service sector is now the biggest part of the Chinese economy:

One of the shares pushing the German market higher is Deutsche Bank.

It has jumped more than 3% after unveiling plans over the weekend to split its investment bank in two, and removing a number of top executives as part of an overhaul by chief executive John Cryan. Earlier this month the bank announced a record loss of €6bn in the third quarter.

The full story is here:

Updated

European markets are now making a better fist of it after an uncertain start, as traders take a more positive view of the Chinese data (it was disappointing but not as bad as expected).

The FTSE 100 is up 0.2%, Germany’s Dax has added 0.9% and France’s Cac is up 0.8%.

Markets

Markets recover after Chinese data Photograph: Reuters/Reuters

Greek creditors to examine reforms this week

Over in Greece, and the country’s creditors will be reviewing its finances and the progress of reforms to release the next tranche of the €2bn rescue package. The move follows the successful passing of measures through parliament early on Saturday, despite protests against the package.

Finance minister Euclid Tsakalotos and prime minister Alexis Tsipras in parliament on Friday.

Finance minister Euclid Tsakalotos and prime minister Alexis Tsipras in parliament on Friday. Photograph: Panayiotis Tzamaros/NurPhoto/Corbis

Greek newspaper Kathimerini reports:

Representatives of Greece’s lenders – the European Commission, the European Central Bank, the European Stability Mechanism and the International Monetary Fund – are expected to return to Athens on Tuesday to start a review that, Greece hopes, will end successfully, paving the way for the launch of talks on debt relief.

The auditors are to scour Greece’s finances too, following the presentation of the draft budget. Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos is expected to request flexibility, arguing that the recession estimates in the draft budget – 2.3% of gross domestic product this year and 1.3% next year – are overly pessimistic.

His aim is to eliminate some of the more contentious austerity measures that Greece has suspended, such as plans for a 23% value added tax on private schools and higher taxes on rental income.

As regards pension reform, another controversial issue, the government is keen to convince creditors to allow the inclusion of certain prior actions in a broader overhaul of the pension system, to come later.

As regards the €2bn loan tranche, the Euro Working Group is to convene on Wednesday and may recommend the immediate release of the money or may ask Greece to legislate more actions from the first list of prior actions.

The full report is here.

Protesters at a rally in front of the Greek parliament in Athens as MPs voted for reforms.

Protesters at a rally in front of the Greek parliament in Athens as MPs voted for reforms. Photograph: Louisa Gouliamaki/AFP/Getty Images

Despite the weak Chinese numbers, Tim Condon at ING Bank believes the Chinese central bank is unlikely to cut interest rates any further. He said:

The third quarter GDP data on its own implies a revision in our full-year forecast to 6.9% from 6.8%. However, our previous forecast was based on an acceleration in fourth quarter growth from reduced financial market turbulence and the impact of the stimulus implemented in response to the turbulence. We think the argument still applies and we are revising our full-year forecast to 7.0% (Bloomberg consensus 6.8%).

We see the September economic data, including the money and credit data released last week, as enabling the PBOC to remain on hold. We are revising our forecast of one 25 basis point policy interest cut in the current quarter to no more cuts.

We retain our forecast of one more cut in the reserve ratio requirement [the amount of cash that lenders must hold as reserves] in the current quarter to sterilize the impact of hot money outflows on interbank liquidity.

Shire falls on drug disappointment

One of the biggest UK fallers so far is pharmaceutical group Shire.

Its shares are down 1.8% after the US Food and Drug Administration said late on Friday that it would not approve the company’s new dry eye drug, lifitegrast, based on current data. Chief executive Flemming Ornskov said he was disappointed but still hoped to launch the treatment in 2016. If results from a new phase 3 trial due by the end of the year are positive, Shire planned to refile a submission to the FDA in the first quarter of 2016. Ornskov said:

We are committed to working with FDA to expeditiously provide the evidence required to deliver a new prescription treatment option for the 29 million adults in the US living with the symptoms of this chronic and progressive disease. This is an area of unmet medical need for which there has been no new FDA-approved treatment in over a decade.

European markets make a mixed start

The weak Chinese GDP data has seen European shares get off to an uncertain start for the week.

The FTSE 100 is up 0.15% but Germany’s Dax, France’s Cac and Spain’s Ibex have dipped 0.2%.

In China itself, the Shanghai composite has ended down 0.1% at 3386.7 points.

Oil prices have edged lower on renewed concerns about a lack of demand amid a supply glut, with Brent crude down 0.48% at $50.22 a barrel.

ITV buys television assets of Northern Irish broadcaster UTV

On the corporate front, ITV has agreed to pay £100m for the television business of Northern Irish broadcaster UTV in a long expected deal.

It means the long-gestating consolitation of the independent television network is getting into its final stages, with 13 of the 15 licences now in the hands of ITV. Analysts at Liberum:

We see the deal as a strategic plus, especially if ITV can charge retransmission revenues for the main channel where we expect more newsflow before Christmas. We reiterate ITV as our top pick in media sector.

More suggestions the official Chinese GDP figure may be an overestimation:

The Chinese data comes as the country’s president, Xi Jinping, begins his first official state visit to London.

There are likely to be deals signed and co-operation agreements made, but the visit is controversial. It is likely to be marked by protests against human rights abuses, and concerns that the UK may be jeopardising national security by allowing Chinese state companies to invest in British nuclear power plants.

And it comes amid increased wariness towards China by the US. More here:

In Asia the Shanghai Composite is currently down 0.48%, while the Nikkei is 0.88% lower and the Hang Seng is down 0.54%.

European markets are expected to make an uncertain start after the mixed messages from the Chinese data. Here are the opening forecasts from IG Index:

Chinese economic growth at a six year low

Good morning and welcome to our our rolling coverage of the world economy, the financial markets, the eurozone and the business world.

China is in the spotlight once more, with news of a slowdown in economic growth in the third quarter. The world’s second largest economy grew by 6.9%, compared to 7% in the previous quarter, and the lowest rate since the 6.2% recorded in 2009 during the global recession.

The figure was slightly better than the 6.7% expected by economists but is still likely to prompt concerns about the outlook. The government has cut interest rates five times since November, and further stimulus measures are expected in the wake of a continued slowdown.

Our full report is here:

Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets, said:

Last week’s China trade balance numbers showed that while exports improved slightly, the sharp drop in imports suggested that internal demand remains constrained by the weakness in commodity prices, as well as lower domestic consumption, raising concerns that the Chinese government could well find it difficult to hit its 7% GDP target for this year.

This morning’s Chinese Q3 GDP was expected to reinforce these concerns, but came in rather conveniently slightly better than markets had been expecting at 6.9%, and above some of the more pessimistic expectations of 6.7%.

While most people accept that China’s GDP numbers should only be taking at face value, due to concerns that it is artificially inflated, this number does seem surprisingly good given how weak some of the more recent individual data components have been.

This is borne out by a much bigger than expected drop in the September industrial production numbers, which came in at 5.7% and well below expectations of 6%, and well down from 6.1% in August, while Chinese retail sales saw an increase of 10.9%, only slightly higher than August’s 10.8%. Fixed asset investment also disappointed, coming in at 10.3%, down from 10.9% in August.

Economist Danny Gabay of Fathom Consulting echoed the scepticism about the Chinese figures. He told the Today programme: “The figures are produced remarkably quickly and rarely revised.” And he believes the real figure is closer to 3%.

Otherwise it appears a relatively quiet day so far, but we’ll be keeping an eye on all the latest developments.

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Kristin Forbes, a member of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee, signals she may vote for an interest rate hike on the back of recovering UK economy by downplaying potential fallout for UK from emerging markets slowdown…

 

Powered by Guardian.co.ukThis article titled “Bank of England policymaker says rate rise will come sooner, not later” was written by Katie Allen, for theguardian.com on Friday 16th October 2015 13.06 UTC

An interest rate hike in the UK will come “sooner rather than later” and pessimism about the state of the global economy is overdone, according to a Bank of England policymaker.

Kristin Forbes, a member of the bank’s rate-setting monetary policy committee (MPC), was also upbeat about the domestic economy. She argued that the country had only limited exposure to emerging markets such as Russia and Brazil and that, despite signs of a slowdown in those markets, British businesses should not be deterred from building stronger links with them.

Forbes’s intervention, against the backdrop of a recovering UK economy, indicated that she is preparing to vote for rates to be raised from their current record low of 0.5%.

“Despite the doom and gloom sentiment, the news on the international economy has not caused me to adjust my prior expectations that the next move in UK interest rates will be up and that it will occur sooner rather than later,” she said in a speech on Friday.

Forbes conceded that if some of the potential risks to emerging markets play out – such as a sharper than expected slowdown – “then the UK economy is unlikely to be immune”. But she said the UK’s exposure “appears manageable”.

Her comments align her with fellow rate-setter Ian McCafferty, who has voted for higher rates at recent policy meetings, where the MPC has split 8-1 at recent gatherings in favour of holding rates steady. But the Bank’s chief economist, Andy Haldane, said last month that rates may have to be cut further given signs of a slowdown in the UK and risks to the global economy from China.

The newest member of the nine-person MPC, Jan Vlieghe, also left the door open to an interest rate cut this week when questioned by MPs. Highlighting low inflation, Vlieghe told parliament’s Treasury committee that there was an option to cut rates but that the next move was “more likely to be up than down”.

Forbes, a US economics professor, said that on emerging markets, “recent negative headlines merit a closer look”.

“After considering the actual data and differences across countries, the actual news for this group is much more balanced (albeit not all bright),” she said in her speech, entitled “growing your business in the global economy: Not all doom and gloom”.

She was speaking a week after the International Monetary Fund warned central bankers that the world economy risks another crash unless they continue to support growth with low interest rates.

Forbes referred to the IMF’s latest downgrade to global growth prospects but noted that the fund had left its China forecasts unchanged. The data from China “has not yet weakened by anything close to what the gloomy headlines imply”, she added.

More broadly, she felt the global outlook was also better than headlines suggested.

“Although the risks and uncertainties in the global economy have increased, the widespread pessimism is overstated,” Forbes said.

She told business leaders that they should not be deterred from trading with emerging markets by the recent negative news, which “should prove temporary”.

“UK companies – as a whole – have been slow to expand into emerging markets. This may provide some stability over the next few months if the heightened risks in some of these countries become reality. But when viewed over a longer perspective, this limited exposure to emerging markets has caused the UK to miss out on growth opportunities in the past,” Forbes said.

UK interest rates were slashed to shore up the economy during the global financial crisis and they have stayed at a record low for more than six years. With inflation below zero and headwinds from overseas, economists do not expect a rate hike until well into next year.

In the US, interest rates are also at a record low of near-zero. Policymakers had been signalling they could start hiking last month but then worries about China’s downturn prompted them to wait. Still, the Federal Reserve chair, Janet Yellen, recently said the current global weakness will not be “significant” enough to alter the central bank’s plans to raise rates by December.

Forbes was also optimistic that the UK could weather the turmoil and said its domestic-led expansion “shows all signs of continuing, even if at a more moderate pace than in the earlier stages of the recovery.””

Howard Archer, an economist at the consultancy IHS Global Insight, said Forbes’ remarks reinforced the picture of a wide range of views on the rate-setting committee.

“The current wide range of differing views within the MPC highlights just how uncertain the outlook for UK interest rates is – although it still seems to be very much a question of when will the Bank of England start to raise interest rates rather than will they,” he said.

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